7/24/09

Suppose I'm a HYP undergrad philosophy major with no quantitative skills to speak of. How beneficial would it be to put my GMAT score (specifically the quant. score) on the top of my resume if it turns out to be pretty good?

I'm interested in consulting (and possibly S&T) jobs.

Comments (188)

7/24/09

Take the test then we'll talk. How helpful would it be? Hard to quantify. You're at a top target. Granted that you have a strong GPA, no one is going to be judging your intellectual capacity.

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7/24/09

GMAT score alone does not say anything about your quant abilities. You can get 750 scoring q45 v49, which is certainly nothing to brag about in Finance, because q45 is only 92nd percentile.

To show off your quant knowledge, you'd have to score very high on quant section, show the break down, and pray to God that analyst who reads your resume knows the difference between q52 (100th percentile, nearly impossible to get even for math majors) and q50 (5% of all GMAT takers get that or higher).

edit: patekphilippe is correct, q45 is 77th percentile.

7/24/09

Q45 is actually a 72nd or 75th percentile these days. The quant percentiles have been significantly skewed by the massive amounts of Indian/Chinese native test takers over the past decade or so. You need a Q47 or Q48 to even hit the 80th percentile. The Indian/Chinese demographic has also skewed Verbal the other way -- a V42 is around 95th percentile and I think a V46 or V47 is a 99th.

Anyway, I would stray away from putting the GMAT on your resume unless you are applying to top investment banks, consulting firms, etc. where they expect you to leave after 2-3 years. Even with them, I would use discretion.

If you put the GMAT on your resume at other companies, they may be looking for a longer-term hire and they will think that you have your eyes sight on B-School and could leave within a year or two. Offer up your SAT instead. Most people I know do not put their GMAT on their resume before B-School (signals that you might leave) OR after B-School (signals that you're a huge nerd and don't have substantial work experience). They only put it on their resume for the 2 years that they are in B-School.

7/24/09

Well, it's a good question. For HYP undergrad, maybe it won't be that much help, but I would argue that for a non-target student, it could be really helpful. It gives you a credibility factor. Sure you can have a really high GPA, but that alone can be very skewed (rigor of courses) and is sometimes not a good indicator. In those cases, the GMAT will be reasonably representative of your abilities. Also, remember scoring 51 on quant in the GMAT is getting harder by the day (literally). Like patekphilippe said, the indian/chinese test takers have skewed that part of the scoring. q52 is pretty damn tough to get. I know amazing mathematicians (medalists at olympiads and strong contenders for the putnam) that have struggled to get 52 not because the questions are tough, but because there is always some little trick in the question, that you don't bother reading. It's more a matter of attention to detail within a certain time span.

7/25/09

The original poster (me) has a 3.55 GPA and a pretty low SAT math (710). Should I retake the SAT and boost that instead of the GMAT?

Clearly, I feel like I have to show I have quant skills in SOME way.

7/25/09

If you are planning to take the GMAT anyway for B school in the next 5 years, and you score very highly, then it would be perfectly fine (read: it can either help a little, or a lot, or at least not hurt you at all) to put it on your resume. If, however, you have no intention of going to B school, I think it would be a waste of time and money to take the GMAT just to put it on your resume. You have a solid GPA, are graduating from a top Target, and a really solid SAT score, of, what I'm assuming to be, around a 1470 or so (710 math as you said, and 760 verbal - considering you spoke lowly of a 710 in math, I am assuming a 750 or better in verbal), you should be fine. Given your general (educational) stats, you shouldn't have a problem getting some interviews - once you get the interview, however, if you spend the time complaining about your math score, or trying so hard to overly convince everyone that you are a quant head, you will probably blow the opportunity. Just relax and be confident - academically speaking, you are in a position that many others would kill for.

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7/25/09

To echo some of the same sentiments expressed above, a good GMAT score on your resume won't hurt you.

A separate question (albeit in the same vein) is what is the standard way a GMAT score should be conveyed on a resume? Should one include their AWA score if it's above a certain threshold, or not include it at all. Additionally does it help to provide the Q/V breakdown? Obviously there is no "right" answer, but I'd like to hear some input.

Ex:
GMAT: 800 (51Q, 41V, 6.0 AWA)vs
GMAT: 800 (51Q, 41V) vs
GMAT: 800

...or some permutation of your sub-scores...

Cheers,
NVS

7/25/09

I'd leave AWA out. As far q/v, there are no cookie cutters. If v<40, I would not mention it, especially because I am not native American. If v is extremely high and q is low, I would not mention it either.

Bottom line, getting high q involves a lot more logic and understanding than getting high v.

7/25/09

Incidentally, a 47q is no longer good enough to break into the sacred 80/80 club. The GMAT percentile breakdown is changing. Given data I've gathered from some sources, it may shift as frequently as quarterly or month-to-month.

For instance, my husband's quant score more than a year ago was a 46q. It was 80th percentile then. From the scores my friends/colleagues report, a 47q was 80th percentile in February but only 79th percentile in June.

And Patek is right: From the little charts on the official score report, I see that from 42v on up, you gain one percentile point per raw score point. A 46v (and everything above it) is still currently 99th. However, I can tell you that continuing up towards 51v from 46v does dramatically increase the total (v plus q) score. It's hard to gather a ton of data on high scores, but I do know that you will see forty or fifty q-scores that begin with a 5 for every one v-score that does.

Thus, the quant side is much more top-heavy, giving English-speakers a little more room to outperform on the verbal side. Thank God English is still the international language of business, eh?

This bit of GMAT geekery has been brought to you courtesy of the numbers 3, 4, and 5, the external angle Q, and the subjunctive mood.

7/25/09

What's interesting is, while getting q50 is not a big deal for math majors, q52 is ridiculously hard to achieve. There are different strategies of preparation. If student needs high q, he/she has to practice a lot of math questions. If English-speaking student wants high overall score, concentrating on verbal is better.

I think Official Math Guide is useless. Almost all questions from there are below 700 range. Once you get over 700, that's when fun begins (I've heard of very smart math majors spending 5 minutes on last data sufficiency question).

P.S.: I set up a nice RSS Reader that gets PS/DS/CR/RC/SC questions from 3 major GMAT forums (beatthegmat, testMagic, gmatclub). It's great for practicing hard math questions, and if you constantly solve PS/DS questions under 2min, q50 is guaranteed. PM me for links.

7/25/09

Yeah, the 780+ aspirants section on beatthegmat is a reasonably good example of what those types of questions might be.

7/25/09

Mis Ind, or anyone else who wants to chime in, what would you consider a raw score cutoff for including a breakdown? Above 80/80, so 48Q / 37V, or just if your Q is 48+? (My numbers tie to a saved copy of my GMAT score report fyi) And you would or wouldn't include AWA, to prove that you're a "native" English speaker if multilingual? Thanks.

7/25/09

All of this is subjective -- you gotta understand your audience and tailor your resume for that audience. There are some situations in which you probably don't want to put great test scores on your resume.

For instance, I once interviewed a recently-laid-off guy with a 780 GMAT on his resume. We were worried about the guy's willingness to make a multiple-year commitment to the position and that he was only talking to us because he desperately needed a job for a year. I said, "Hey, when did you take your GMATs?" He said, "Oh, a while back -- 2-3 years, I think." So of course I said, "Oh, so they'll be expiring pretty soon. Doesn't it hurt to think about such a great score expiring unused? You could easily get into Wharton or Harvard." There was a brief pause, and then he said, "Well, I don't think I'm really necessarily a business-school kind of guy."

The pause told me everything I needed to know. A Wall Street guy who put in the time to get a 780 (and who still hesitates at the idea of not using it) would have to work pretty hard to convince me that he "wasn't a business-school kind of guy".

Also, putting your test scores on your resume can sometimes look like a dick move in places where everybody's both smart and laid back. After all, you don't want to work with some asshole who won't let you forget his 1600 SAT or 780 GMAT. And of course, in many environments it's a time-honored and 100% valid way to show your stuff. I think the more formal and competitive the environment, the more likely it is that putting recent high test scores on your resume will score you points.

So in my opinion, if it's a resume geared for Wall Street and the GMAT is a 750 or 760, I would go for it -- but I personally would not state the breakdown unless it said things about me that I really wanted to say. A breakdown reveals your strength, but it also reveals your weakness.

For the AWA, a 6.0 is in the 87th percentile. If I was applying for a role that required significant written communication, I would include a 6.0 (but would not include a 5.5) on the resume. That's just me, though.

7/25/09

So for MBB: put it on resume or no? I assume they are more formal firms.

7/25/09

God you're on point (as per the usual). Thanks for spelling it out for us idiots.

5/30/10

Very helpful thread.

I'm currently polishing my CV. I'm going to apply to an event which basically involves me getting to interact with bankers from all the big BB firms (really hope I get in). I needed to do the GMAT to be admitted to the master's program that I start in September.

I have 2 questions:
- Where do I list my GMAT score? I'm thinking of putting "GMAT: xxx" right under the master's item on the education section.
- How do I list the master's program? I begin the program in the future (September), but I was admitted, etc. Do I just list the estimated beginning and ending dates?

Thanks

5/30/10

The CFA L2 is fine, but don't put the GMAT.

Here's the risk of putting the GMAT score down. It's going to indicate that you want to do B-school sooner vs. later. Bear in mind it takes about 18 months to 2 years to settle into any position. Also, at most companies a new hire costs about $250K for that first year and it's going to take about 2 years for them to make that money back from you. That's the cost of recruiting, your salary, your bonus, your benefits, internal training, "ramp up" time, time to productivity etc. A company is going to hesitate making an investment in you when you've given them a signal that your intention might be to bail in 2 years.

On the recruiting side for lateral hires, I'm privy to this "pause" on candidates all the time. My advice to you is don't mention B-school, don't put the GMAT score down. Keep that to yourself. Don't shoot yourself in the foot. Focus on getting the job. Then once you're IN, start making your plans discretely. One foot out, one foot in...

5/30/10

I have been told in the past that putting your GMAT score on your resume is advisable when targeting S&T, AM, MC, and ER. A 750 GMAT score is in the top 5 percentile and is indicative of both his quantitative ability and his ability to communicate well. Most IBs know and expect that analysts will leave after a 2-3 stint and the desire to matriculate into a top B-school program does not reflect poorly on the candidate. In fact, it demonstrates his preparedness and focus not to mention the fact that it takes a high degree of initiative to prepare for the GMAT and do well. I would absolutely put a 750 on my resume; just not in bright orange.

5/30/10

Do not put down GMAT scores.
Everyone knows they are good for five years. Shows your intent to go to B-school in near future.
Will open up questions as to future goals-and could show lack of commitment to new position.

5/30/10

I think it would depend on where you apply. IB, MC, and most professional service firms generally expect people to work two years and then go either into industry or to b-school. It gives them more connections - or as MC firms call it, "alumni."

But if you get a corporate job at, say, a Fortune 500, then they would expect you to stay for the long(ER)-term because they've invested in you and want you to work up the ranks.

5/30/10

It's a culture thing because IB/MC firms invest more in you than any corporate gig but the lifestyle is too brutal to maintain. But yeah, put it on for your IB/MC resume definitely.

5/30/10
curiousG:

I've been out of school for almost 5 years and decent / interesting work experience for the past 5 years (though nothing directly related to finance). I'm trying to switch industry and get into finance now (hopefully PE).

uh...yeah...good luck with that mate.
What makes you think you have a prayer? Not putting you down- maybe you know something I don't.

5/30/10

No offense bro, but you can basically forget PE. Guys with PE and BB IBD experience are struggling to get those jobs right now.

If you have been out of school for 5 years and have a 720, go to B-School.

To answer the original question, 720 is resume worthy. 700 & above is considered an excellent score. However, it may be considered odd for someone several years out of school, and who is not currently in school, to put it on. Then again, you need every bullete you got.

5/30/10

Thanks both for replying.

Yeah, I fully understand how bad the job market is right now and as joemontana said, even IB/PE experienced guys struggle to land a job.

Well, obviously I'm not targeting at any mega funds or such... some small regional firms. Still, I know I got a very slim change, but well, it wouldn't hurt to try, so....

I will definitely think of MBA route, too.

Thanks all.

5/30/10

curiousG... take everything here with a grain of salt and realize that while the advice and opinions you hear here may be true, most of it will come from people who are still in undergrad, and not even about to start their full time jobs yet.

5/30/10

Thanks youngmoney.

Replies I get on this board, whatever kind of advice/input/suggestion may be, I appreciate them all, and yes I am taking everything with a grain of salt.

It is true though that it is one of the toughest job markets out there right now and to make things worse, I don't have perfect credentials (not even close) PE employers/recruiters are looking for. But I wanna go into PE "eventually", b'cause I'm genuinely interested... so I think I will still give my best shots at small firms and hope for the best.

Thanks again.

5/30/10

Please elaborate on your level of interest in PE considering you have a non-finance related background. I feel like a lot of people are swayed by the prestige (to the extent that it still exists...amidst the slowdown in deal flow, general inability to finance deals and portfolio blow-ups due to overleverage and poor operating performance). Not to discourage you as PE has been extremely fascinating and intellectually challenging (esp in this environment)

If I were you I would include my GMAT score on my resume and consider b-school as a means of changing careers and hiding from the storm...best of luck to you

5/30/10

I would certainly say it is fine to include, but I agree with the general sentiment that getting in to PE now will be hard, and would suggest B school as a way to attempt a transition. Of course, it also matters what your 5 years of work experience are - things could be quite different depending on what that work experience was.

5/30/10

its tough right now for even greater qualified applicants to get into PE, def. go to B-School, and work from there. Good Luck!

5/30/10

thade, you are 17 years old and in high school. why are you even trying to give advice?

a great example of why all advice on this forum should be taken with a grain of salt

5/30/10

Thade, keep up the good work if you're really in HS. focus on getting an internship every summer of school and you'll soon be a baller. I wish I was as motivated as you when I was 16 in HS.

5/30/10

Wow, he really is in high school. Astounding! They keep getting younger and younger on here... way to fuel the type-A personalities by joining while in HS.

5/30/10

Hopefully we can get some middle schoolers on here soon asking if mowing lawns or babysitting will look better for bulge bracket recruiting

5/30/10

GeneralThade, what the hell are you doing on this board ? You should be out there getting laid

5/30/10

lol, I actually joined WSO in high school too, but didn't have 74 posts like GeneralThade

5/30/10

I am interested in investment banking, and therefore there is no greater place to speak with like minded individuals. My posts have always been helpful and come from only the knowledge I currently possess, I don not give false advice, nor ask questions such as "What kind of ice cream do bankers eat?" or any other irrelevant questions. Just trying to learn.

5/30/10
GeneralThade:

I am interested in investment banking, and therefore there is no greater place to speak with like minded individuals. My posts have always been helpful and come from only the knowledge I currently possess, I don not give false advice, nor ask questions such as "What kind of ice cream do bankers eat?" or any other irrelevant questions. Just trying to learn.

What knowledge DO you currently possess?

5/30/10
ideating:
GeneralThade:

I am interested in investment banking, and therefore there is no greater place to speak with like minded individuals. My posts have always been helpful and come from only the knowledge I currently possess, I don not give false advice, nor ask questions such as "What kind of ice cream do bankers eat?" or any other irrelevant questions. Just trying to learn.

What knowledge DO you currently possess?

The only posts I respond to are the ones I have some knowledge on, for example places to live in ny. I from ny. Any post that is opinion orientated such as " What should happen to Madoff", and othe such questions. I would never pretend to know something I don't like "What flavor of ice cream do ibankers like?" since I am not a banker yet. If anyone cares to know however as a student, I enjoy mint chocolate chip. I hope this satisfies your voir dire.

5/30/10
GeneralThade:
ideating:
GeneralThade:

I am interested in investment banking, and therefore there is no greater place to speak with like minded individuals. My posts have always been helpful and come from only the knowledge I currently possess, I don not give false advice, nor ask questions such as "What kind of ice cream do bankers eat?" or any other irrelevant questions. Just trying to learn.

What knowledge DO you currently possess?

The only posts I respond to are the ones I have some knowledge on, for example places to live in ny. I from ny. Any post that is opinion orientated such as " What should happen to Madoff", and othe such questions. I would never pretend to know something I don't like "What flavor of ice cream do ibankers like?" since I am not a banker yet. If anyone cares to know however as a student, I enjoy mint chocolate chip. I hope this satisfies your voir dire.

I enjoy mint chocolate chip also, and I am a banker. In all seriousness, I didn't even know what IB was until I was a sophmore in college. Good luck in college.

5/30/10

What's with the moronic "getting laid posts"? Can this guy not spend 10 mins of his time asking questions while still maintaining a social life?

5/30/10

The only posts I respond to are the ones I have some knowledge on, for example places to live in ny. I from ny. Any post that is opinion orientated such as " What should happen to Madoff", and othe such questions. I would never pretend to know something I don't like "What flavor of ice cream do ibankers like?" since I am not a banker yet. If anyone cares to know however as a student, I enjoy mint chocolate chip. I hope this satisfies your voir dire.

they should have an age requirement for wsoasis registration so that you couldn't openly be some high school kid. I'm sure you can understand why people would be annoyed by your presence. (I'm in college myself but at least I have BB internship experience, at an ivy league with good recruiting, and know a few BB analysts as friends-- and TEND to only reply to general economic/policy debate posts or internship/recruiting posts ) IF you ever become a banker you are still a very long way from it. First get into a decent school or get decent internship experience.

5/30/10

Seriously, we're picking on GeneralThade for being in HS? It isn't like he is spitting knowledge - I was definitely interested in investment banking in HS, and I think many other members of this board were, and I'm sure all of us feel that having a resource like WSO at that point in our life could have been very helpful. That said, if you are in HS, don't view this as my endorsing your acting stupid, or asking fifty times in computer science is a good major, before ever taking a college course. As evidenced by many members of this board though, high schoolers hardly have a monopoly on stupidity.

5/30/10

710 is a solid score put it on. Anything 700+ is awesome. Don't give them the breakdown though its unnecessary.

5/30/10

Solid score, but don't mention 44q.

5/30/10

I was about to post about the exact same topic, so this is useful, but I have a follow-up.

I scored 50 on Q should that be added to the resume? What if I am applying to a quant heavy job?

Thanks for the advice.

5/30/10

A 710 is definitely a strong score and it is perfectly reasonable to put it on your resume. In terms of breaking out the V and Q scores, I would not unless you scored a 99th percentile in 1 of the 2 (since if you scored 99 in both you'd have the 800). In other words, if you got a 720 with a 50 Q and a 4X in verbal, I would put the 720 down, but neither the Q nor V breakout. If, however, you got a 720 with a 51 Q, then I would put both the overall and the Q breakout (especially if applying for a quant-intensive position). Different people will suggest different things about breakout scores, but an overall score of 700 or better is good enough for the resume, but there is no need for a breakout unless you scored 99th percentile in one of the two (and usually I would focus on the Q more than the V, unless you are not native English, as Q is more important to our collective lines of work).

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5/30/10

MoneyKingtom, IBanker is correct.

I have a friend who can score over 700 GMAT tomorrow if he wants: his quant score will be horrible, but his verbal will be in 99.5 percentile, that will pull his overall score over 700 mark.

Banks could careless about your verbal score if your quant score is horrible. A lot of Finance schools dont care about verbal as long as it's reasonable, but they all want to see high quant scores (50,51, or 52). Here is breakdown:
50q is 95%
51q is 99%
52q is 100% (I know only one person who got it)

5/30/10

don't put it on the resume unless you get 750

5/30/10

^^^^^^^^^^^ rubbish

if you get a 700+, put it on

anything below, leave it off

5/30/10

I wouldnt put a 700 on my resume for a pre-MBA position. 700 is a solid score but I dont think it warrants being put on your resume.

5/30/10

700 is on the cusp of being a great score

it won't hurt you to put it on the resume, recruiters will look favorably on it, not as favorably as 750, but still they'll know you are smart

5/30/10

any love for a 730?

5/30/10
bigmonkey31:

any love for a 730?

I put it on my resume. Seems to get love.

5/30/10
whateverittakes:
bigmonkey31:

any love for a 730?

I put it on my resume. Seems to get love.

Ditto, this and passing L I of the CFA are the only reason mine gets love, it sucks otherwise

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5/30/10

Hey, more than anything about your academic skills, your GMAT tells PE firms that you want to go to b-school, so if they hire you, it'll be as another data monkey who is going to slave away for them. Do well your first year at your BB and then start networking.

5/30/10

Generally, PE firms don't care about the GMAT. But if you want feedback on the score - it is average. Nothing outstanding. So I would not put it.

5/30/10

By definition, your GMAT is not average, the opinions of those too young to drink notwithstanding. A quarter of the 2011 MBA class at both HBS and Wharton scored below 700, and there is someone at HBS with a 490. So let's not pretend like everyone walking those campuses has a 780. The criteria we were given is to include it if your GMAT is above the average of the class. By that criteria (or median since that's what those 2 schools list on their websites), you should list it.

I agree that it does communicate that you intend on pursuing business school so be sure you are ok with communicating that message.

5/30/10

I wanna meet the dude with a 490 at Harvard. Holy shit. God Bless him!

5/30/10
Anthony .:

I wanna meet the dude with a 490 at Harvard. Holy shit. God Bless him!

I highly doubt it is a dude...it has to be a chick. They have small brains so it stands to reason their scores would be lower. Really, their brains are a third the size of ours. It's science.

To the OP: I would find the time to retake the test as soon as you can. Most people (from what I hear) score higher the second time around because they have a better concept of time, etc when taking the test again which can greatly impact your confidence/score, etc.

Regards

"The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
- Ronald Reagan

5/30/10

If you're applying to megafunds, I would not put it on the resume. It is definitely no better than average for associates at these firms.

5/30/10

490 at HBS??? What did he do? Cure AIDS and Cancer at the same time while developing a pill that turns ugly fat girls into supermodels?

5/30/10

490 - influential politician/businessmen's son/daughter i'd guess.

5/30/10

I would guess it's an international student with exceptional non-GMAT accomplishments and likely had a terrible Q/V split (in favor of Q obviously).

5/30/10

what's resume-worthy for PE shops? i feel that ppl at good shops def. have the ability to pump out good GMAT scores if they went that route... seems like you need 99% to put on your resume?

5/30/10

720 isn't good? shit... tough crowd

i guess i have to keep studying cause if i get a 720 apparently im trailer trash lol

looking for that pick-me-up to power through an all-nighter?
5/30/10

720 isn't good? shit... tough crowd

i guess i have to keep studying cause if i get a 720 apparently im trailer trash lol

If that is the case, I'm technically the guy just renting the trailer at the park, lol.

Regards

"The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
- Ronald Reagan

5/30/10

720 is totally fine for your resume. If not a way to show how awesome you are, its at least a "check-box."

5/30/10

I think its a good score, but you have to think about whether or not you want to convey the message that you might leave for business school. Although, you could explain it away by saying you took it as a fall back for the bad job market, etc.

Regards

"The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
- Ronald Reagan

5/30/10

Hello
You do realize that a lot of companies ask for GMAT scores during the recruiting process. If you have a good score it is in the education section and it doesnt even add a line typically. Having read through resume books for several top 10 schools it is an extremely common thing to see...so I assume the career service department tells you to do it and where to put it.

Hope this Helps
Thanks
http://www.fintel.us/

5/30/10

anything over 700 can go on the resume

5/30/10

what kind of chances you have with a 700?

5/30/10

I agree. 700 or better and it goes on the resume.

Hansolo, you're going to have to be more specific

5/30/10

It can go on the CV, as it's not terrible, but what exactly do you expect it to accomplish? No one will look at it and be impressed, so what value is it adding?

5/30/10

I love this forum "720 GMAT, you're a fucking idiot!" "500k a year, thats for chumps." haha such a great way to break up the day

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

5/30/10

After you leave your first job post-MBA. Keep it on there for when you are looking for your second gig after MBA.

5/30/10

Over 9000.

5/30/10

I meant numeric cutoff. I'm studying for it now for the MSF.

5/30/10

700 and below is a no-go

5/30/10

790+

5/30/10

Definitely 700+

5/30/10

Yep, 700+

5/30/10

700 and 700+

5/30/10

no.

5/30/10

I think if you are looking to stay in consulting, especially on the MBB type level you should leave it on there. Isn't that one of the screens they use to hire right out of MBA? Which would mean they obviously find it important.

5/30/10

He's already at MBB...

5/30/10

You really shouldn't have your GMAT or GPA on your resume at this point - if you have honors (ie: Phi Beta Kappa, Baker Scholar at HBS) then those can go on your resume in the Education section, otherwise your work experience should be the highlight.

5/30/10

i wouldnt....its best to say it on your cover letter that you are eligble for consideration for an ivey league. and thats to say the place you are applying for is interested in you getting your MBA. they may be relunctant to finance it or have you think they will finance it or that you will be leaving them soon to pursue the MBA. so apply the comment on a case by case basis.

5/30/10

I definitely think its a good idea. It shows your smart and is probably good in comparison to your other activities

5/30/10

couldn't hurt

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yes.

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I would leave off.. if I see a GMAT on a pre MBA resume i toss... if score is stong they will be leaving to b school in a few years. Waste of my time

on a side note.. we dont have an analyst program.. you are hired directly on to desk

5/30/10
monty09:

I would leave off.. if I see a GMAT on a pre MBA resume i toss... if score is stong they will be leaving to b school in a few years. Waste of my time

on a side note.. we dont have an analyst program.. you are hired directly on to desk

This

You don't want your potential employer to know that you can leave at the drop of a hat. You want them to think that you're a team player, willing to get their feet wet in the industry, roll up their sleeves and give 110% (insert more office-speak as needed).

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^^well said. Or they will wonder why the hell take the GMAT if you are not going to b-school

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I got a CV one with a LSAT score... I called to talk to the guy and asked why it was on there... was quite funny

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depends on where you're applying to. mid-sized PE and large-cap PE will not mind. Just another data poitn for them

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Hmm.. thanks everyone..

As mentioned i will be applying to top consulting
firms..

For those who are against it, the question is bigger firms ask for it in their wesbsite app. as well.. so are they not already trying to differentiate me on the basis of my score...

But of course, they will be skeptical while taking an MBA prospect..!!

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Yes you should put it

I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

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I've seen MBA students putting GMAT on their resumes, but not undergrad kids. For IBD, I don't think they would care, given that it would probably be one of the natural progressions anyway. For everything else...I personally would leave it off.

I'm kind of curious myself though.

Under my tutelage, you will grow from boys to men. From men into gladiators. And from gladiators into SWANSONS.

5/30/10

I've heard it can help offset low GPA, SAT, etc. Shows that you actually know what you're talking about and are not a slacker. But your concern seems reasonable, I just have never heard it before.

Reality hits you hard, bro...

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depends on the industry and also the company....e.g. generally hedge fund = no while consulting = yes...comes down to what the expectations are for work there...

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Agree with MittRomney. In industries where it is expected you'll get your MBA, it can be a real plus, especially if your resume is otherwise pretty weak in academics.

CompBanker

5/30/10

Yes, definitely add it - helped me out when I was in your position

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Good to know. I'm studying for 3 months now shooting for a low-to-mid 700 with the expectation that I will be going to B-school within the next 5 years but I need to offset my 2.9-3.0 undergrad GPA.

My name is Nicky, but you can call me Dre.

5/30/10

Look, the GMAT is not going to make or break your resume.
But if you have 700+, definitely put it in somewhere (GMAT: 7X0 takes a very small space, after all).
On occasions, I've received comments on the good gmat score, but it was definitely not something they focused on.

5/30/10

anything over 700 puts you in the 92+% so I would say put it if you scored at or above 700

"Life all comes down to a few moments. This is one of them." - Bud Fox

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700, and put the breakdown if youre above 80 80 split i think

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575

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I beat 700 but I prefer not to put academic stats at all.

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730-740+ and only if you are actually in b-school

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Perhaps in the U.S. - in europe there are several MSc which require you to take the GMAT, so it doesn't automatically imply "I want to do an MBA"

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Yes, this is verrrry common. In fact, during the interview process at most PE / HFs they will ask you what they were if they don't see it on your resume.

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I assume you did well? A good score can probably only help you.

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Thanks for you response.
Yes, I did very well and hoped it might help offset other slightly weaker parts of my application.

Can I put it under university/education or would you put it less prominently at the bottom?

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.

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I applied for consultancy internships in Europe and put my GMAT score on my resume. My interviewers mentioned that I'd done very well on it, so I'd say it's okay list it. I put mine at the bottom under test scores and certifications, but that's just what I thought best.

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Why did you take the GMAT? If you do two years of IB and two years of PE, you will have to retake it (assuming you are a junior).

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GMAT score lasts for 5 years and 2/3 year as an analyst and then I would want to go for MBA.

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Why not?

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The reason why I ask that is because I read in an article that it may discourage recruiters from hiring you because it suggests that I am not going to be a long term investment and want to go to business school anyways?....? Any other suggestions?

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If you do banking/PE/consulting, you are almost expected to go to business school to progess

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This is discussed a lot, and I think it comes down using your own judgement, but here's my $0.02... If I were to score a 730 or better, I might be tempted to put it on my resume. 750+ yeah, I would. Also, many online applications have a place for you to submit test scores.

Go to gmatclub.com and click on some of the top programs on the main page. You'll see charts of self-submitted user stats. If believed to be accurate, you'll see a lot of people break 700. You might also ask this question there.

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^ Bingo

"Those who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin

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From my experience it helps a bit

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dinomonster:
I've heard mixed opinions on this. If I take the GMAT during college, is it helpful in any way to put in on your undergraduate resume?

I am looking into consulting or finance(i-banking).

For consulting or banking, I don't see how an impressive score would be a bad thing (it shows that you're intelligent, and signals that you might get into a great business school after your analyst stint). All of these organizations thrive on brand/prestige, so sending a large number of their junior nerds off to HBS every year means that everyone wins.

For certain traditional companies, however, I'd be wary about letting them know that you've already taken the GMAT (companies that aren't as "tracked," who might not be happy about a new employee leaving after 2-5 years).

5/30/10

I haven't seen any job postings that require a minimum SAT score. not to say it wouldn't come up in an interview.

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JrMistMaker:

While I think that a test I took in 2005 is not even closely indicative of my intelligence, I fully acknowledge that my SAT scores suck (650M 600V). On top of not going to a target school, I feel as though my SAT score is holding me back as I constantly see job postings that say "SAT scores under 1400 will not be considered" etc.

I am sure there are several other things that can nix me from an interview list but would taking the GMAT help improve how you are viewed by a fund? I originally planned to take it 2 years ago but never got around to sitting for the exam. My practice tests were all mid-high 700's so I am very confident I would achieve a high score..

You've actually seen postings that stated clear cut SAT cutoffs? Seems like that's the sort of thing that might get a company into legal trouble.

5/30/10

Below is the example that lead to the post, but yeah I see it frequently; mostly when applying through recruiters.

"Highly qualified candidates must have a quantifiable track record of success as measured by an SAT of 1400 or better or an ACT score of 30..."
http://www.robinjudsonpartners[dot]com/job-board/206

5/30/10

Odd that SAT scores are on any kind of job posting. I feel like after UG no one cares about the SAT. Take the GMAT, replace the SAT on your resume which shouldn't probably be on there anyway (respectfully). I would put any score above a 700 on the resume, shows initiative and that you are educationally minded

"I am not sure who this 'Anonymous' person is - one thing is for certain, they have been one hell of a prolific writer" - Anonymous

5/30/10

GoHuskies:

Odd that SAT scores are on any kind of job posting. I feel like after UG no one cares about the SAT.

Quite the opposite if you are in high finance. When going through PE / HF recruiting, every recruiter will ask for your SAT score, and a lot of funds / firms will expect to see it on your resume, or will ask directly (this actually happened in an interview). Most won't specify a cutoff, but the general rule is as OP stated, >1400 (old scale) and you're fine, lower than that and you have some explaining to do.

I share the frustration with this test following you around. I grew up in a town where SAT prep was almost unheard of, so I took no prep classes, no practice tests, just showed up on test day and took it. I got a 1330, which in my mind at the time was not half bad. I had no idea at age 17 that future employers were going to look at this as a barometer of my capabilities 8 years later.

If you think you can clear a 700 on the GMAT, I would take it and put the score on your resume (most recruiters will also ask for this score on your intake form so add it there too, or make sure they know). Dropping a 760 onto your resume in place of a 1200ish SAT score could definitely bump you up a tier in the eyes of the recruiters and your future employers.

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labanker:

GoHuskies:

Odd that SAT scores are on any kind of job posting. I feel like after UG no one cares about the SAT.

Quite the opposite if you are in high finance. When going through PE / HF recruiting, every recruiter will ask for your SAT score, and a lot of funds / firms will expect to see it on your resume, or will ask directly (this actually happened in an interview). Most won't specify a cutoff, but the general rule is as OP stated, >1400 (old scale) and you're fine, lower than that and you have some explaining to do.

I share the frustration with this test following you around. I grew up in a town where SAT prep was almost unheard of, so I took no prep classes, no practice tests, just showed up on test day and took it. I got a 1330, which in my mind at the time was not half bad. I had no idea at age 17 that future employers were going to look at this as a barometer of my capabilities 8 years later.

If you think you can clear a 700 on the GMAT, I would take it and put the score on your resume (most recruiters will also ask for this score on your intake form so add it there too, or make sure they know). Dropping a 760 onto your resume in place of a 1200ish SAT score could definitely bump you up a tier in the eyes of the recruiters and your future employers.

Darn it labanker, my SAT is in the same boat, I think I got a 1350 and was happy since I had the same prep as you (see: 0). Very suprised to hear that my SAT score might come rearing its ugly heada in a future job interview

"I am not sure who this 'Anonymous' person is - one thing is for certain, they have been one hell of a prolific writer" - Anonymous

5/30/10

I don't think a GMAT would really help with a interview, maybe if its 760 or above, but could not hurt

"I am not sure who this 'Anonymous' person is - one thing is for certain, they have been one hell of a prolific writer" - Anonymous

5/30/10

A high GMAT score would probably help a little bit, but wouldn't override education or work exp. I guess you could take it--it couldn't hurt, esp if you post a mid-high 700s. I guess a better question is whether that's the best use of your time.

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It can't hurt you man.

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750+ would help a bit, not a game changer but a small help.

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Is a 710 good enough to put on a resume for FT recruiting? I got around 1900 on SAT and don't go to a top school.

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SAT is still important in finance. I've seen guys who are 30+ years old get asked about their SAT scores. Pretty ridiculous.

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its not that ridiculous to be honest given that its the one indicator that's comparable across everyone and probably the best proxy of intelligence on your resume, altough GMAT may be more reasonable than SAT and there are still major issues with them.

Its tough to say but id probably rather hire a 800GMAT from Jefferies than a 660 from GS TMT.

710 GMAT on resume I dont know depends on your target really, if your aim is top end pe/hf probably leave it off cuz 710 won't impress anyone...

5/30/10

On the flip side, putting a GMAT score on your resume could tell them that you are either planning on going to b-school in a year and will thus jump ship right when you are becoming prodcutive, or that you applied to b-schools and couldn't get in anywhere.

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Hurt

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Depends on the level of competition within your field, really. I would equate it to a GPA of maybe 3.3 or about a 1250 SAT (old test), though I have no % breakdown to back that up or anything...just my initial perception. If you would list the above numbers on your resume, then I would list the GMAT too. If you are applying for a very competitive field like IB or MC, I would leave it off, because it won't really wow anyone, and just says that you are already thinking about B-school.

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It is in the 78th percentile

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I wouldn't.

Under my tutelage, you will grow from boys to men. From men into gladiators. And from gladiators into SWANSONS.

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78% percentile won't help you if you're shooting for the traditional paths in finance.

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I would not since it's not as good. Above 700 would be acceptable from what I've read so far.

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Beny23:

I would not since it's not as good. Above 700 would be acceptable from what I've read so far.

Sorry to go off on a tangent here, but I think it's amazing that from the perspective of trying to get into finance program that a score like 650 on the GMAT really isn't that great. A 700 on the GMAT equates to being in the top 90th percent of all test takers, yet it's very low for being considered good for the perspective MBA hopes of getting into finance.

Personally, I took the GRE to get into the masters program I'm in now. I got into the 70 percentile, which I thought was pretty decent considered I did zero studying and finished the test an hour early (couldn't care less what my score was). My friend, who also is in the program now, got a score in the 15 percentile. Yeah, 15%. I felt bad for her, but it's not like she had to get a perfect score to get in.

I do agree though, while 650 on the GMAT is far from terrible, it's also not stellar enough to list on a resume IMO. On a one-page resume, space is valuable real estate, and there's a number of other things you can put on there that would be far better to catch someone's attention than your GMAT score would.

5/30/10

You guys are missing the point ENTIRELY.

So basically you will be applying to jobs until you decide you want to retake it and get an MBA? In ither words you're basically advertising the fact that you want a job, but from the start are telling employers you are already NOT planning to devote yourself for very long? Why the fuk would I hire you?!!!?!

It's lose lose lose. A Low score means you're an idiot. An ok score means you are so desperate to beef up your resume that your experience must not be that good. A great score makes me wonder wtf is making you wait to apply to MBA programs....

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CreditAnalyst85:

You guys are missing the point ENTIRELY.

So basically you will be applying to jobs until you decide you want to retake it and get an MBA? In ither words you're basically advertising the fact that you want a job, but from the start are telling employers you are already NOT planning to devote yourself for very long? Why the fuk would I hire you?!!!?!

It's lose lose lose. A Low score means you're an idiot. An ok score means you are so desperate to beef up your resume that your experience must not be that good. A great score makes me wonder wtf is making you wait to apply to MBA programs....


Great points, but I would add that some programs don't expect you to stay longer than 2 year (ie. private equity and maybe banking). If I were an interviewer though, I would keep an open mind because I get the fact that it gives you options. You don't necessarily have to go to b-school because you took the GMAT, and if you got a really high score, that would give me more comfort about your intelligence or work ethic.
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So in this case I am already in a MAcc program which means that they will assume that I only took it for the MAcc and by not putting it on, they are already assuming that I took it and that my score was too low to put on my resume. So as far as worrying about them thinking that I am planning on getting an MBA down the road, I don't think that would be as big of an issue.

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People rarely put their gmat score on their resume anyhow, so this shouldn't be an issue. I would just leave it off.

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In general, I'd say that's too low to put on your resume. Most people will care more about what you actually did in school. That score's not good enough to brag about or to voluntarily tell people about.

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Don't. Think about this: How many people with less than 650s will put it on their resume? (virtually nobody), how many with higher than 650s? (Anyone higher than 700). So you are just putting one more thing on your resume that you will likely lose when comparing head to head for jobs.

I have a score similar to yours and left it off. If someone asks in an interview (it might happen) simply explain it like you would a bad GPA. DONT make excuses about it because you want to show responsibility for your work but DO stress that the score isn't reflective of your true abilities

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This is not a score that should be posted. However, If you have an extremely high GPA, Merit scholarship, Honors etc be sure to include.

Carol Grayson

5/30/10

Agreed. Do not put it on the resume. I followed a very similar path to the one you are describing. A 650 got me a scholarship at one the nation's top MAcc programs, which I attended. Throughout the OCR process, I never once disclosed or mentioned my score. I had no problem securing all Big 4 offers I pursued, but IB and strat. consulting were a distant dream (unless you count PwC Advisory).

Fast forward, I retook the GMAT before applying to MBA programs, scored a 750, and made into a top 5 MBA program. Now my score sits at the top of the resume. You can certainly improve your score in the coming years, but for now I wouldn't advertise it.

"Just go to the prom and get your promotion. That's the way the business world works. Come on, Keith!" - The Boss

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700 or higher

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Absolutely not. As a general rule i wouldn't put gmat score on a resume unless it's 730+. At the top schools, career services often tell students to not put it on unless it's 760+.

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mbavsmfin:

Absolutely not. As a general rule i wouldn't put gmat score on a resume unless it's 730+. At the top schools, career services often tell students to not put it on unless it's 760+.

Brady is going to be and adcom some day. Think about it.

5/30/10

mbavsmfin:

Absolutely not. As a general rule i wouldn't put gmat score on a resume unless it's 730+. At the top schools, career services often tell students to not put it on unless it's 760+.

I don't think there is a definitive cutoff point at which you should put it on or leave it off your resume. I think people should consider the types of jobs they are looking for and the average score of a person seeking that position -- if your score is higher than the average, put it on the resume. Alternatively, consider putting it on your resume if your score is above your school's average and leave it off if it is below the school's average.

CompBanker

5/30/10

swissstud:

I'm gonna soon send out a dozen finance internship applications. Can I put my GMAT score in my CV in the language/diploma section? Or is it for some reason frowned upon?

The GMAT is a much bigger thing in the US, I'm not sure how "well known" it is in Switzerland but I got a pretty decent score (680) so I thought I could put it in. It shows that I have decent verbal and quant skills.

I heard that it's not a good idea in the US for job applications or something cuz firms think people are just "using" them to get into Business School. That is not my plan. I just want to get experience, that's what internships are for.

I mean, I don't think a whole lot of people who are gonna be competing with me for these internships have done the GMAT. Wouldn't this help? Now I know it's not 700+ but what the hell.

It shows I took the time to study for this thing and study outside of school. I put tons of hours in this things. It also shows that I'm looking ahead. I plan on doing a masters in finance in a year's time and a good gmat score is required.

If so, where would you guys put it in the resume?

thanks

Leave it off.

Please don't quote Patrick Bateman.

5/30/10

Only 700+ should go on a resume.

"Those who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin

5/30/10

putting test scores on resume is always tricky.

for example, in your situation if you put a 680 on your resume you run the risk of people thinking, how come he/she didn't score higher? or what if the next resume that is looked at after yours, the candidate has a score of 750? maybe it doesn't end up being the make/break factor for getting through resume screening but why even run the risk?

i guess the only time where I might encourage someone to include a test score is if it was extremely high (e.g., GMAT 750+) or similar level on another well-known standardized exam.

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"It's very easy to have too many goals and be overwhelmed by them... The trick is to find the one thing you can focus on that represents every other single thing you want in life." -- @"Edmundo Braverman"

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"It's very easy to have too many goals and be overwhelmed by them... The trick is to find the one thing you can focus on that represents every other single thing you want in life." -- @"Edmundo Braverman"

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