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Mod Note: Throwback Thursday: this post originally went up on 8/22/12.

The most common arguments on WSO are about what it really takes to make it to Wall Street... and then what your options are if you get there. Working professionals come here to engage in witty banter and relax, only to spend half our time here debunking bullshit and writing advice based on our (limited) personal experiences.

How can we cut to the chase and give these kids hard data on which to base their life decisions, as well as save ourselves some time so we can get back to important things like ass and titties?

The answer came to me as I was googling a few ex-coworkers from a long time ago, just to see how they’ve been doing and whether I’ve done better or worse (something people do far more than they’d like to admit). The data is out there.

Yeah, anyone with enough connections could throw a data set together from LinkedIn. But let’s face it: there are a lot of losers out there who did some shitty back-office role at GS five years ago and are now answering phones at Ameriprise. We don’t want them in the data set. We want certified ballers only, right?

Let’s just say that, thanks to some HR friends and a truly brilliant data miner, I now have a high-quality data set that contains details of education and career path (over the past 5-10 years) of hundreds of bulge-bracket investment bankers at every level from analyst to MD. (Yes, it has names and such as well, but obviously I’m not sharing those.) It is longitudinal, meaning that it follows these bankers from a certain point in their careers up until today. It also gives a sense as to comparative compensation levels, though no dollar figures there.

Just looking at the initial cut of the data, I see lots of surprises. (The last 10-15% of the data is still being compiled, so I’ll throw hard numbers behind these statements when I have them.)

  • A lot of these people did their undergrad at good state schools. Far more than I expected, at every level. Maybe I shouldn’t worship quite so intently at the HYPS altar.
  • Far more analysts got a direct promotion to associate than I expected.
  • Canadians are everywhere. Some kind of secret fucking society. (Hey Canadians, if you love socialism so much, why did you cross the border to fuel the capitalist juggernaut? How’s that Visa status looking, by the way? Better keep your nose clean or you’ll be back in fucking Saskatchewan cutting lumber with your six brothers before you can say “Tim Hortons”.)
  • Late career is more brutal than it looks. People who leave the firm over 50 almost always take a big step down. People who stay are either the 1/1000 who can ride that bull all the way to the top... or they gradually get put out to pasture. From what I can tell in the data set, it doesn’t look voluntary (i.e., comp/dealflow starts to wane, then two years later they’re either playing poker or they start a boutique shop with two buddies and an analyst and have no dealflow).
  • More associates than I thought come from nontraditional paths (i.e., not straight from the analyst program or b-school.
  • The concept of a two-year analyst program is just that: a concept. The actual tenure of people hired into traditional two-year programs varies from that ideal by quite a bit.

There are more surprises here, but I’ll get to them. Let me ask you: what sort of queries should we run on this to answer some of the eternal debates here?
Some examples of questions we could answer:

  • Average/max age upon entering business school?
  • Is business school necessary?
  • What percent of people who start a two-year analyst program actually finish it?
  • What percent of analysts actually accomplish a 2+2 banking/PE combo?
  • Which b-schools will get you there? (So far, this looks pretty traditional. I think the point may go to Brady on this one.)
  • How many chicks make it to MD, and is comp similar to males?
  • How many chicks make it past analyst? Associate?
  • Ditto Asians/Indians (would take some doing since I don't have ethnicity data in the set, but could be done).
  • On average, how many Wall Street firms do people work for over their careers?

Thoughts?

EDIT: By the way, don't bother asking a question if you're not ready for the answer. This hasn't happened yet, but I fully expect someone to start dissing the data if the answer isn't what they want/expect to hear. (This ain't my first time at that particular rodeo, kids.)

Going deep into sampling methodology would risk burning my source, not to mention myself. So folks will have to take me at my word that the sampling method is sufficiently strong. If you don't take me at my word, don't ask the question.

The entire point of statistical sampling is to cut through existing bias, not confirm it. So if you just want some stats to confirm your belief, it's probably easier to just play senior banker (or WSO monkey) and make up some stats that sound right to you.

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Comments (208)

  • melvvvar's picture

    by 30, 90% washout rate. among 20 personal IBD acquaintances, 2 made it to MD, 9 washed out at VP/associate level, the rest left as analysts. two left before their first year was up. VP GS salary, around 500K at the peak in '07. asians and indians don't do well in the long run. biggest successes skipped bschool.

  • Beretta's picture

    - Racial make up of bankers vs demographics of the country
    - Where bankers live (do they all migrate to Greenwich?)

    If you can do those two, that'll be great.

  • Neighbor's picture

    An insightful bankerella post........................what's happening here

    I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

  • monyet's picture

    There is an urban myth at Wharton that you don't beed an MBA after Wharton undergrad, does your data back that up ? Also, I have a sneaking suspicion that there isn't much point in going to an undergrad business school. How do Wharton undergrands compare to hyps grads (especially the HYPS grads that went back from an MBA) ?

  • ladubs111's picture

    Pie chart of Target, non-target, semi-target so that shit can be finally buried deep for another year. As well as MBA tier break down % so that shit can be buried for 6 months. And maybe for fun # of marriages on average per each level for shits and giggles plz (guessing MD would be like 2, 1st year analyst would be 0)

  • Ben Shalom Bernanke's picture

    bankerella wrote:

    Better keep your nose clean or you’ll be back in fucking Saskatchewan cutting lumber with your six brothers before you can say “Tim Hortons”.)

    haha

  • In reply to monyet
    bankerella's picture

    monyet wrote:
    There is an urban myth at Wharton that you don't beed an MBA after Wharton undergrad, does your data back that up ? Also, I have a sneaking suspicion that there isn't much point in going to an undergrad business school. How do Wharton undergrands compare to hyps grads (especially the HYPS grads that went back from an MBA) ?

    Now there's a very good set of questions. I'm aware of that myth on the street as well.

    My hunch from personal experience is that Wharton undergrads do become direct-promotes at higher rates but peter out in mid-career. (However, one thing that this exercise has shown me is that years of personal observations are still nowhere near as accurate as a real data set, because we tend to observe and remember things that confirm the beliefs we started with.)

    There is a substantial subset of Wharton undergrads in this sample, so I'll look at 'em and tell you guys what I find.

  • In reply to ladubs111
    bankerella's picture

    ladubs111 wrote:
    Pie chart of Target, non-target, semi-target so that shit can be finally buried deep for another year. As well as MBA tier break down % so that shit can be buried for 6 months. And maybe for fun # of marriages on average per each level for shits and giggles plz (guessing MD would be like 2, 1st year analyst would be 0)

    I like the pie chart idea. Do you guys care about the whole population or just the analysts? I ask because it looks like analysts are more likely to be from a target than MDs. This could be a function of the fact that recruiting standards (and percent/number of Americans going to college) have changed a lot over the last twenty years.

    Also, please, somebody throw me a clue on semi-targets. WTF is a semi-target? I've been peripherally involved with recruiting in one way or another for my whole fucking career, and I still don't comprehend the semi-target distinction.

    Target school: has a team of alumni working at the firm who go back to recruit. We do EISs and talks, conduct first rounds on campus, and generally try to get as many of our people in the door as possible, whether summer or full-time.

    Non-target school: Maybe a resume drop, maybe nothing. We don't go there, we don't have an alumni team, etc.

    Semi-target school: Everything in between? Or we might go do first-rounds there in order to round out our full-time program?

    Someone break it down for me in a way my miniscule reptilian brain can comprehend. Or upload a list. Or just admit that nobody really knows how to define semi-target, and that the whole population of colleges is a spectrum with HYPS on one end and DeVry on the other.

  • Tommy Too-toned's picture

    Riddle me this...how many people leave the biz to open places like Double or Muffin?

  • In reply to bankerella
    GS's picture

    bankerella wrote:

    Now there's a very good set of questions. I'm aware of that myth on the street as well.

    My hunch from personal experience is that Wharton undergrads do become direct-promotes at higher rates but peter out in mid-career. (However, one thing that this exercise has shown me is that years of personal observations are still nowhere near as accurate as a real data set, because we tend to observe and remember things that confirm the beliefs we started with.)

    There is a substantial subset of Wharton undergrads in this sample, so I'll look at 'em and tell you guys what I find.

    Thx. Pls do

  • couchy's picture

    would be awesome if the pie chart is just analyst level. Most people here don't even want to make it up to MD on the sell-side.

    S&T, ER pie charts would be cool also if you had the data

  • SirTradesaLot's picture

    Are you only looking at IBD or does it include other areas of the bank? If including other areas, I would love to see if Quants have lower career ceilings than others. Most people believe this to be true.

    adapt or die wrote:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • capitalizeddisinterest's picture

    you got some balls dropping the gloves at canadians like that. of all the different groups trying to get visas, youre gunna chirp canadians? word to the wise if i wanted to keep my nose clean and i met someone with 6 lumberjack brothers i would probably shut up. dont ever again let me catch you speaking the words tim hortons... we have people everywhere, now you know

  • HarvardOrBust's picture

    Would be interesting to see:
    1. School break down
    2. Number of analysts who make it to PE, then differentiate between megafund, large MM, MM, lower MM
    3. Number of analysts who make it to HF

  • harvardgrad08's picture

    great post bankerella...this is the type of thread that is extremely valuable for the WSO community.

  • In reply to bankerella
    BTbanker's picture

    bankerella wrote:

    Semi-target school: Everything in between? Or we might go do first-rounds there in order to round out our full-time program? .

    Do a quick check on Indiana University Kelly's IB Workshop. They place 100% and are considered a large state school semi-target.

  • happypantsmcgee's picture

    Best post in months, really looking forward to whatever analysis comes out of it.

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • In reply to bankerella
    ladubs111's picture

    bankerella wrote:
    ladubs111 wrote:
    Pie chart of Target, non-target, semi-target so that shit can be finally buried deep for another year. As well as MBA tier break down % so that shit can be buried for 6 months. And maybe for fun # of marriages on average per each level for shits and giggles plz (guessing MD would be like 2, 1st year analyst would be 0)

    I like the pie chart idea. Do you guys care about the whole population or just the analysts? I ask because it looks like analysts are more likely to be from a target than MDs. This could be a function of the fact that recruiting standards (and percent/number of Americans going to college) have changed a lot over the last twenty years.

    Also, please, somebody throw me a clue on semi-targets. WTF is a semi-target? I've been peripherally involved with recruiting in one way or another for my whole fucking career, and I still don't comprehend the semi-target distinction.

    Target school: has a team of alumni working at the firm who go back to recruit. We do EISs and talks, conduct first rounds on campus, and generally try to get as many of our people in the door as possible, whether summer or full-time.

    Non-target school: Maybe a resume drop, maybe nothing. We don't go there, we don't have an alumni team, etc.

    Semi-target school: Everything in between? Or we might go do first-rounds there in order to round out our full-time program?

    Someone break it down for me in a way my miniscule reptilian brain can comprehend. Or upload a list. Or just admit that nobody really knows how to define semi-target, and that the whole population of colleges is a spectrum with HYPS on one end and DeVry on the other.

    Ya target can be somewhat classified but non target i dont know neither. Best best would be just use that shit US news rankings for semi target and non target and just filter it from like top 40 or 50 minus the generally accepted target schools names as semi target and rest as others.

  • In reply to capitalizeddisinterest
    bankerella's picture

    capitalizeddisinterest wrote:
    you got some balls dropping the gloves at canadians like that. of all the different groups trying to get visas, youre gunna chirp canadians? word to the wise if i wanted to keep my nose clean and i met someone with 6 lumberjack brothers i would probably shut up. dont ever again let me catch you speaking the words tim hortons... we have people everywhere, now you know

    Yeah, the issue there is that every other group getting visas stands out, they can't truly infiltrate. Even if they look like us, there's an accent. But the Canadians -- shit, man, they're deep cover. You think "Oh, I only know like two Canadians, it's no big deal." But then once you actually get your hands on real data, you realize that there are thousands of them out there on the street, flashing those Canadian hand signals at each other, doing their dirty little Canadian deals, promoting Canadians, hiring Canadians.

    It's a vast fucking conspiracy. Fortunately, I caught and tortured one of them by holding a Timbit under his nose until he caved. In between bouts of weeping and repeating, "God Save the Queen," he finally told me how Canadians recognize each other. Look for a tiny red dot on the--

  • Bonus's picture

    Hey, great thread!
    What about percentages of people from Europe working in Wall Street ?

    Colourful TV, colourless Life.

  • ladubs111's picture

    Now most of them Canadians don't happen to work for the RBC now would they??????

  • Unforseen's picture

    I going to assume the CDN stats rose exponentially after Ivey hired that person from DLJ as their head of career services in the early 90s.....

  • duffmt6's picture

    Bravo.

    Would love to see an "exit opps" breakdown based on BB, middle market, elite boutique, unknown boutique, etc. I imagine the % in PE or HF is far lower than most people imagine and % straight to b-school is higher than most would think.

    What type of sample size are we talking?

    "For I am a sinner in the hands of an angry God. Bloody Mary full of vodka, blessed are you among cocktails. Pray for me now and at the hour of my death, which I hope is soon. Amen."

  • Going Concern's picture

    area chart showing percentage of each segment of finance populated on y-axis and year in career on x-axis. looks like year 1 will be 100% IB based on sample set, we'll have to work with that. year 10 should show very little IB, maybe 10% or less, and rest 90% should be mostly paradise areas. please include legend with distinct colors used for each segment, but no pink, we need this to be presentable. at minimum, HF, AM, PE, VC, F500, IB should be represented. please revert back with q's. please label years and percentages clearly, include appropriate title.

    thx

    “A deception that elevates us is dearer than a host of low truths”

  • In reply to duffmt6
    bankerella's picture

    duffmt6 wrote:
    Bravo.

    Would love to see an "exit opps" breakdown based on BB, middle market, elite boutique, unknown boutique, etc. I imagine the % in PE or HF is far lower than most people imagine and % straight to b-school is higher than most would think.

    What type of sample size are we talking?

    Yep, an exit opps analysis is a given. Question is: what constitutes an exit? A lot of these guys "exit" to someplace new every 18 months during the time period covered by the study. Does only the first exit count, or do we care more about where they ultimately ended up (or, to be more specific, whatever firm they're at today)?

    Sample size looks like it's going to wind up somewhere around 250-300 individuals who have every cell filled out, maybe as many as 500 depending on what the question is.

  • UFOinsider's picture

    bankerella wrote:
    Thoughts?

    bankerella wrote:
    so we can get back to important things like ass and titties?

    Yes, let's, I'm a fan. but first:
    bankerella wrote:
    More associates than I thought come from nontraditional paths (i.e., not straight from the analyst program or b-school.

    I'd like to learn more about this? What are the alternate routes, what did they do, what degrees did they get, did they start at the firm and transfer from another area, what about the oddball non finance backgrounds, etc...

    Get busy living

  • In reply to UFOinsider
    bankerella's picture

    UFOinsider wrote:
    bankerella wrote:
    Thoughts?

    bankerella wrote:
    so we can get back to important things like ass and titties?

    Yes, let's, I'm a fan. but first:
    bankerella wrote:
    More associates than I thought come from nontraditional paths (i.e., not straight from the analyst program or b-school.

    I'd like to learn more about this? What are the alternate routes, what did they do, what degrees did they get, did they start at the firm and transfer from another area, what about the oddball non finance backgrounds, etc...

    Yep, good questions. I can give percentages soon, but preliminary glance says that some nontraditional associates enter from:

    1-2 years in industry/corp dev post-MBA
    Top accounting/consulting/strategy post-MBA
    Big law (presumably they had an M&A focus)

    One thing I don't see is any associates coming in from nontraditional backgrounds who only have a bachelor's.

    Also don't see anybody coming straight out of any kind of academic program except MBA. So no MSIS or financial masters' degrees. Also no JDs straight from school (unless of course they did a JD/MBA).

    Also, looks like most/all the MBAs were two-year programs.

  • In reply to bankerella
    UFOinsider's picture

    bankerella wrote:
    UFOinsider wrote:
    bankerella wrote:
    Thoughts?

    bankerella wrote:
    so we can get back to important things like ass and titties?

    Yes, let's, I'm a fan. but first:
    bankerella wrote:
    More associates than I thought come from nontraditional paths (i.e., not straight from the analyst program or b-school.

    I'd like to learn more about this? What are the alternate routes, what did they do, what degrees did they get, did they start at the firm and transfer from another area, what about the oddball non finance backgrounds, etc...

    Yep, good questions. I can give percentages soon, but preliminary glance says that some nontraditional associates enter from:

    1-2 years in industry/corp dev post-MBA
    Top accounting/consulting/strategy post-MBA
    Big law (presumably they had an M&A focus)

    One thing I don't see is any associates coming in from nontraditional backgrounds who only have a bachelor's.

    Also don't see anybody coming straight out of any kind of academic program except MBA. So no MSIS or financial masters' degrees. Also no JDs straight from school (unless of course they did a JD/MBA).

    Also, looks like most/all the MBAs were two-year programs.


    Ok, so fairly standard MBA rebranding efforts? Work/travel/blahblahblah -> MBA -> IBD with a few law degrees mixed in for flavor, yes?

    One followup question: incoming analysts: how many coming out of big4 TAS, Sales (where I am), AM, ER, ops, etc... Did you go there at all?

    Get busy living

  • BigMac14's picture

    You clearly know nothing about Canadians.

  • In reply to UFOinsider
    bankerella's picture

    UFOinsider wrote:

    Ok, so fairly standard MBA rebranding efforts? Work/travel/blahblahblah -> MBA -> IBD with a few law degrees mixed in for flavor, yes?

    Actually, I meant MBA --> industry/corp dev/accounting/strategy -->IBD

    One thing I found slightly odd is that all the people going from accounting/consulting associate to IBD associate already had MBAs. In other words, perhaps you really do need either an MBA or a highly successful IBD analyst tenure. And perhaps, in accounting/consulting, direct-promote is not a get-out-of-MBA-free card.

    Quote:
    One followup question: incoming analysts: how many coming out of big4 TAS, Sales (where I am), AM, ER, ops, etc... Did you go there at all?

    This is a more complicated question. I'm not really finding many analysts with a gap between graduation and start date, leading me to believe that it's actually pretty rare for analysts to come from anywhere but college (or college + masters). But for people who are more senior and entered as analysts a long time ago, there are frequently big gaps between their undergrad graduation and their entry into the IBD analyst role

    There are a couple of ways we could interpret that. Perhaps times have changed and there used to be a road from AM/ER/big4/ops to IBD analyst that isn't there anymore. On the other hand, perhaps the jump is just so difficult that those who make it clearly have the connections to stick around and become senior.

  • In reply to bankerella
    UFOinsider's picture

    bankerella wrote:
    UFOinsider wrote:

    Ok, so fairly standard MBA rebranding efforts? Work/travel/blahblahblah -> MBA -> IBD with a few law degrees mixed in for flavor, yes?

    Actually, I meant MBA --> industry/corp dev/accounting/strategy -->IBD

    One thing I found slightly odd is that all the people going from accounting/consulting associate to IBD associate already had MBAs. In other words, perhaps you really do need either an MBA or a highly successful IBD analyst tenure. And perhaps, in accounting/consulting, direct-promote is not a get-out-of-MBA-free card.


    Extremely interesting. Out of this sample, what percent of those MBAs are M7? Is there enough data to find a tendancy?

    Get busy living

  • In reply to UFOinsider
    bankerella's picture

    UFOinsider wrote:
    bankerella wrote:
    UFOinsider wrote:

    Ok, so fairly standard MBA rebranding efforts? Work/travel/blahblahblah -> MBA -> IBD with a few law degrees mixed in for flavor, yes?

    Actually, I meant MBA --> industry/corp dev/accounting/strategy -->IBD

    One thing I found slightly odd is that all the people going from accounting/consulting associate to IBD associate already had MBAs. In other words, perhaps you really do need either an MBA or a highly successful IBD analyst tenure. And perhaps, in accounting/consulting, direct-promote is not a get-out-of-MBA-free card.


    Extremely interesting. Out of this sample, what percent of those MBAs are M7? Is there enough data to find a tendancy?

    Yep, data's good here. Out of MBAs in the sample, looks like roughly 50% were M7. The split between M7s was fairly even, with Columbia and Wharton taking a slight lead.

    An additional ~45% were Tuck, Stern, Ross, Duke, Darden, Haas, Anderson, Cornell. The split here looks heavily weighted to Tuck and Ross.

    IBD associates from nontraditional backgrounds. Let me get back to you on that.

  • In reply to bankerella
    sayandarula's picture

    bankerella wrote:

    Edit: Sorry, I misread you. The data in this comment refers to all the MBAs in the whole set, not the subset of people with MBAs entering as IBD associates from nontraditional backgrounds. Let me get back to you on that.

    if you could provide this data, it would possibly be the single most useful piece of information i've ever gotten on WSO.

    +1, and count me in as a bankerella fanboy.

    Money Never Sleeps? More like Money Never SUCKS amirite?!?!?!?

  • In reply to bankerella
    G Spread's picture

    bankerella wrote:
    capitalizeddisinterest wrote:
    you got some balls dropping the gloves at canadians like that. of all the different groups trying to get visas, youre gunna chirp canadians? word to the wise if i wanted to keep my nose clean and i met someone with 6 lumberjack brothers i would probably shut up. dont ever again let me catch you speaking the words tim hortons... we have people everywhere, now you know

    Yeah, the issue there is that every other group getting visas stands out, they can't truly infiltrate. Even if they look like us, there's an accent. But the Canadians -- shit, man, they're deep cover. You think "Oh, I only know like two Canadians, it's no big deal." But then once you actually get your hands on real data, you realize that there are thousands of them out there on the street, flashing those Canadian hand signals at each other, doing their dirty little Canadian deals, promoting Canadians, hiring Canadians.

    It's a vast fucking conspiracy. Fortunately, I caught and tortured one of them by holding a Timbit under his nose until he caved. In between bouts of weeping and repeating, "God Save the Queen," he finally told me how Canadians recognize each other. Look for a tiny red dot on the--

    Clearly, you have a right to say who can work in the US and who can't, seeing as the US wouldn't be half as great if it weren't for you. I'm amazed at how pretentious and condescending you are.

  • In reply to G Spread
    monyet's picture

    Pancakes wrote:
    bankerella wrote:
    capitalizeddisinterest wrote:
    you got some balls dropping the gloves at canadians like that. of all the different groups trying to get visas, youre gunna chirp canadians? word to the wise if i wanted to keep my nose clean and i met someone with 6 lumberjack brothers i would probably shut up. dont ever again let me catch you speaking the words tim hortons... we have people everywhere, now you know

    Yeah, the issue there is that every other group getting visas stands out, they can't truly infiltrate. Even if they look like us, there's an accent. But the Canadians -- shit, man, they're deep cover. You think "Oh, I only know like two Canadians, it's no big deal." But then once you actually get your hands on real data, you realize that there are thousands of them out there on the street, flashing those Canadian hand signals at each other, doing their dirty little Canadian deals, promoting Canadians, hiring Canadians.

    It's a vast fucking conspiracy. Fortunately, I caught and tortured one of them by holding a Timbit under his nose until he caved. In between bouts of weeping and repeating, "God Save the Queen," he finally told me how Canadians recognize each other. Look for a tiny red dot on the--

    Clearly, you have a right to say who can work in the US and who can't, seeing as the US wouldn't be half as great if it weren't for you. I'm amazed at how pretentious and condescending you are.

    Ha, I know its hard to detect sarcasm in text, but I think it's bloody obvious she's being sarcastic.

    Wait, now i'm not sure whether you're being sarcastic by sarcastically calling out her sarcasm - mind blown.

  • In reply to G Spread
    bankerella's picture

    Pancakes wrote:

    Clearly, you have a right to say who can work in the US and who can't, seeing as the US wouldn't be half as great if it weren't for you. I'm amazed at how pretentious and condescending you are.

    Aw, shucks, I can't take all the credit. Whatever it is you're talking about, I was able to achieve it because I was standing on the shoulders of giants -- the giant fucking douchebags that have gone before me.

  • In reply to monyet
    Going Concern's picture

    monyet wrote:
    Pancakes wrote:
    bankerella wrote:
    capitalizeddisinterest wrote:
    you got some balls dropping the gloves at canadians like that. of all the different groups trying to get visas, youre gunna chirp canadians? word to the wise if i wanted to keep my nose clean and i met someone with 6 lumberjack brothers i would probably shut up. dont ever again let me catch you speaking the words tim hortons... we have people everywhere, now you know

    Yeah, the issue there is that every other group getting visas stands out, they can't truly infiltrate. Even if they look like us, there's an accent. But the Canadians -- shit, man, they're deep cover. You think "Oh, I only know like two Canadians, it's no big deal." But then once you actually get your hands on real data, you realize that there are thousands of them out there on the street, flashing those Canadian hand signals at each other, doing their dirty little Canadian deals, promoting Canadians, hiring Canadians.

    It's a vast fucking conspiracy. Fortunately, I caught and tortured one of them by holding a Timbit under his nose until he caved. In between bouts of weeping and repeating, "God Save the Queen," he finally told me how Canadians recognize each other. Look for a tiny red dot on the--

    Clearly, you have a right to say who can work in the US and who can't, seeing as the US wouldn't be half as great if it weren't for you. I'm amazed at how pretentious and condescending you are.

    Ha, I know its hard to detect sarcasm in text, but I think it's bloody obvious she's being sarcastic.

    Wait, now i'm not sure whether you're being sarcastic by sarcastically calling out her sarcasm - mind blown.

    and i think your mind being blow is definitely sarcastic...but if i am also bein sarcastic then that is 4 levels deep of sarcasm, kind of like inception but with wso posts and tiers of sarcasm

    “A deception that elevates us is dearer than a host of low truths”

  • In reply to bankerella
    SirTradesaLot's picture

    bankerella wrote:
    Pancakes wrote:

    Clearly, you have a right to say who can work in the US and who can't, seeing as the US wouldn't be half as great if it weren't for you. I'm amazed at how pretentious and condescending you are.

    Aw, shucks -- I can't take all the credit. Whatever it is you're talking about, I was able to achieve it because I was standing on the shoulders of giants. In other words, the giant fucking douchebags that have gone before me.


    You're welcome.

    adapt or die wrote:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • monyet's picture

    All Whartonites have access to the Wharton database on spike (it's under the community tab, then alumni directory). It basically has every single alumni, all the jobs they've had with dates, it allows you to stratify by industry, company, title, city and a whole bunch of other random things. It has their personal and work emails, it even gives you their home addresses (I've got to admit, i did check out a few of the pads on google maps just out of curiosity, bloody sick some of them - if i ever run out of money in the city or london, I'll just knock on their door saying I'm an alum that needs shelter lol jk) and telephone numbers (surprisingly some really powerful alums data is up there (i.e I've got Donald Trump's number lol - not that I'd call it). It's got 85 k names there (Jed Cairo actually exists btw), so its a pretty good resource. Bloody useful, it has a lot of filtering options so I'm sure we could do something with it. I'm too busy trying to get hired as an oil trader so I'm not bothered to do it, but i'm sure there are other Wharton alums that would be happy to help if you've got questions.

  • In reply to bankerella
    TechBanking's picture

    bankerella wrote:
    capitalizeddisinterest wrote:
    you got some balls dropping the gloves at canadians like that. of all the different groups trying to get visas, youre gunna chirp canadians? word to the wise if i wanted to keep my nose clean and i met someone with 6 lumberjack brothers i would probably shut up. dont ever again let me catch you speaking the words tim hortons... we have people everywhere, now you know

    Yeah, the issue there is that every other group getting visas stands out, they can't truly infiltrate. Even if they look like us, there's an accent. But the Canadians -- shit, man, they're deep cover. You think "Oh, I only know like two Canadians, it's no big deal." But then once you actually get your hands on real data, you realize that there are thousands of them out there on the street, flashing those Canadian hand signals at each other, doing their dirty little Canadian deals, promoting Canadians, hiring Canadians.

    It's a vast fucking conspiracy. Fortunately, I caught and tortured one of them by holding a Timbit under his nose until he caved. In between bouts of weeping and repeating, "God Save the Queen," he finally told me how Canadians recognize each other. Look for a tiny red dot on the--

  • watersign's picture

    how many have no college at all?

    alpha currency trader wanna-be

  • watersign's picture

    how many have no college at all?

    alpha currency trader wanna-be

  • In reply to watersign
    bankerella's picture

    watersign wrote:
    how many have no college at all?

    No individual in the sample has no college.

  • In reply to Going Concern
    UFOinsider's picture

    Going Concern wrote:
    monyet wrote:
    Pancakes wrote:
    bankerella wrote:
    capitalizeddisinterest wrote:
    you got some balls dropping the gloves at canadians like that. of all the different groups trying to get visas, youre gunna chirp canadians? word to the wise if i wanted to keep my nose clean and i met someone with 6 lumberjack brothers i would probably shut up. dont ever again let me catch you speaking the words tim hortons... we have people everywhere, now you know

    Yeah, the issue there is that every other group getting visas stands out, they can't truly infiltrate. Even if they look like us, there's an accent. But the Canadians -- shit, man, they're deep cover. You think "Oh, I only know like two Canadians, it's no big deal." But then once you actually get your hands on real data, you realize that there are thousands of them out there on the street, flashing those Canadian hand signals at each other, doing their dirty little Canadian deals, promoting Canadians, hiring Canadians.

    It's a vast fucking conspiracy. Fortunately, I caught and tortured one of them by holding a Timbit under his nose until he caved. In between bouts of weeping and repeating, "God Save the Queen," he finally told me how Canadians recognize each other. Look for a tiny red dot on the--

    Clearly, you have a right to say who can work in the US and who can't, seeing as the US wouldn't be half as great if it weren't for you. I'm amazed at how pretentious and condescending you are.

    Ha, I know its hard to detect sarcasm in text, but I think it's bloody obvious she's being sarcastic.

    Wait, now i'm not sure whether you're being sarcastic by sarcastically calling out her sarcasm - mind blown.

    and i think your mind being blow is definitely sarcastic...but if i am also bein sarcastic then that is 4 levels deep of sarcasm, kind of like inception but with wso posts and tiers of sarcasm


    Feels like I'm watching Inception again. WTH is going on?

    Get busy living

  • El_Mono's picture

    Well, what a nice post, kudos. I am wondering about people from latam, maybe you can give us an insight.

    Valor is of no service, chance rules all, and the bravest often fall by the hands of cowards. - Tacitus

    Dr. Nick Riviera: Hey, don't worry. You don't have to make up stories here. Save that for court!

  • In reply to UFOinsider
    Going Concern's picture

    UFOinsider wrote:
    Going Concern wrote:
    monyet wrote:
    Pancakes wrote:
    bankerella wrote:
    capitalizeddisinterest wrote:
    you got some balls dropping the gloves at canadians like that. of all the different groups trying to get visas, youre gunna chirp canadians? word to the wise if i wanted to keep my nose clean and i met someone with 6 lumberjack brothers i would probably shut up. dont ever again let me catch you speaking the words tim hortons... we have people everywhere, now you know

    Yeah, the issue there is that every other group getting visas stands out, they can't truly infiltrate. Even if they look like us, there's an accent. But the Canadians -- shit, man, they're deep cover. You think "Oh, I only know like two Canadians, it's no big deal." But then once you actually get your hands on real data, you realize that there are thousands of them out there on the street, flashing those Canadian hand signals at each other, doing their dirty little Canadian deals, promoting Canadians, hiring Canadians.

    It's a vast fucking conspiracy. Fortunately, I caught and tortured one of them by holding a Timbit under his nose until he caved. In between bouts of weeping and repeating, "God Save the Queen," he finally told me how Canadians recognize each other. Look for a tiny red dot on the--

    Clearly, you have a right to say who can work in the US and who can't, seeing as the US wouldn't be half as great if it weren't for you. I'm amazed at how pretentious and condescending you are.

    Ha, I know its hard to detect sarcasm in text, but I think it's bloody obvious she's being sarcastic.

    Wait, now i'm not sure whether you're being sarcastic by sarcastically calling out her sarcasm - mind blown.

    and i think your mind being blow is definitely sarcastic...but if i am also bein sarcastic then that is 4 levels deep of sarcasm, kind of like inception but with wso posts and tiers of sarcasm


    Feels like I'm watching Inception again. WTH is going on?

    you mustn't be afraid to dream a little bigger, darling

    “A deception that elevates us is dearer than a host of low truths”

  • illiniPride's picture

    Correlation between comp and dealflow / transaction $ would be interesting. Also comp as a percentage of dealflow at the VP and MD level

    Seems like this will be an amazing study / resource when this is done.

    Leadership can be defined in two words: "Follow Me"

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