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Hi guys,

Just got into Columbia Business School and Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
My heart and intellectual curiosity push me towards Harvard (MPA/ID, very quanty economics with a focus on development) but I don't see myself working as a public servant. My interests are technology, telecoms (including stuff like mobile health in Africa) and venture capital. If necessary I could work in consulting for a year or two (as I already have)

Would choosing Harvard be a bad career move and to what extent?

I appreciate your help

Comments (69)

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    It's a career decision- do you want to manage money or write historic speeches? Any reason why you chose to apply to Harvard's poly sci school rather than Harvard's MBA program?

  • TheManFromDownUnder's picture

    ^ The Kennedy School is less a poli sci school and more a public policy school. Most people I have met in the Kennedy School in their Econ/Development track work for foreign governments in their central banks or finance/planning ministries.

  • fomc's picture

    can you do both via a joint/dual degree?

  • Kenny_Powers_CFA's picture

    My perception of the Kennedy School is that it exists largely for rich foreigners to get "Harvard" on their resume.
    This may be totally unfair/not reflective of the program overall, but is true for 83.3% of the Kennedy MPAs I know.

    There have been many great comebacks throughout history. Jesus was dead but then came back as an all-powerful God-Zombie.

  • WGCC's picture

    ^Agreed. MPA is kinda a back door entrance into Harvard. The admission is just easier.

  • Brady4MVP's picture

    The masters program at the kennedy school is not as well respected as harvard law/business/med because they are much easier to get into. But going back to the OP's question, it is possible to arrange a joint program between the two schools. The logistics may be tough to figure out, and it will probably require a lot of commuting between NYC and Boston but certainly feasible. I know a guy who did Penn MD and MPP at harvard, for example. If your career interests lie in business (consulting, venture capital, strategy, etc) I don't see what value an MPA/ID would have. But if you want to engage in policy and work at a think tank, central bank, etc., then kennedy school is obviously a better bet. If you REALLY want both and are willing to commit 3-4 years and the extra money towards it, then try to do both concurrently.

  • chancethebanker's picture

    Why don't you get a MPA at harvard and then move into something like global macro hedge funds?

  • In reply to chancethebanker
    Brady4MVP's picture

    thatsracist:
    Why don't you get a MPA at harvard and then move into something like global macro hedge funds?

    No way he's gonna get a gig at a macro hedge fund straight out of MPA unless he gains work experience at a central bank/World Bank/IMF/think tank for a few years.

  • In reply to Brady4MVP
    k.03's picture

    Brady4MVP:
    The masters program at the kennedy school is not as well respected as harvard law/business/med because they are much easier to get into. But going back to the OP's question, it is possible to arrange a joint program between the two schools. The logistics may be tough to figure out, and it will probably require a lot of commuting between NYC and Boston but certainly feasible. I know a guy who did Penn MD and MPP at harvard, for example. If your career interests lie in business (consulting, venture capital, strategy, etc) I don't see what value an MPA/ID would have. But if you want to engage in policy and work at a think tank, central bank, etc., then kennedy school is obviously a better bet. If you REALLY want both and are willing to commit 3-4 years and the extra money towards it, then try to do both concurrently.

    No 3 years is just too much + I'd have to re-apply actually. Don't think being admitted separately into both automatically gets you into the joint degree.

    I already have a BSc + MSc in management (pretty common in Europe) so I don't think I'll learn that much with an MBA. I'll get the brand + the network. The questions is, can the HKS brand pull off what CBS can if I want to be say a Google exec in the long term?

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    k.03's picture

    IlliniProgrammer:
    It's a career decision- do you want to manage money or write historic speeches? Any reason why you chose to apply to Harvard's poly sci school rather than Harvard's MBA program?

    I didn't get into HBS (and probably not into SGSB either). The MPA/ID is the most selective masters at HKS though.

    There is a third choice actually. I can delay my admission to HKS for a year and reapply to HBS and SGSB. Problem is I don't want to waste a year and not that much will have changed on my application. Does re-applying in round 1 change much from an initial application in round 2?

  • In reply to k.03
    Brady4MVP's picture

    k.03:
    IlliniProgrammer:
    It's a career decision- do you want to manage money or write historic speeches? Any reason why you chose to apply to Harvard's poly sci school rather than Harvard's MBA program?

    I didn't get into HBS (and probably not into SGSB either). The MPA/ID is the most selective masters at HKS though.

    There is a third choice actually. I can delay my admission to HKS for a year and reapply to HBS and SGSB. Problem is I don't want to waste a year and not that much will have changed on my application. Does re-applying in round 1 change much from an initial application in round 2?

    It's obvious from reading your posts that your interests lie more in business. Do the Columbia MBA for sure. It's a top 7 business school and will open way more business doors than harvard kennedy school. I'm not bashing the MPA/ID at all; it's a great program, and you learn a lot, but they're just different beasts.

    HBS and Stanford Business are not too friendly towards re-applicants. Unless you make MAJOR changes to your resume, you're not gonna get in. Don't waste an extra year with the hopes of getting into one of those schools. Just do Columbia MBA.

  • Otter.'s picture

    Now I don't personally know anyone who has done an MPA at the Kennedy School, so I can't speak intelligently to this, but aren't you guys selling the Kennedy School a little short? I would think it's probably the most respected government/public policy school in the country (if not the world?)

    Hi, Eric Stratton, rush chairman, damn glad to meet you.

  • In reply to Otter.
    k.03's picture

    Otter.:
    Now I don't personally know anyone who has done an MPA at the Kennedy School, so I can't speak intelligently to this, but aren't you guys selling the Kennedy School a little short? I would think it's probably the most respected government/public policy school in the country (if not the world?)

    I think it is the most respected government school in the world, and perhaps the largest producer of heads of state per student. I've been dreaming about Harvard for almost a decade. It would kill me to give it up to study something I've studied before in a "top 7" b-school.

  • In reply to Otter.
    Kenny_Powers_CFA's picture

    Otter.:
    I would think it's probably the most respected government/public policy school in the country (if not the world?)

    Probably true, and Harvard Divinity School is one of the most respected places to get a masters in Divinity/Theology. Neither is a business school.

    There have been many great comebacks throughout history. Jesus was dead but then came back as an all-powerful God-Zombie.

  • In reply to Kenny_Powers_CFA
    Otter.'s picture

    Kenny_Powers_CFA:
    Otter.:
    I would think it's probably the most respected government/public policy school in the country (if not the world?)

    Probably true, and Harvard Divinity School is one of the most respected places to get a masters in Divinity/Theology. Neither is a business school.

    Of course - I guess what I was taking issue with was it being called a "back door" into Harvard. I'm in no way affiliated with the school and don't plan on ever applying, I just thought maybe that you weren't giving it enough credit considering its reputation.

    Hi, Eric Stratton, rush chairman, damn glad to meet you.

  • In reply to k.03
    Otter.'s picture

    k.03:
    Otter.:
    Now I don't personally know anyone who has done an MPA at the Kennedy School, so I can't speak intelligently to this, but aren't you guys selling the Kennedy School a little short? I would think it's probably the most respected government/public policy school in the country (if not the world?)

    I think it is the most respected government school in the world, and perhaps the largest producer of heads of state per student. I've been dreaming about Harvard for almost a decade. It would kill me to give it up to study something I've studied before in a "top 7" b-school.

    I'm definitely not the right person to advise on this, but I would think that Illini hit it on the head - just depends on what you want to do. KSG most likely does not churn out VCs.

    Hi, Eric Stratton, rush chairman, damn glad to meet you.

  • In reply to k.03
    Brady4MVP's picture

    k.03:
    Otter.:
    Now I don't personally know anyone who has done an MPA at the Kennedy School, so I can't speak intelligently to this, but aren't you guys selling the Kennedy School a little short? I would think it's probably the most respected government/public policy school in the country (if not the world?)

    I think it is the most respected government school in the world, and perhaps the largest producer of heads of state per student. I've been dreaming about Harvard for almost a decade. It would kill me to give it up to study something I've studied before in a "top 7" b-school.

    I've been obsessed with Harvard since fifth grade, so I understand your attachment. But even for me, given my career goals, there is no way I would take kennedy school over Columbia MBA.

    What do you want to do right after school? Do you want to work in business, or are you more into working in policy or government? If it's the former, this is a no-brainer.

    Moreover, an elite MBA is way more than what you actually learn in the classroom. It's about the network, the social experience, and the plethora of on-campus recruiting opportunities. And this doesn't even include access to an exhaustive alumni database and job postings that are exclusive to students and alums. At the end of the day, harvard's kennedy school, as esteemed as it is, ultimately is a policy school, NOT a busness program.

  • In reply to Kenny_Powers_CFA
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Kenny_Powers_CFA:
    Otter.:
    I would think it's probably the most respected government/public policy school in the country (if not the world?)

    Probably true, and Harvard Divinity School is one of the most respected places to get a masters in Divinity/Theology. Neither is a business school.

    Honestly, I would put Moody Bible Institute, Calvin, Hope, and Wheaton above Harvard, Yale, and even Princeton as divinity schools. If you want to be an academic, that's one thing, but if you want to run a megachurch or if you want to really change some lives, you really don't want to go to a "prestige" school.

    You tell folks in the evangelical church you studied at Moody Bible and they look at you like there must be something wrong with you. They ask you questions like "How did you manage to give up drinking, dancing, and watching movies for four long years?" "What is it like to spend all of this time volunteering at homeless shelters and drug rehab centers in lieu of tuition? What's your craziest story?" (No, I never went to MBI, but I have friends who have.) In the widest circles in the religious world- at least in the US, MBI's MDiv looks a lot more awesome and has a much better pedigree than Harvard's.

    MBI is absolutely free, they take anyone who says they're a Christian, and it is arguably the most rigorous divinity program in the country- particularly for evangelical Christians. It's created some of the best missionaries, evangelists, and church leaders of the past 50 years.

    OP should have applied to Georgetown if he wanted to go into politics. But it sounds like what he really wants to do is business- given that he also applied to the business school. I would take Columbia- it's a pretty good program.

  • In reply to Otter.
    Kenny_Powers_CFA's picture

    Otter.:
    I guess what I was taking issue with was it being called a "back door" into Harvard. I'm in no way affiliated with the school and don't plan on ever applying, I just thought maybe that you weren't giving it enough credit considering its reputation.

    Tough to say since I've only met 6 people from the school, but 5/6 were a) rich, b) foreign, and c) not super impressive.

    There have been many great comebacks throughout history. Jesus was dead but then came back as an all-powerful God-Zombie.

  • macro's picture

    LOL at the divinity school prestige rankings.. only on WSO

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    Kenny_Powers_CFA's picture

    IlliniProgrammer:
    Honestly, I would put Moody Bible Institute, Calvin, Hope, and Wheaton above Harvard, Yale, and even Princeton as divinity schools. If you want to be an academic, that's one thing, but if you want to run a megachurch or if you want to really change some lives, you really don't want to go to a "prestige" school.

    I was mostly being glib, and I hear you, though as you note in your post the places you mentioned are exclusively for a specific type of Christian.

    There have been many great comebacks throughout history. Jesus was dead but then came back as an all-powerful God-Zombie.

  • In reply to Kenny_Powers_CFA
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Kenny_Powers_CFA:

    I was mostly being glib, and I hear you, though as you note in your post the places you mentioned are exclusively for a specific type of Christian.

    Ehh, that specific kind of Christian constitutes the majority of non-Catholic religious folks in the US these days. I really hate prestige rankings, but suggesting that Harvard or Princeton are incredibly prestigious institutions outside Academia and the United Methodist Church is a little silly. People need to get over the assumption/obsession with target schools for one thing being targets for everything.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    Kenny_Powers_CFA's picture

    IlliniProgrammer:

    People need to get over the assumption/obsession with target schools for one thing being targets for everything.

    Totally agree, only mentioned Harvard Divinity in the context of making a point about choosing a school for what he wants to do, not the name on the diploma.

    There have been many great comebacks throughout history. Jesus was dead but then came back as an all-powerful God-Zombie.

  • k.03's picture

    Thanks guys for all the advice.

    I'm still leaning towards Harvard though. I can cross-register with HBS and take a number of MBA classes (hopefully up to 20-25% of all my classes). Given my MSc+MSc in Management + 2.5 years in management consulting, 770 GMAT etc, I think I can still convince an employer that I'm a good business guy.

    The classes at HBS will to some extent give me access to its network and demonstrate interest.

  • shorttheworld's picture

    so youre basically prestige whoring on the harvard name hardcore even though you KNOW you want to do business as opposed to just getting an MBA? sure you can convince but you wont have access to HBS OCR or anything like that

    destined to be a bloodbath. dont see why youre trying to complicate it.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Yeah. This is not exactly the way to convince folks that you're serious about investment banking.

    "So, you're interested in banking, but you decided to go for an MPA from the Harvard Kennedy School. Why not an MBA?"

    "Uhhh, I got into Columbia, but was rejected from Harvard's MBA program. However, I thought Harvard had a nice jingle to it and figured I would do an MPA there instead and maybe sneak in a few courses from the MBA program."

    "Interesting. So what you're saying really is that you turned down a pretty good MBA program and spent two years of your life getting the wrong degree because of prestige. Very interesting. Oh well, I got my MBA from Baruch and had a lot of fun at it, but everyone has their own perspectives, I guess."

    Interviewer looks at his form, marks poor/unsatisfactory on the "Cultural Fit" and "Business Interest" ratings for your candidacy and starts quietly wondering to himself when the interview will be over.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    k.03's picture

    I have no interest in investment banking. I'm interested in general management in industries such as tech or telecom and in the longer term VC (through industry/entrepreneurship, not through banking). If I can link this to development themes, then that's just gravy. Examples: mobile money or mobile health ventures in Africa, Google/Vodafone developing world strategy etc. I realize that this is perhaps not the appropriate forum to ask for guidance in these industries.

    An MBA would not bring me that much in terms of content. I've had four years of management, finance, marketing courses etc. At HKS I'm getting PhD-level economics which I actually find to be fascinating themes. I just don't want to end up as a bureaucrat in a process-obsessed institution.

    IlliniProgrammer:
    Yeah. This is not exactly the way to convince folks that you're serious about investment banking.

    "So, you're interested in banking, but you decided to go for an MPA from the Harvard Kennedy School. Why not an MBA?"

    "Uhhh, I got into Columbia, but was rejected from Harvard's MBA program. However, I thought Harvard had a nice jingle to it and figured I would do an MPA there instead and maybe sneak in a few courses from the MBA program."

    "Interesting. So what you're saying really is that you turned down a pretty good MBA program and spent two years of your life getting the wrong degree because of prestige. Very interesting. Oh well, I got my MBA from Baruch and had a lot of fun at it, but everyone has their own perspectives, I guess."

    Interviewer looks at his form, marks poor/unsatisfactory on the "Cultural Fit" and "Business Interest" ratings for your candidacy and starts quietly wondering to himself when the interview will be over.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Basically the same deal. If you want to be in business management, why the heck would you get a political science degree?

  • In reply to k.03
    vadremc's picture

    k.03:
    Thanks guys for all the advice.

    I'm still leaning towards Harvard though. I can cross-register with HBS and take a number of MBA classes (hopefully up to 20-25% of all my classes). Given my MSc+MSc in Management + 2.5 years in management consulting, 770 GMAT etc, I think I can still convince an employer that I'm a good business guy.

    The classes at HBS will to some extent give me access to its network and demonstrate interest.

    Tread lightly. Harvard's MBA program is very territorial when it comes to select programs and who gains access to certain alumni groups that involve businesses/Vcap/H-funds etc. If you really want to gain contacts from HBS, just remember that people will say to you a hundred times over, "I'm confused. You're in the MPA program but you want to go into business?" I've seen it happen. Both at Harvard and schools like Northwestern. Be certain to plan your story accordingly.

    "Cut the burger into thirds, place it on the fries, roll one up homey..." - Epic Meal Time

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    k.03's picture

    It's mostly an economics degree.

    Because I am interested in the business side of development and want to learn something new.

    IlliniProgrammer:
    Basically the same deal. If you want to be in business management, why the heck would you get a political science degree?

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    This program seems like a relic of the 1940s-70s when central bank heads were academics.

    If you want to go into economic policy or work at the fed, this would be a good degree, but that's not what you want to do. Since you want to work in VC, I'd definitely steer you away from a macroeconomics master's program.

    Really, unless you want to work at the Fed or the Treasury, this is not the degree for you. You are the only person on this forum who seems to think the MPA is a good idea and continues to insist on it. You've seen several experienced pros in the business world try to dissuade you from this track.

    I just have to ask- did you come here to get advice or have your opinion affirmed?

    Maybe you need to take a step back, assess the situation rationally, and really listen to all of the offline people I'm sure you're getting advice from who are probably telling you to also do the Columbia MBA- which may have been what drove you to seek our affirmation in the first place. As for me, I am not going to affirm what I'm convinced will be seen as a $100K mistake in ten years if your real passion is anything outside the public sector.

  • Getgo's picture
  • numm's picture

    I don't know much about an MPA program (nor the MBA program really) so take my advice with skepticism.

    For the sake of argument, I'm going to go against the grain and somewhat agree with you. Everyone is saying that you should go to business school since you want to do business. Well, the consensus is that going to "business" school doesn't teach you much about running a business in first place, so there goes that argument. It's more about the people that you meet, and is the caliber of students at Columbia MBA really going to be heads and shoulders above that of Harvard Kennedy? In fact, people that were arguing against the Kennedy school mentioned that its students are rich, foreign, and typically end up at high positions in government, central banks, or international organizations. Given that you want to work somewhat internationally, this group of people sounds like a much better connection to make than students at business school, where a majority of students would define success to be making Associate at a bank or a consultant at MBB. Lastly, public policy seems to be what you want to learn. Your career is important, but so is your personal fulfillment.

  • FinancialNoviceII's picture

    OP, I dont get it, you mention that you have done the MSc in Management and dont really want to go through same/or similar aspects in an MBA. Yet you still applied to several by the sounds of it and contemplating going to an M7 school? No expert or anything, but get a clear goal in mind.

    I speak from experience. Went to Oxford for my law degree and did a masters. Started my first job in a law firm and thought, this isnt for me. So I quit. So to sum up, be absolutely sure what you want to do.

    Saying that, I am pursuing an MPP with aspirations to remain in consultancy or possibly work within emerging markets research/strategy. I have admits at several business schools as well so I sympathise with your dilemma.

    Its certainly possible to find positions you mentioned and Harvard is Harvard after all, whether its Divinity or even Extension. But stick with the sure thing. Columbia is a great school so I would perhaps go with that.

    I have an admit at Duke Fuqua for their MMS so likely gonna end up there.

  • In reply to numm
    FinancialNoviceII's picture

    numm:
    I don't know much about an MPA program (nor the MBA program really) so take my advice with skepticism.

    For the sake of argument, I'm going to go against the grain and somewhat agree with you. Everyone is saying that you should go to business school since you want to do business. Well, the consensus is that going to "business" school doesn't teach you much about running a business in first place, so there goes that argument. It's more about the people that you meet, and is the caliber of students at Columbia MBA really going to be heads and shoulders above that of Harvard Kennedy? In fact, people that were arguing against the Kennedy school mentioned that its students are rich, foreign, and typically end up at high positions in government, central banks, or international organizations. Given that you want to work somewhat internationally, this group of people sounds like a much better connection to make than students at business school, where a majority of students would define success to be making Associate at a bank or a consultant at MBB. Lastly, public policy seems to be what you want to learn. Your career is important, but so is your personal fulfillment.

    I agree.

  • In reply to Kenny_Powers_CFA
    veritas14's picture

    Kenny_Powers_CFA:
    IlliniProgrammer:
    Honestly, I would put Moody Bible Institute, Calvin, Hope, and Wheaton above Harvard, Yale, and even Princeton as divinity schools. If you want to be an academic, that's one thing, but if you want to run a megachurch or if you want to really change some lives, you really don't want to go to a "prestige" school.

    I was mostly being glib, and I hear you, though as you note in your post the places you mentioned are exclusively for a specific type of Christian.

    Pfftt... safety schools!

    The real seminary prestige rankings:

    1- The Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Rome)
    2- Pontifical Gregorian University (Rome)
    3- Oxford University - Blackfriars (Oxford)

    ;-)

    *********************************
    "The American father is never seen in London. He passes his life entirely in Wall Street and communicates with his family once a month by means of a telegram in cipher." - Oscar Wilde

  • Brady4MVP's picture

    The OP may be able to take classes at HBS, but he will not have any access to their on-campus recruiting or networking events. Sure, you may be able to make some friends who are students at HBS, but that's about it.

    Given your interests, I have no idea why you want to do an MPA. Columbia MBA is a great program; you will get great opportunities, have access to an awesome network, etc. It seems like you're just stuck on getting a Harvard degree.

  • electriclighto's picture

    In the realm of finance I tend to believe that the MBA has more oomph than MPA (in banking, not so sure about other areas). Even an MBA from a well recognized local school is good to have. An MBA from CBS is even better. A lot of people would love to have CBS on their resume.

  • skkscan's picture

    I was under the impression that SIPA at Columbia was also well respected, and although there is no degree equivalent of an MPA/ID as at HKS, it is among the concentrations that you can choose.
    Have you approached Columbia and Harvard about the dual degree? I'm pretty sure that HKS is open to a remote dual degree, haven't seen anyone at Columbia do it, though.
    I do, however, think that a dual degree is the way to go. And if I had to choose one, I would go with the MBA. The things you say you want to do, it's still within the realm of business, just doing that MPAesque things in the business frame. Even if you end up going the "typical" MBA route post-degree, you'd merely be shifting focus--going from BCG to Bridgespan, switching departments within a large corporation, etc. Even if a non-profit doing mobile health were to seek a candidate, most likely they'll seek someone with industry experience in telecom or healthcare. Also can't disregard the steadily growing popularity of MBAs going into, and being sought out by, the non-profit sector.

  • In reply to veritas14
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    veritas14:
    Pfftt... safety schools!

    The real seminary prestige rankings:

    1- The Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Rome)
    2- Pontifical Gregorian University (Rome)
    3- Oxford University - Blackfriars (Oxford)

    ;-)


    Depends on whether you are a Catholic or a real Christian. ;-)

    Given your interests, I have no idea why you want to do an MPA. Columbia MBA is a great program; you will get great opportunities, have access to an awesome network, etc. It seems like you're just stuck on getting a Harvard degree.

    When, heck, Brady4MVP/JJC is advocating for Columbia over Harvard, the "right" answer is pretty darned clear. If you don't want to work in DC, don't do an MPA.

  • leveredarb's picture

    I really don't understand your goal's, you claim to want to do quant phd level economics, yet come from a background of 4 years of undergrad and masters in bullshit(excuse me management)?

    If those courses are genuinely phd level econometrics focussing on development you will get screwed in more ways than you can imagine.

  • skkscan's picture

    lets also put it this way. many agree that you really don't "learn" much at top business schools. despite this, many of the most successful people between ages 25-30, many of whom have worked in finance to develop some kind of a resume and networks of their own, gladly drop ~$100k (and more, if you include forgone income) for the MBA. it's really all about the job opportunities and career progression--it's just that much harder without.

  • k.03's picture

    I've gone for the MPA/ID because:

    - MBAs aren't as necessary for top management positions in Europe as they are in the US. In fact most top managers/CEOs don't have one
    - Harvard brand much stronger in Europe than Columbia
    - Largest MPA/ID grad employers in the private sector are McK, GS, etc. (35% of MPA/ID graduates go into the private sector, i.e. probably everyone who actually wants to)
    - For those who end up in the private sector, the salaries are the same as for CBS, HBS grads.
    - The MPA/ID is much more international than CBS (70% vs 30%)
    - The content is a lot more interesting for me (and more quantitative, which I like).
    - I'll probably connect better with the HKS crowd.

  • In reply to k.03
    Otter.'s picture

    k.03:
    I've gone for the MPA/ID because:

    - MBAs aren't as necessary for top management positions in Europe as they are in the US. In fact most top managers/CEOs don't have one
    - Harvard brand much stronger in Europe than Columbia
    - Largest MPA/ID grad employers in the private sector are McK, GS, etc. (35% of MPA/ID graduates go into the private sector, i.e. probably everyone who actually wants to)
    - For those who end up in the private sector, the salaries are the same as for CBS, HBS grads.
    - The MPA/ID is much more international than CBS (70% vs 30%)
    - The content is a lot more interesting for me (and more quantitative, which I like).
    - I'll probably connect better with the HKS crowd.

    Congrats on the decision - both of your choices were top notch, so I feel like you really can't go wrong. Just depends on what you feel is best in your gut. I probably would have made the same decision.

    Hi, Eric Stratton, rush chairman, damn glad to meet you.

  • In reply to k.03
    Status_Quo's picture

    k.03:
    I've gone for the MPA/ID because:

    - MBAs aren't as necessary for top management positions in Europe as they are in the US. In fact most top managers/CEOs don't have one
    - Harvard brand much stronger in Europe than Columbia
    - Largest MPA/ID grad employers in the private sector are McK, GS, etc. (35% of MPA/ID graduates go into the private sector, i.e. probably everyone who actually wants to)
    - For those who end up in the private sector, the salaries are the same as for CBS, HBS grads.
    - The MPA/ID is much more international than CBS (70% vs 30%)
    - The content is a lot more interesting for me (and more quantitative, which I like).
    - I'll probably connect better with the HKS crowd.

    Hahah

    http://ayainsight.co/ Curating the best advice and making it actionable.

  • k.03's picture

    Just got a full scholarship for CBS. This could change things.

  • electriclighto's picture

    I would venture to say a full scholarship at CBS on your resume will be far more impressive than Harvard MPA, but that's just my opinion.

  • In reply to veritas14
    SpencerMakesBank's picture

    veritas14:
    Kenny_Powers_CFA:
    IlliniProgrammer:
    Honestly, I would put Moody Bible Institute, Calvin, Hope, and Wheaton above Harvard, Yale, and even Princeton as divinity schools. If you want to be an academic, that's one thing, but if you want to run a megachurch or if you want to really change some lives, you really don't want to go to a "prestige" school.

    I was mostly being glib, and I hear you, though as you note in your post the places you mentioned are exclusively for a specific type of Christian.

    Pfftt... safety schools!

    The real seminary prestige rankings:

    1- The Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Rome)
    2- Pontifical Gregorian University (Rome)
    3- Oxford University - Blackfriars (Oxford)

    ;-)

    My cousin goes to one of those Rome schools.. dude's a friggin genius, kinda sad to see it being wasted on being a priest

  • In reply to SpencerMakesBank
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    SpencerMakesBank:
    My cousin goes to one of those Rome schools.. dude's a friggin genius, kinda sad to see it being wasted on being a priest

    But I was talking about rankings for Christian seminaries, not Catholic ones. ;-) ;-) ;-)

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