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In the past I've always brought copies of my resume to interviews on heavy stock resume paper. Sometimes the interviewer takes a new copy, other times they just stick with the copy they printed from their comp. Question is what have you done in the past for BB analyst interviews? And if you do bring new copies, what did you carry them in? I usually carry them in my briefcase but was thinking of buying a portfolio. All answers greatly appreciated.

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Comments (19)

  • TNA's picture

    Always bring in the most current copy of your resume and get a leather portfolio.

  • M-001's picture

    Havent been to MANY interviews, but I always bring about 15 copies of the updated copy of my resume on resume paper.

    I have yet to hand one out. My last interview came from a contact I met while networking. He had an old copy of my resume which he put on file at the bank. The banker emailing me regarding the interview was still referring to that copy. Before the interview, I emailed him an updated copy. Everyone I spoke with that day had a printed copy of my updated resume. No need to hand any out.

    Just in case, I have them. I carry them in a leather portfolio with a notepad and a pen. Also a good place to keep business cards that you get from your interviewers.

  • youngmonkey's picture

    Bring a couple in case... it would be embarassing if they asked for a copy and you didn't have one

  • rooster's picture

    Personally, I always carry at least 10 and IMO, the interviewer doesn't give 2 shits about what type of paper your printed it on. It's actually better to print it on the cheapest paper possible and when they ask why the paper is so flimsy, you can tell them that you buy cheap paper so you can spend more money getting fucked up on natty light. 20x more respectable than that highbrow thick paper BS, you're a college student for christ sake

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I tend to think of myself as a one-man wolfpack
    Buyside strongside

  • M-001's picture

    Good to know!

    Even though it only costs a few bucks for 20 copies.

  • aquamarinee's picture

    I've never printed out my resume on so-called resume paper. Haven't had any problems.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    One thing I've realized after two or three years of interviewing is that it's always good to have visuals. If you have anything on your resume where someone can ask, "How does it work?" and the question involves more than a 20 second answer, bring in a diagram and be ready to get it out and explain everything off of it when someone comes in.

    If you are an engineer and have some project listed on your resume, be ready with a visual. If you work with some product (IE: Interest rate swaps), be ready with a visual. If you helped change some business process, be ready with a visual. Basically, if you have to explain anything the interviewer might not already know about and is at least a little complicated to explain, BE READY WITH A VISUAL.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    jimbrowngoU's picture

    IlliniProgrammer:
    One thing I've realized after two or three years of interviewing is that it's always good to have visuals. If you have anything on your resume where someone can ask, "How does it work?" and the question involves more than a 20 second answer, bring in a diagram and be ready to get it out and explain everything off of it when someone comes in.

    If you are an engineer and have some project listed on your resume, be ready with a visual. If you work with some product (IE: Interest rate swaps), be ready with a visual. If you helped change some business process, be ready with a visual. Basically, if you have to explain anything the interviewer might not already know about and is at least a little complicated to explain, BE READY WITH A VISUAL.

    This may just be me, but if someone pulled out a visual to show me how something worked on his resume, I'd likely be offended and auto-ding the candidate. A visual?! If I don't get what you're talking about but you can give me a quick, concise answer, I'll be impressed and stop pressing the issue. If you give me a lot of "umms" and "wells," I'm going to assume you're as clueless as I am and DING! Don't put something on your resume if you can't explain it concisely.

    May be different on the trading floor, but in banking, we sure aren't rocket scientists and diagrams sure as hell are NOT welcome.

    Oh, and with regards to bringing resumes: 100% bring a bunch. While I'd never raise an eyebrow if a resume was printed on cheap, thin, crap paper (that's what it belongs on), I'd certainly go, "WTF?" if someone handed me a resume on cardstock/fancy paper. My business card is meant to be printed on that stuff, not resumes. What I'm saying is: no one will ding you for bringing a resume on plain paper, but some douche may bag you for printing it out on fancy paper (trying too hard, desperate, tool -- all reasons that could be cited).

  • thaTHRILLA's picture

    i really don't think it's a problem if you put it on a slightly ticker paper. def. don't go overboard, but i think if you have your resume on a nice sheet of paper and it looks good without any spelling mistakes/formatting mistakes, then it can be nice. as long as you're not some tool with an offensive personality, you'll be fine.

    just don't come in with 0 printed resumes.

  • SirBankalot's picture

    Make sure your resume is of tasteful thickness. Then add a watermark to it.

    A surefire way to get a banker's attention.

  • In reply to jimbrowngoU
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    This may just be me, but if someone pulled out a visual to show me how something worked on his resume, I'd likely be offended and auto-ding the candidate. A visual?! If I don't get what you're talking about but you can give me a quick, concise answer, I'll be impressed and stop pressing the issue. If you give me a lot of "umms" and "wells," I'm going to assume you're as clueless as I am and DING! Don't put something on your resume if you can't explain it concisely.

    You must not be an engineer or programmer who has to deal with businesspeople. :D

    One of the things on my resume was a real-time analytics generation system that calculated 56 different analytics for our traders. Good luck explaining that concisely- when I get a question about "How does your system generate analytics?", it might as well be "Explain how crude gets processed into gasoline, kerosene, marine fuel oil, and tar from the fractionating tower to the hydrocracker at a refinery. How does your process add a competitive advantage to the refinery that other refineries don't benefit from or know about?" I will give my thirty second explanation while trying to avoid the technical jargon, and when I would see the puzzled look on my interviewer's face as he realizes he's in way over his head, I would get out the diagram. Today, when I get one of those "Explain in detail how your refinery works" questions, I automatically get out the diagram, start explaining it like I've done a gazillion times before, and give the interviewer the copy so he can review it later- which he will probably need to do if he doesn't have a technical background and really wants to understand my answer.

    If the interviewer is asking a question he already knows the answer to, don't get out a diagram. If the interviewer is asking a question he doesn't know the answer to- and probably doesn't even understand the scope of the complete answer, YOU NEED VISUALS.

    May be different on the trading floor, but in banking, we sure aren't rocket scientists and diagrams sure as hell are NOT welcome.

    Here's my thing- do you ever ask a question in an interview where you don't know how the answer is going to look?

    This happens for trading interviews all the time. Often, they can be a little adversarial where a trader will hope he can stump you with a "simple" question. You have to handle it nicely but at the same time show him that he got himself waay over his head while explaining everything in plain English.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    ShreddiesBrah's picture

    IlliniProgrammer:
    One thing I've realized after two or three years of interviewing is that it's always good to have visuals. If you have anything on your resume where someone can ask, "How does it work?" and the question involves more than a 20 second answer, bring in a diagram and be ready to get it out and explain everything off of it when someone comes in.

    If you are an engineer and have some project listed on your resume, be ready with a visual. If you work with some product (IE: Interest rate swaps), be ready with a visual. If you helped change some business process, be ready with a visual. Basically, if you have to explain anything the interviewer might not already know about and is at least a little complicated to explain, BE READY WITH A VISUAL.


    Sometimes, I'm not sure if you're being serious or just trolling ... I hope it was the later in this case.

  • In reply to ShreddiesBrah
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Brown_Bateman:

    Sometimes, I'm not sure if you're being serious or just trolling ... I hope it was the later in this case.

    No. In fact, having a visual helped me a lot in the interviews for my current job. There's a fine line between trying too hard and being prepared, though. When I got asked how my system worked, I said, "That's a great question with a pretty detailed answer. I've got a copy of the system diagram that I showed our production support staff a few weeks ago; it's probably good for us to take a look at this so my answer makes more sense." I'd casually pull out the diagram, and start talking about how everything worked while pointing stuff out on the sheet of paper. It's not that you prepared this just for the interview; it's just that you already made it for someone else and figured you might as well take it along just in case it might help the interviewer understand your answer better.

    Nothing formal- it's just, "Hey! I happened to have this diagram which makes it a lot easier for you to understand my answer about something I worked on. Let's take a look at it, because this answer's gonna take five minutes and it's gonna be easier for you to follow along if you're looking at the system diagram." Maybe it's just that engineers and quants are persnickety people who need to put everything in context, and explain everything in detail- nuances and all.

    You want:

    1.) To hit interviewers with information overload without making it look like you're trying all that hard. You just have to do it this way to answer their question.
    2.) To give interviewers an excuse to dwell on areas you're strong in. IE: the system you run or the product you invented. People tend to keep asking questions about what's right in front of them, and it takes off a little bit of the pressure if the interviewer is looking at your document just as much as he's looking at you.

  • vanillathunder12's picture

    Bumping an old thread to try to get more people's opinions on using resume paper vs regular printer paper. I was thinking about using ivory watermarked resume paper, but I don't want to come off as a douche. Any more opinions would be greatly appreciated.

  • In reply to M-001
    Billy Ray Valentine's picture

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  • heister's picture

    Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

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  • mudkipz's picture

    "so i herd u liek mudkipz" - sum kid
    "I'd watergun the **** outta that." - Kassad