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In the first season of Wall Street Warriors Timothy Sykes was having dinner with his buddies and they started talking about "fuck you money" - the amount of money you would need to not have a care in the world and just be able to say fuck you to everyone.

So what is your amount?

I'd say at least 10 million.

Comments (62)

  • Jorgé's picture

    bout tree fiddy

    People like Coldplay and voted for the Nazis, you can't trust people Jeremy

  • LTV's picture

    Honestly, "it's not about the money, it's about the game". The money's only a bonus to keep me motivated while playing.

    When I win, I say fuck you and walk out.

  • CompBanker's picture

    Probably $40 million to $50 million, after tax. I wonder if some of the above posters have an appreciation for how much waking up every day and going to work sucks. It wouldn't take too much for me to throw in the towel and live a life of leisure.

    CompBanker

  • International Pymp's picture

    @compbanker - very true that going to work every day is not ideal at this point, but once you have your first 50million or so (when you said you would retire), then there is no reason to really retire, because work stops sucking... you can join up with a few of your best friends and start your own shop. At that point you'll be respected in the game and know a lot of people and be able to raise yourself a phatty little mid-market fund of 400-800mm... Pay a few super-star senior associates / VPs to do 90% of the dirty work and just sit back and read memos written by your princeton/HBS educated 400k per years slaves... drink a few espressos, peruse the WSJ and get BJ's from your super hot assistant all fucking day... And of course you'll need to do a ton of first class travel, stay in executive suites at the ritz / four seasons and eat dinner out at elegant restaurants with plenty of $500 / bottle wine.... all on your unlimited expense account and for the good of the fund!!! hurray for capitalism and the value of experience... it makes getting old ALMOST not suck.

    I agree that going to work sucks... but once you get to the boss level it stops sucking and starts being awesome... so I have a feeling I'm never going to retire. I'm going to get myself an office like the one Michael Douglass has in The Game and just fucking chill the fuck out and use my insane knowledge and skills to get rich as fuck.

  • In reply to International Pymp
    boutiquebank4life's picture

    International Pymp wrote:
    @compbanker - very true that going to work every day is not ideal at this point, but once you have your first 50million or so (when you said you would retire), then there is no reason to really retire, because work stops sucking... you can join up with a few of your best friends and start your own shop. At that point you'll be respected in the game and know a lot of people and be able to raise yourself a phatty little mid-market fund of 400-800mm... Pay a few super-star senior associates / VPs to do 90% of the dirty work and just sit back and read memos written by your princeton/HBS educated 400k per years slaves... drink a few espressos, peruse the WSJ and get BJ's from your super hot assistant all fucking day... And of course you'll need to do a ton of first class travel, stay in executive suites at the ritz / four seasons and eat dinner out at elegant restaurants with plenty of $500 / bottle wine.... all on your unlimited expense account and for the good of the fund!!! hurray for capitalism and the value of experience... it makes getting old ALMOST not suck.

    I agree that going to work sucks... but once you get to the boss level it stops sucking and starts being awesome... so I have a feeling I'm never going to retire. I'm going to get myself an office like the one Michael Douglass has in The Game and just fucking chill the fuck out and use my insane knowledge and skills to get rich as fuck.

    This is one of the worst posts I've ever read on this site, and on so many levels, the desperation and toolishness, holy crap. Don't edit please I'm linking your post on my fb status as what an insufferable tool you are.

  • International Pymp's picture

    You're a douche bag... without a sense of humor.

    Also I would hope that you realize the inherent irony in calling someone a tool and saying that you're going to "link this to your FB profile" in the same line of speaking. You ought to post that shit on twitter as well, son.

  • drexelalum11's picture

    I agree that I probably won't retire, if for no other reason than that I have no desire to see my children put me in a nursing home. I certainly wouldn't stay in finance that long though - there are plenty of non-profits and other boards you can sit on while still having plenty of time to golf.

  • bulge4lyf's picture

    More.

    I'm talking about liquid. Rich enough to have your own jet. Rich enough not to waste time. Fifty, a hundred million dollars, buddy. A player. Or nothing.

  • Password_Is_Taco's picture

    Seriously, 10 million after taxes. I would earn 5% after taxes a year on it and live as upper middle class in a nice suburban area like Colorado Springs or Dublin Ohio. I would have a Cadillac CTS-V for when its summer and a Fully-loaded F-150 quad cab for the family when it snows. My wife would probably want a G37 coupe. I would fly first class and take trips to nice hotels with my wife and kids. I would educate my kids with the best schools and tutors I can. Most importantly, I would live my life answering to no one and just be happy with a beer in my hand while watching the football game on my big screen in my man cave on Sundays. I would probably get bored eventually and just do philanthropic stuff.

  • In reply to Password_Is_Taco
    MrFuture's picture

    Password_Is_Taco wrote:
    Seriously, 10 million after taxes. I would earn 5% after taxes a year on it and live as upper middle class in a nice suburban area like Colorado Springs or Dublin Ohio. I would have a Cadillac CTS-V for when its summer and a Fully-loaded F-150 quad cab for the family when it snows. My wife would probably want a G37 coupe. I would fly first class and take trips to nice hotels with my wife and kids. I would educate my kids with the best schools and tutors I can. Most importantly, I would live my life answering to no one and just be happy with a beer in my hand while watching the football game on my big screen in my man cave on Sundays. I would probably get bored eventually and just do philanthropic stuff.

    Everyone who has made big money always tells me the same thing: it's easy to make it, but it is tough to keep it.

    For long I did not understand how this could be possible, but with time I started getting it. As humans, especially males, we get bored easily. Our nature, our instinct pushes us to compete, to improve, to constantly change things.
    The idea of retiring at 35 as a millionaire makes no sense. Unless you are dead inside, chances are you won't last more than one year without going crazy. This is why so many people who have made money, suddenly try out new businesses, new ventures....because they get bored, and they feel powerful enough to do whathever they want. That's the tricky part....many fail and their ego pushes them to pour more money into the new business until they
    lose it all.

    Traveling around with wife and kids gets boring after a while, hotels and planes will not feel as exciting as they did when you could not afford them. Now you know them so well you start to compare them to the last time you were in them, and you will become bitchy and critical about it. It is all a mind game....pretty amazing if you ask me.

  • In reply to MrFuture
    konig's picture

    MrFuture wrote:
    Password_Is_Taco wrote:
    Seriously, 10 million after taxes. I would earn 5% after taxes a year on it and live as upper middle class in a nice suburban area like Colorado Springs or Dublin Ohio. I would have a Cadillac CTS-V for when its summer and a Fully-loaded F-150 quad cab for the family when it snows. My wife would probably want a G37 coupe. I would fly first class and take trips to nice hotels with my wife and kids. I would educate my kids with the best schools and tutors I can. Most importantly, I would live my life answering to no one and just be happy with a beer in my hand while watching the football game on my big screen in my man cave on Sundays. I would probably get bored eventually and just do philanthropic stuff.

    Everyone who has made big money always tells me the same thing: it's easy to make it, but it is tough to keep it.

    For long I did not understand how this could be possible, but with time I started getting it. As humans, especially males, we get bored easily. Our nature, our instinct pushes us to compete, to improve, to constantly change things.
    The idea of retiring at 35 as a millionaire makes no sense. Unless you are dead inside, chances are you won't last more than one year without going crazy. This is why so many people who have made money, suddenly try out new businesses, new ventures....because they get bored, and they feel powerful enough to do whathever they want. That's the tricky part....many fail and their ego pushes them to pour more money into the new business until they
    lose it all.

    Traveling around with wife and kids gets boring after a while, hotels and planes will not feel as exciting as they did when you could not afford them. Now you know them so well you start to compare them to the last time you were in them, and you will become bitchy and critical about it. It is all a mind game....pretty amazing if you ask me.

    The most SilverBanana-worthy post I've read today... except Im broke so I can't hand out any :D

    I agree with you... but still, having "f**k you money" sitting aside in a bunch of banks or 15% of it in some boring investment, its a nice feeling.

    Im not planning on retiring at 500 MM...I want moaarr

    Greed is Good.

  • MrFuture's picture

    Biggest mistake rich people do is to become obsessed with flying. Look at how many millionaires die because they crash their own planes.

    Note to self: if one day you make a lot of money, do not act like a douche bag and feel like you can now conquer the skies. DO NOT take flight lessons, and DO NOT fly in private jets, many of them crash. Fly first class, commercial.

  • marcellus_wallace's picture

    You guys should read some of the books on the financial crisis. You think life sucks as an analyst?

    Try to be one of those exec's when shit was going down. Unlike you they were not sleeping because they had work, they were awake because they were about to lose it all.

    There is no such thing as sitting back and letting the $$$ roll in this business.

    As Compbanker said, everyday you go into work sucks. It will now and forever.

  • In reply to marcellus_wallace
    happypantsmcgee's picture

    marcellus_wallace wrote:
    everyday you go into work sucks. It will now and forever.

    Think about that when you go to sleep tonight...

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • Gekko21's picture

    If you need to ask, it means you don't have it.

    "Greed, in all of its forms; greed for life, for money, for love, for knowledge has marked the upward surge of mankind. And greed, you mark my words, will not only save Teldar Paper, but that other malfunctioning corporation called the USA."

  • In reply to happypantsmcgee
    marcellus_wallace's picture

    happypantsmcgee wrote:
    marcellus_wallace wrote:
    everyday you go into work sucks. It will now and forever.

    Think about that when you go to sleep tonight...

    My point got lost. I enjoy going into work everyday. As do most people on here were wired that way.

    I just agree with Compbanker, that getting above 1-100mm figure ain't just sitting back with your buddies and letting all the peons do the work. The leaders of the firm always work more than everyone else. Well good leaders.

  • In reply to Password_Is_Taco
    econ's picture

    Password_Is_Taco wrote:
    Seriously, 10 million after taxes. I would earn 5% after taxes a year on it and live as upper middle class in a nice suburban area like Colorado Springs or Dublin Ohio. I would have a Cadillac CTS-V for when its summer and a Fully-loaded F-150 quad cab for the family when it snows. My wife would probably want a G37 coupe. I would fly first class and take trips to nice hotels with my wife and kids. I would educate my kids with the best schools and tutors I can. Most importantly, I would live my life answering to no one and just be happy with a beer in my hand while watching the football game on my big screen in my man cave on Sundays. I would probably get bored eventually and just do philanthropic stuff.

    +1 (kinda)

    Just like Password_Is_Taco said though, you'd probably get bored. I think that's why you need hobbies and business ventures on the side. Start off with cheap business ventures, so you don't lose too much money, and if you earn some profits, you could up the stakes (slowly).

  • jackilewis's picture

    i think the majority of analysts will never see a net worth of 10 mill at any point in their life. Some will but most wont and thats why its funny to read high school kids shout out amounts north of 50 million. sorry to break it to you son but you will not be the most balling of ballers cause you hooked up an ibanking gig

    also international pimp that was a pretty toolish post .sorry

  • In reply to jackilewis
    blastoise's picture

    jackilewis wrote:
    i think the majority of analysts will never see a net worth of 10 mill at any point in their life. Some will but most wont and thats why its funny to read high school kids shout out amounts north of 50 million. sorry to break it to you son but you will not be the most balling of ballers cause you hooked up an ibanking gig

    also international pimp that was a pretty toolish post .sorry

    never say never this isn't 4chan this is fucking wso where legends are made

  • WallStreetOasis.com's picture

    Never had a fuck you number and still don't.

    I highly recommend anyone who is chasing a number read The Four Hour Work Week.

    Used to work 15-18 hour days, 6-7 days a week regularly....first in investment banking, then private equity+WSO. Then I read The 4 Hour Work Week and realized I just liked being busy, was competitive and a lot of the shit I was doing was inefficient. Now, I am 95% obsolete...assuming I'd be content to let the business grow at a steady clip (which I'm not)...in other words, I could spend 1-2hrs a week, manage WSO and live comfortably if I wanted. (instead, i work closer to 8-10hr days)

    Since I do still have that drive, I'm also going to kill myself working long hours on the launch of jdOasis.com and continue to make WSO the best financial career resource. Will JDO be successful, who knows? But I know I'll have fun trying.

    Maybe my lack of concern will change once my life gets more complicated (wife+kids will come at some point), but I really hope not. The last 3 years of my life have made me realize it's not just the $ in the bank, it's the desire to get up in the morning and the freedom to do whatever you want and go anywhere. Sure, you need the cash flow or a base to get started (and IB is a great bootcamp), but keeping perspective when you're working grueling hours (and working toward some fairytale "retirement status") can be extremely tough. Wow, I still sound bitter even 6 years out.

    So I am not reaching for a number, but for experiences I can look back on and laugh. 30 years old -- not getting any younger...

  • In reply to monty09
    manbearpig's picture

    monty09 wrote:
    40 million... i would first pay for my kids college, give some to my church, then buy my folks a home, take all my close friends on a trip with their families, buy my family a nicer home, wife a whip, me a whip then save the rest...

    Unless you and the wife plan on whipping each other at the same time, can't you just share the whip? lol

    -MBP

  • jonnyseed's picture

    I posted a thread earlier about this scene in Wall Street Warriors. Here is the link to the video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbqBxt9pctM

    You people are starting to sound like these idiots. It's almost like disillusioned people saying "When I win the lottery, I'm going to tell my boss to go fuck himself, and then sail around the world."

    LIke others have said, most of you won't ever touch 8 figures, and probably not even come close. I'm not saying you don't have the ability to do so, but finance is way too competitive and only so many people can get to that point.

    My point is that you this conversation will only bring you down, because once you realize you won't hit that Fuck you goal of $100mm, it somehow means that you failed.

    "Fuck you money" to me means that I can retire someday after I feel that I've worked enough in my life, and I can relax with my family without having to worry about how much I'm spending. The next 30 years or so will dictate what this means.

  • breakinginnew's picture

    I think it's an interesting question and cool to think about, but the problem I see is for most people is that if your number is above the $10m mark or even as high as 50 or 100 you're not really going to be working for someone else...you probably are a partner or have some significant ownership in your company...it's not like you're still an analyst/associate getting railed day in and day out. (I think international pymp's post isn't that bad...not totally unreasonable)

    Knowing that I'd bet most people wouldn't just stop coming into work because they have a significant amount of flexibility in their work. I doubt I could have a number because I wouldn't want to stop working...my view of success is slowly decreasing my working hours over time. Maybe like 20-30 hours of real work a week at 50-60 years old.

  • In reply to jonnyseed
    MrFuture's picture

    jonnyseed wrote:
    "Fuck you money" to me means that I can retire someday after I feel that I've worked enough in my life, and I can relax with my family without having to worry about how much I'm spending. The next 30 years or so will dictate what this means.

    Boooooring......why would anyone want to "retire".....retire from what ? Life ? Living is about doing things, creating, innovating.

    I know a bunch of guys who once they retire at 60, after a few months they go nuts....because they realize they still feel young enough to do stuff.

    The whole retirement concept is what makes people old and depressed.

    I am not saying you gotta work until the end, but you have to be involved in some sort of business....maybe open a restaurant...something...but you can't just stop all of a sudden and just "relax"....relaxing does not have the same flavor if it does not compensate effort and work.

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