Is This Where Investors Should Be Looking When Oil Recovers

When oil prices recover--and plenty of analysts think the climb back up will start soon--Canada's western frontier of Saskatchewan and neighboring Alberta will 'still have the edge', according to a report from TD Economics.

Depressed oil prices may have skewed the view from Canada's oil-producing west, but this will be one of the better places to bet on the oil rebound.

Saskatchewan remains the last highly accessible onshore North American oil frontier and it is home to part of the prolific Williston Basin.

Texas: From Shale Boom to Water Revolution

Texas is famous the world over for two things on a massive scale: oil and droughts. Now the slick but dry state is becoming famous for water: that precious element that both resolves the drought problem and also makes it possible to pump more oil out of the ground.

Not only does Texas have the Permian Basin and the Eagle Ford shale, but it also has the Gulf of Mexico and its massive oil deposits and endless gallons of seawater that are now economically treatable thanks to next generation water processing technology.

Roman Abramovich Invests $15M In New US Fracking Technology

Are the Russians coming to Texas riding the tailwinds of fracking? That depends on who you ask, as some believe Russian forces were behind the anti-fracking vote in Denton, while a $15 million investment in new Texas fracking technology by Roman Abramovich perhaps tells another story.

When the anti-fracking campaign started to heat up late last year in Denton, Texas--the heart of the shale revolution--conspiracy theories were spread from within the pro-fracking community that the Russians were behind the whole thing. The logic was that the American shale revolution threatened Russia's market share.

How To Thrive In The Current Oil Environment

With crude oil prices collapsing and small American oil producers faced with grim choices for survival, the Darwinian nature of commodity market cycles rears its head, dictating that only the fittest will survive--and only the fittest of the fittest will thrive. As the herd of small companies that formed the backbone of the shale boom is culled, there emerges a new focus on junior players who are sitting on prime prospects where oil can be produced at $20 per barrel or lower and still turn a healthy profit at today's prices hovering around $48 - $54 range. The biggest winners will be those investors who are stepping into the market right now, investing in conventional oil stories.

As Excitement Builds in the Montney, Companies Seek More Infrastructure

What does it take to build up a new region for oil and gas development? Obviously, the resources have to be in place and economically recoverable. But it is not as easy as just sticking a drill into the ground and pumping out oil and gas.

Even with significant oil and gas reserves trapped in shale, a variety of factors need to come together to turn a given region into a significant producer. To begin with, there needs to be enough companies willing to take risks on major drilling projects. Next, there needs to be enough capital behind those companies to make projects viable. And once explorers find and prove commercial quantities of oil and gas, there needs to be infrastructure in place to move the energy to market.

Follow The Sand To The Real Fracking Boom

When it takes up to four million pounds of sand to frack a single well, it's no wonder that demand is outpacing supply and frack sand producers are becoming the biggest behind-the-scenes beneficiaries of the American oil and gas boom.

Demand is exploding for "frac sand"--a durable, high-purity quartz sand used to help produce petroleum fluids and prop up man-made fractures in shale rock formations through which oil and gas flows--turning this segment into the top driver of value in the shale revolution.

"One of the major players in Eagle Ford is saying they're short 6 million tons of 100 mesh alone in 2014 and they don't know where to get it. And that's just one player," Rasool Mohammad, President and CEO of Select Sands Corporation told Oilprice.com.

The Driving Force Behind the US Oil Boom

The shale revolution's sweet spot is oilfield services, the lower-risk backbone of the American oil and gas boom that pays off regardless of a play's economics.

Behind the stardom of the explorers and producers who have put themselves on the revolutionary shale map and absorb most of the risk--are the service providers who make up a highly lucrative market segment.

The US land-based rig count rose 3% over the last quarter, reaching a two-year high of 1,870 active rigs. A major factor in this growth has been an uptick in horizontal drilling in the Permian Basin, Texas' revived giant, where the rig count was up 21% year-on-year.

Kenya: Africa’s Hottest Emerging Oil Exporter

Not even the specter of a spillover of Islamic extremism from Somalia can dampen the atmosphere in Kenya, where commercial oil production is expected to begin in 2016 and discovery after discovery has made this the hottest and fastest-paced hydrocarbon scene on the continent.

When it comes to new oil and gas frontiers, today it's all about Africa. And more specifically, it's all about the eastern coast, with Kenya the clear darling--not just because it's outpacing neighboring Uganda by leaps and bounds, but also because despite some political instability hiccups and the threat of militant al-Shabaab, it's still one of the safest venues in the region.

Canada’s Shale Boom: More To Come In Montney

In the world of a constantly changing oil and gas environment, the Montney shale basin is the sleeping giant that holds the key to accelerating Canada's shale oil and gas boom, but the real treasure within this giant is a tight liquids-rich zone (approximately 15-20 miles wide) that has big and small players alike narrowing their focus for the potential of a giant payout.

Soros Signals Argentina’s Shale is Biggest Place to Be

One of the world's legendary investors is upping his bet on Argentina's shale oil and gas industry in a show of confidence for shale production in South America's largest unconventional prize --and a big boost for both supermajors and smaller players making big waves in the heart of new discovery areas.

George Soros has doubled his stake in YPF SA, the state-owned oil company in Argentina, which sits atop some of the world's largest shale oil and gas resources, and is about to get even larger following a new discovery over the last couple of weeks of a second key shale play.

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