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So I've officially accepted a position with a BB's IBD, but due to scheduleing and paperwork I don't expect to start prior to March.
In the mean time I'm going out of my skull at my current ER position. I don't want to take a month off in between gigs, and being my cautious self I don't want to drop that I'm planning on leaving yet, just in case something goes wrong prior to actually starting.

Basically, it's beautiful to be sitting here knowing that I'm done before we get hit with the next big reporting season, and I'm looking forward to giving notice to see if they throw me out or want me to stay and train my replacement. On the other hand it's killing me to wait and keep grinding on the models. Worried I might rage quit next time I get asked to do something stupid.

Currently, I'm fantasizing about different ways to quit, wordings for the final email etc.. Anyone ever quit in a great way?

company wide email about someone having an affair or calling the boss out on the way down the elevator?

Comments (37)

  • yeahright's picture

    Company going to have an ER job opening? NYC? Hit me up, you can start training me asap ;) ...seriously

    edit: Calgary? Boo! If you want to burn bridges just hop into the office and say, hey guys I'm quitting. If you do care, email to boss, thank you email to team, print email and hand to boss.

    Frank Sinatra - "Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy."

  • Falcon's picture

    Do it with class. Two weeks notice and a nice email to your group. Unless you just hated the place all along.

  • overpaid_overworked's picture

    No hate for the company, and my analyst has been good to me so I really don't want to hamstring the guy. I just want my paperwork to come through so I can get on with my new role. Its the waiting that kills me. Last job I left I was in the office till 7:00 pm on the last day of my two weeks when the boys had started my going away party at 12:00.

    Long story short, I've been so boring when I quit that I'm hoping someone will have some good burn the bridges stories.

  • UFOinsider's picture

    When Scarface quits in 'Half Baked', DO IT!!!!

    Get some rum and a Hawaiian shirt, start drinking on the last day. If you bring for everyone, they'll love you for it. I got my last boss hammered the day before I put my two weeks. I've personally never burned a bridge, but I did just stop showing up to one job.

    Seriously though, don't burn the bridge, you don't want it coming back to haunt you

    Get busy living

  • junkbondswap's picture

    Going out with a bang would definitely feel good for awhile but since you mentioned that the company has been relatively good to you I think you will find that treating people with the dignity and respect that they deserve will serve you much better off in the long run. Cant you just use some vacation days and/or slack off a bit.

  • Hank Scorpio's picture

    I walked out!

    Ever see a guy say good-bye to a shoe?

  • ladubs111's picture

    Official start of earning seasons in T-minus 40 mins!

  • Bobb's picture

    Will you be getting a bonus soon? Probably best to have that clear and then quit. But since you like the company and your analyst give two weeks once the bonus hits.

    My previous job I saw a few co-workers go out with a bang. A few deparment wide emails sent out (one told the entire department to follow him and quit) also saw a heated exhange between management and an employee which basically ended with "fuck you I quit".

  • HFFBALLfan123's picture

    When i quit i asked my boss to come into the conference room, told him about the offer i had and he was extremely understanding with it. We had a great relationship (still do) and he understood this was a far better option for me. Told me to take my laptop and phone in case he needed any help, kept me getting paid for 3 weeks while i was relaxing on the rooftop pool of my apt. Had a 2 week break after that to move to my new city, so relaxing to have no stress and no obligations. Don't burn any bridges, never know when you'll need a solid rec.

  • overpaid_overworked's picture

    There was a back office girl that went on three months stress disability, came back for a day, took two weeks vacation, then gave notice. Turned out she had accepted a job in another back office, wanted to test the waters and so worked through her probation at the new shop before quitting the old. I don't think it turned out well for her, sounded like disability leave got clawed back.

    I've also heard about a woman that got sued and settled after she deleted some proprietary company data from the server when she left, so that's no good.

    Last place I left, when I told my boss that I was leaving, he told me not to tell anyone else, had the President of the firm call me (regional boutique) and offer me an interest free loan to buy company stock. I don't regret leaving that place, but I didn't have fun on the way out. Certainly did cut back my hours though.

  • resipsa's picture

    Read How to Win Friends and Influence People. No matter what you tell people, they won't blame themselves. There is no use going out with a bang, you only cut off your nose to spite your face. Granted, I wish I could get some people to appreciate how little I appreciate them, however, it is no use.

  • In reply to ladubs111
    DontMakeMeShortYou's picture

    ladubs111:
    Official start of earning seasons in T-minus 40 mins!

    Now that I've picked up retail coverage, my earnings season never really ends!! Yayy!!! Someone please kill me.

  • MFFL's picture

    I'm sure most people will disagree with me, but I feel like a position like that deserves more than two weeks notice. They can't hire somebody to start in 2 weeks, much less have you train them. I've always felt like that rule is more for unskilled jobs (less than $15/hour).

    I would try to let them know a couple months ahead of time when I planned on leaving. That gives the company ample time to prepare for it. Again, I'm sure many people would disagree with me, but as long as you have a good relationship with your analyst, the more advanced notice you can give, the better in my opinion.

    "Well that's even more than less than unhelpful." - Jack Sparrow

  • In reply to MFFL
    SureThing's picture

    MFFL:
    I'm sure most people will disagree with me, but I feel like a position like that deserves more than two weeks notice. They can't hire somebody to start in 2 weeks, much less have you train them. I've always felt like that rule is more for unskilled jobs (less than $15/hour).

    I would try to let them know a couple months ahead of time when I planned on leaving. That gives the company ample time to prepare for it. Again, I'm sure many people would disagree with me, but as long as you have a good relationship with your analyst, the more advanced notice you can give, the better in my opinion.

    I'm with you here, as this thought crossed my mind while reading. However, one doesn't want to get screwed. A departing employee could give two months notice for example. Company recruits, rockstar candidate, little need for training, departing employee gets axed a month later.

    Of course this is hypothetical, but one really doesn't know what is going through their bosses mind no matter how great a relationship they have. Maybe they have insecurities and a quick to be spiteful.

    I do not agree that the more notice you give the better. I think one should determine the needs of themselves and the company to determine how much notice they give, two weeks should be left for unskilled jobs.

    When a plumber from Hoboken tells you he has a good feeling about a reverse iron condor spread on the Japanese Yen, you really have no choice. If you don’t do it to him, somebody else surely will. -Eddie B.

  • TheBenevolent's picture

    lol you think you are overworked now? wait till you start your BB IBD stint

  • Arbrotrageur's picture

    less than a short week ago, i myself quit by text msg an hour before i was supposed to trade the open. but i held back all the rage i couldve spewed and just went the quick and easy route. hmmm

  • superninja's picture

    Haha, but seriously has anyone ever brought in gifts or anything like that to give to your team on your way out? also OP is in Calgary?

  • overpaid_overworked's picture

    I was thinking of giving a month. If they punt me out the door as soon as I tell them, I spend the next month skiing. that said, it still doesn't give them much time, assume two weeks to hire a body, two weeks for them to start, means they get nothing from me.

    Maybe best case would be to leave end of May, lets them get a kid from university plus a month of training. That still seems so far away.

    That said, ER is a small world, getting smaller daily, almost seems that unless you leave industry you've gotta make nice with everyone and avoid the CLMs.

  • Bobb's picture

    I've seen people give 2 weeks (or more) and get asked to live that day since they were going to a competitor

  • In reply to overpaid_overworked
    Oreos's picture

    overpaid_overworked:
    If they punt me out the door as soon as I tell them, I spend the next month skiing.

    i like your style

    .

  • karypto's picture

    Give notice? On the mean streets of NYC, when you get let go you are out same day. Usually within 15-20 minutes. If you don't want to burn bridges, give 30 minute notice.

  • In reply to Oreos
    DontMakeMeShortYou's picture

    Oreos:
    overpaid_overworked:
    If they punt me out the door as soon as I tell them, I spend the next month skiing.

    i like your style

    Seconded

  • TeddyTheBear's picture

    You should give them three weeks. Your firm has been nice to you, I suggest you do the same. Believe me if your BB IBD has issues in the future and lays you off, you are going to be looking for work. Maintain all relationships well. Tell them early and ask them for help, stay late the remaining days and finish your remaining work, etc. This shows you still cared enough to finish strong instead of just leaving when the opportunity came.

  • animal2389's picture

    2 weeks is more than enough in my opinon... companies have no problem axing its employees often with no warning. Also as for not being able to fill a position unless its a really small firm they should have resumes on file ready to be interviewed.

  • kaitokid's picture

    I remember there was a new hire who got axed after a few days. This was at a well known BB. He made it through all the interview rounds and got the offer, came to work for 2 days and disappeared for a week. No one knew what happened to him nor could get in contact with him.

    After he showed up again, i kid you not, he bought in donuts and coffee and told the MDs he had an out of body experience and lost track of time.

    we didnt see him again after that.

  • TeddyTheBear's picture

    "he had an out of body experience and lost track of time"

    HAHAHAHAHA. Thats the best he could do. Kid doesn't seem very bright. If I missed a few days of work and the actual reasoning was that dumb, I would have just BSed. I would have came in a cast and said I got hit by a car.

  • In reply to DontMakeMeShortYou
    BlackHat's picture

    DontMakeMeShortYou:
    ladubs111:
    Official start of earning seasons in T-minus 40 mins!

    Now that I've picked up retail coverage, my earnings season never really ends!! Yayy!!! Someone please kill me.

    No love for the Monsanto call yesterday morning? Hugh Grant would be so disappointed (in the most Irish way possible)

    I hate victims who respect their executioners

  • ShreddiesBrah's picture

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  • In reply to superninja
    huanleshalemei's picture

    The Auto Show

  • ah's picture

    I don't accept sacrifices and I don't make them. ... If ever the pleasure of one has to be bought by the pain of the other, there better be no trade at all. A trade by which one gains and the other loses is a fraud.