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Repeating Excel stuffs..
Trying to make a pitch book more beautiful..
Few days without working late nights..
Getting pressures from either a boss or VPs..

I'm wondering how do the people in IBD manage such a lot of stress.
There of course, is several compensations including a strong will for promotion, relatively high salary, respect from other people, and (maybe) interest for his/her job..
But considering the lack of time, it seems that IBD people are impossible to do other things for their own lives. I don't think the compensations listed above can help bankers get rid of their stress completely. Is their other way that IBD bankers relieve their stress?
And besides, how can they live without a balance on their lives?
There is no time for other activities, they just have time for work and sleep(and a bit of time for their meals).

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Comments (42)

  • Stryfe's picture

    Through murders and executions mostly.

  • oliver13's picture

    Not to start a dick measuring competition, but banking stress is absolutely nothing compared to trading stress where you can literally lose millions of dollars on a slight goof up. Such level of careless, which costs traders millions of dollars goes through several iterations in investment banking. Unless you're an MD, there's very little you can do that can massively fuck up group.

  • NorthSider's picture

    You're either exaggerating or someone is trying to scare you by quoting an inflated number of hours that you work in IB. True, it's not a great balance as an analyst, but at ~70 hours in a normal week (which you can accomplish in most groups), you still have plenty of time to yourself to hang out with friends, go out on the town, etc. After your analyst stint, hours start taking a steady trajectory downwards whether you go into PE / HF or stay in banking.

    Sure, you'll have friends that work less than you do, but when you're not in the office, you have the resources to do pretty much anything you want.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • In reply to NorthSider
    BDN's picture

    NorthSider:

    You're either exaggerating or someone is trying to scare you by quoting an inflated number of hours that you work in IB. True, it's not a great balance as an analyst, but at ~70 hours in a normal week (which you can accomplish in most groups), you still have plenty of time to yourself to hang out with friends, go out on the town, etc. After your analyst stint, hours start taking a steady trajectory downwards whether you go into PE / HF or stay in banking.

    Sure, you'll have friends that work less than you do, but when you're not in the office, you have the resources to do pretty much anything you want.

    I was under the impression a normal week was 80-90 hours and busy weeks were easily over a 100, but obviously, you know more since you actually work in IB.

    How often would you say you have these 70 hour weeks?

  • In reply to NorthSider
    above_and_beyond's picture

    NorthSider:

    You're either exaggerating or someone is trying to scare you by quoting an inflated number of hours that you work in IB. True, it's not a great balance as an analyst, but at ~70 hours in a normal week (which you can accomplish in most groups), you still have plenty of time to yourself to hang out with friends, go out on the town, etc. After your analyst stint, hours start taking a steady trajectory downwards whether you go into PE / HF or stay in banking.

    Sure, you'll have friends that work less than you do, but when you're not in the office, you have the resources to do pretty much anything you want.

    70? That's just not true (though I wish it was).

  • In reply to above_and_beyond
    NorthSider's picture

    above_and_beyond:

    70? That's just not true (though I wish it was).

    Can't speak to Europe, but I can assure you that 70 hours is a fairly uniform average across most groups on the street, with the exception of a few well-known sweatshops.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • In reply to NorthSider
    DaisukiDaYo's picture

    NorthSider:

    above_and_beyond:

    70? That's just not true (though I wish it was).

    Can't speak to Europe, but I can assure you that 70 hours is a fairly uniform average across most groups on the street, with the exception of a few well-known sweatshops.

    People exaggerate all the time - however, I'd say the average is closer to 80 per week (incl weekends)

  • In reply to BDN
    NorthSider's picture

    BDN:

    I was under the impression a normal week was 80-90 hours and busy weeks were easily over a 100, but obviously, you know more since you actually work in IB.

    How often would you say you have these 70 hour weeks?

    Most people are. Mainly because banking analysts love to wear their hours as a badge of honor.

    I'd say that the plurality of weeks is between 65 and 70 hours, but the interspersion of a couple 80-110 hour weeks brings up the average.

    I'm speaking in generalities here, but for the average banking group on the street:

    Light work week (~15% of the time): 60 hours
    Average work week (~50% of the time): 70 hours
    Heavy work week (~25% of the time): 90 hours
    You're-getting-crushed week (~10% of the time): 100-110 hours

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • In reply to shibby
    NorthSider's picture

    shibby:

    This is absolutely not true for myself and the majority of first year analysts that I know in nyc. A little more accurate for second years.

    Are you going based on what they tell you or what you actually observe? Things are highly group-specific, but this is based on my knowledge of a fairly representative sample of BB and elite boutique analysts. To clarify, I'm talking about the average over the course of your 2-year stint.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • In reply to NorthSider
    Going Concern's picture

    NorthSider:

    BDN:

    I was under the impression a normal week was 80-90 hours and busy weeks were easily over a 100, but obviously, you know more since you actually work in IB.
    How often would you say you have these 70 hour weeks?

    Most people are. Mainly because banking analysts love to wear their hours as a badge of honor.

    I'd say that the plurality of weeks is between 65 and 70 hours, but the interspersion of a couple 80-110 hour weeks brings up the average.

    I'm speaking in generalities here, but for the average banking group on the street:

    Light work week (~15% of the time): 60 hours
    Average work week (~50% of the time): 70 hours
    Heavy work week (~25% of the time): 90 hours
    You're-getting-crushed week (~10% of the time): 100-110 hours

    So basically every third week you're doing 90+...ouch.

    “The new day brings new hope. The lives we’ve led, the lives we’ve yet to lead. A new day. New ideas. A new you.”

  • In reply to Going Concern
    NorthSider's picture

    Going Concern:

    NorthSider:

    BDN:
    I was under the impression a normal week was 80-90 hours and busy weeks were easily over a 100, but obviously, you know more since you actually work in IB.
    How often would you say you have these 70 hour weeks?

    Most people are. Mainly because banking analysts love to wear their hours as a badge of honor.
    I'd say that the plurality of weeks is between 65 and 70 hours, but the interspersion of a couple 80-110 hour weeks brings up the average.
    I'm speaking in generalities here, but for the average banking group on the street:
    Light work week (~15% of the time): 60 hours
    Average work week (~50% of the time): 70 hours
    Heavy work week (~25% of the time): 90 hours
    You're-getting-crushed week (~10% of the time): 100-110 hours

    So basically every third week you're doing 90+...ouch.

    I think it's much more reasonable to think about it this way: every 10th week you're doing 100 hours, every 4th week you're doing 90. Granted, it's just a different way of saying the same thing, but 90+ every third week implies that you'd be doing more than 90; however, I meant to say that you'd be doing exactly 90, give or take a few.

    And this is for the average banking group. There are certainly groups that pull fewer than this, and a few that pull more.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

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  • Derivs's picture

    I'm going to agree with North Sider. At work we have access to see who is currently logged in. After reading these forums, it would surprise you to see how few people are left around midnight sometimes. That being said, it does seem like the same few group/names are always logged in. And every group is going to have weeks where they just get crushed due to the nature of the capital markets.

    I will note that no matter how little or how much someone works, they will probably say that they work a ton just to fit in with the other analysts, or to reinforce an outsider's perception of IB's killer lifestyle. It's always funny to run across two analysts that both don't work as much as some of the more intense coverage groups. "How much do you work?" "Oh you know, typical hours" "Killer hours, huh!" "Yeah!!!" "Though sometimes I go home, you know, earlier..." "Oh yea, me too..." ::sigh of relief::

    I would be interested to meet people from my firm that worked as analysts during the crazy 2006/2007 years so I could compare. I bet those hours were consistently longer for sure.

  • In reply to Derivs
    NorthSider's picture

    Derivs:

    I'm going to agree with North Sider. At work we have access to see who is currently logged in. After reading these forums, it would surprise you to see how few people are left around midnight sometimes. That being said, it does seem like the same few group/names are always logged in. And every group is going to have weeks where they just get crushed due to the nature of the capital markets.

    I will note that no matter how little or how much someone works, they will probably say that they work a ton just to fit in with the other analysts, or to reinforce an outsider's perception of IB's killer lifestyle. It's always funny to run across two analysts that both don't work as much as some of the more intense coverage groups. "How much do you work?" "Oh you know, typical hours" "Killer hours, huh!" "Yeah!!!" "Though sometimes I go home, you know, earlier..." "Oh yea, me too..." ::sigh of relief::

    I would be interested to meet people from my firm that worked as analysts during the crazy 2006/2007 years so I could compare. I bet those hours were consistently longer for sure.

    For sure, hours c.2007 were much longer, but pay was also much higher. These days we're reverting to much more long-term averages with pay and hours. IB analysts always boast about their killer weeks, but they never talk about the average ones where they work 60 hours. That creates the false perception that the average week looks pretty similar to the killer week, which just isn't true.

    The other problem is that above, say, 50 hours, it becomes increasingly difficult to estimate how many hours you worked in a week. IB analysts hear numbers like 80-90 hours quoted all the time, so they just go with that when people ask them; but how often to you actually take a tally on how many hours you spend in the office? If I asked an IB analyst on the spot to tell me how many hours he/she worked this week, I guarantee it would be something in the 70-90 range, for no reason other than that's what seems standard. However, I wouldn't even put +/- 10% precision on that guess.

    For example, when I was an intern and we were paid hourly, the HR software would tally up the number of hours we worked. I'd get to the end of weeks where I was pretty sure that I worked longer than anyone else in the office (including FT analysts), so I expected to see tallies in the 100+ hour range. Many times, I was surprised to see things come in at around 90 hours during those weeks. There's no way that the FT analysts in that office were working any more than 80 during those weeks.

    And, let's be clear, 80 hours is a ton of time:

    Say you come in at 10 AM and leave at 10 PM all five days in a week. You'd have to book 20 hours over the weekend just to bring your tally to 80! And I can guarantee you that the average banking analyst is not pulling 20 hours over the average weekend.

    100 hours is more than 14 hours per day. So if you have any time whatsoever to do anything other than be in the office, you are not working 100 hours. If you watch TV at home ever, you are probably not working 100 hours. If you go to the bar with friends ever, you're probably not working 100 hours. So, if you've seen any of your IB friends this week, you can rest assured that they are not booking 100 hours.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • above_and_beyond's picture

    Damn, if those hours are true, I should gtfo out asap and lateral to one of the US offices. I generally get in at 9am and leave between 12pm-2am (MO-TH) and 9am to 10pm/11pm on FR. Moreover, the majority of analysts and a few associates in my group are in the office for at least one day on the weekend (typically 1pm - 7/8pm), usually even both days (analysts). I'm a first year though, but I can't see it improving that much in the second year.

    I would say that the typical work week is more like 80-85 hours, whereas 60 hours never happened to me or any other analyst in my group.

  • lionwater's picture

    70 hours!

    I almost never leave before midnight and average 95 hours a week with regular 100+ hour weeks.. but I am also at a well known sweat shop

  • In reply to lionwater
    NorthSider's picture

    lionwater:

    70 hours!

    I almost never leave before midnight and average 95 hours a week with regular 100+ hour weeks.. but I am also at a well known sweat shop

    The known sweat shops are a completely different story. But for the most part, you know what you're signing up for. Outside of those groups, banking hours are radically overstated.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • In reply to above_and_beyond
    NorthSider's picture

    above_and_beyond:

    Damn, if those hours are true, I should gtfo out asap and lateral to one of the US offices. I generally get in at 9am and leave between 12pm-2am (MO-TH) and 9am to 10pm/11pm on FR. Moreover, the majority of analysts and a few associates in my group are in the office for at least one day on the weekend (typically 1pm - 7/8pm), usually even both days (analysts). I'm a first year though, but I can't see it improving that much in the second year.

    I would say that the typical work week is more like 80-85 hours, whereas 60 hours never happened to me or any other analyst in my group.

    Definitely not the average in the U.S., from my sample of bankers across the non-sweatshop groups.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • LDNBNKR's picture

    70 - absolutely not the norm from what I have seen

  • In reply to Derivs
    CompBanker's picture

    Derivs:
    I would be interested to meet people from my firm that worked as analysts during the crazy 2006/2007 years so I could compare. I bet those hours were consistently longer for sure.

    I was an analyst from 2007 - 2009. 90+ hour averages were certainly the case before the full impact of the recession (January 2009 for me). There was literally too much work to go around that if anyone had any capacity, they would get staffed within 48 hours. Also, capacity at the time meant that you only had 1-2 live deals in slower phases of the process and maybe a pitch at the time.

    It is really hard for me to judge how bad the hours are for analysts these days since the amount of deals seems to have substantially decreased, but new staffing levels in theory reflect this. I will say that I rarely get emails past 11pm from the investment bankers that we engage to sell our companies. There were a number of instances recently where files were added to the dataroom between midnight and 3am, but those were few and far between. So in summary, you really can't look at 5-year old or even 2-year old data points to accurate access how hours are today, they change with the markets like everything else.

    CompBanker

  • GBB_19NHS's picture

    mostly the first year is what kills you. gets much better each year though. I guess 100 hour weeks are possible across all levels as are 70 hours (even at well known sweatshops).However, generally during the week there is virtually no time to do anything else than work.

    "too good to be true"

    See my WSO Blog

  • thewaterpiper's picture

    I tend to take it with a large pinch of salt when I hear analysts say they are pulling 100 hour weeks, every week (pretty sure I've seen some people on WSO claiming to have done that for two straight years). In reality, working 100 hour weeks mean you have absolutely no time to do anything else, and I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but analysts serially overestimate how much time they spend working.

    Interestingly, the slightly more senior guys at my firm say that working hours for juniors weren't really any worse pre-recession, and they think that work actually used to be less stressful. A big reason for this is that during the boom years, M&A deals tended to be a lot easier to execute (outlook was very positive, capital was easy to obtain, and hence, negotiations were a lot more straightforward)

  • leveredarb's picture

    lol @70 a week 50% of the time... maybe at UBS ;)

  • In reply to leveredarb
    NorthSider's picture

    leveredarb:

    lol @70 a week 50% of the time... maybe at UBS ;)

    At multiple coverage groups at BBs/boutiques.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • ametista's picture

    Guys, can we make some names of these BB groups and boutiques?

  • Asatar's picture

    I actually kept track of how much I was working (i.e. in the office, not travelling) during my internship. Average was about 75 hours at a top BB in London with maximum being 94, minimum being 72.

  • In reply to Asatar
    NorthSider's picture

    Asatar:

    I actually kept track of how much I was working (i.e. in the office, not travelling) during my internship. Average was about 75 hours at a top BB in London with maximum being 94, minimum being 72.

    Thanks for the sanity. From the outside, you always hear numbers like 100 hours quoted, but, in my experience, that usually just comes from bankers seriously underestimating how much work 100 hours is.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • GBB_19NHS's picture

    100 hours happen in the final phase of big deals with lean deal teams a lot but most of the year you will work sub 100 hours for sure. Asatar pretty much gives the accurate account (at least for London)

    "too good to be true"

    See my WSO Blog

  • In reply to NorthSider
    rufiolove's picture

    NorthSider:

    Derivs:

    I'm going to agree with North Sider. At work we have access to see who is currently logged in. After reading these forums, it would surprise you to see how few people are left around midnight sometimes. That being said, it does seem like the same few group/names are always logged in. And every group is going to have weeks where they just get crushed due to the nature of the capital markets.
    I will note that no matter how little or how much someone works, they will probably say that they work a ton just to fit in with the other analysts, or to reinforce an outsider's perception of IB's killer lifestyle. It's always funny to run across two analysts that both don't work as much as some of the more intense coverage groups. "How much do you work?" "Oh you know, typical hours" "Killer hours, huh!" "Yeah!!!" "Though sometimes I go home, you know, earlier..." "Oh yea, me too..." ::sigh of relief::
    I would be interested to meet people from my firm that worked as analysts during the crazy 2006/2007 years so I could compare. I bet those hours were consistently longer for sure.

    For sure, hours c.2007 were much longer, but pay was also much higher. These days we're reverting to much more long-term averages with pay and hours. IB analysts always boast about their killer weeks, but they never talk about the average ones where they work 60 hours. That creates the false perception that the average week looks pretty similar to the killer week, which just isn't true.

    The other problem is that above, say, 50 hours, it becomes increasingly difficult to estimate how many hours you worked in a week. IB analysts hear numbers like 80-90 hours quoted all the time, so they just go with that when people ask them; but how often to you actually take a tally on how many hours you spend in the office? If I asked an IB analyst on the spot to tell me how many hours he/she worked this week, I guarantee it would be something in the 70-90 range, for no reason other than that's what seems standard. However, I wouldn't even put +/- 10% precision on that guess.

    For example, when I was an intern and we were paid hourly, the HR software would tally up the number of hours we worked. I'd get to the end of weeks where I was pretty sure that I worked longer than anyone else in the office (including FT analysts), so I expected to see tallies in the 100+ hour range. Many times, I was surprised to see things come in at around 90 hours during those weeks. There's no way that the FT analysts in that office were working any more than 80 during those weeks.

    And, let's be clear, 80 hours is a ton of time:

    Say you come in at 10 AM and leave at 10 PM all five days in a week. You'd have to book 20 hours over the weekend just to bring your tally to 80! And I can guarantee you that the average banking analyst is not pulling 20 hours over the average weekend.

    100 hours is more than 14 hours per day. So if you have any time whatsoever to do anything other than be in the office, you are not working 100 hours. If you watch TV at home ever, you are probably not working 100 hours. If you go to the bar with friends ever, you're probably not working 100 hours. So, if you've seen any of your IB friends this week, you can rest assured that they are not booking 100 hours.


    I agree with a lot of this sentiment but not with the "if you have time to do anything, you aren't working 100 hours."

    The 9 - 2 am Monday through Thursday, 9 - 9 Friday, and 12 - 8 on Saturday & Sunday schedule was pretty common for me my first year and that still allowed me to go out twice in the week. It really just depends on how much sleep your body needs to function. I completely agree that the average is lower than is often reported, but there are some groups I know where kids are logging significantly more all the time and I still end up seeing them out boozing on the weekends...

  • In reply to NorthSider
    LifestyleBanker's picture

    NorthSider:

    Derivs:

    I'm going to agree with North Sider. At work we have access to see who is currently logged in. After reading these forums, it would surprise you to see how few people are left around midnight sometimes. That being said, it does seem like the same few group/names are always logged in. And every group is going to have weeks where they just get crushed due to the nature of the capital markets.
    I will note that no matter how little or how much someone works, they will probably say that they work a ton just to fit in with the other analysts, or to reinforce an outsider's perception of IB's killer lifestyle. It's always funny to run across two analysts that both don't work as much as some of the more intense coverage groups. "How much do you work?" "Oh you know, typical hours" "Killer hours, huh!" "Yeah!!!" "Though sometimes I go home, you know, earlier..." "Oh yea, me too..." ::sigh of relief::
    I would be interested to meet people from my firm that worked as analysts during the crazy 2006/2007 years so I could compare. I bet those hours were consistently longer for sure.

    For sure, hours c.2007 were much longer, but pay was also much higher. These days we're reverting to much more long-term averages with pay and hours. IB analysts always boast about their killer weeks, but they never talk about the average ones where they work 60 hours. That creates the false perception that the average week looks pretty similar to the killer week, which just isn't true.

    The other problem is that above, say, 50 hours, it becomes increasingly difficult to estimate how many hours you worked in a week. IB analysts hear numbers like 80-90 hours quoted all the time, so they just go with that when people ask them; but how often to you actually take a tally on how many hours you spend in the office? If I asked an IB analyst on the spot to tell me how many hours he/she worked this week, I guarantee it would be something in the 70-90 range, for no reason other than that's what seems standard. However, I wouldn't even put +/- 10% precision on that guess.

    For example, when I was an intern and we were paid hourly, the HR software would tally up the number of hours we worked. I'd get to the end of weeks where I was pretty sure that I worked longer than anyone else in the office (including FT analysts), so I expected to see tallies in the 100+ hour range. Many times, I was surprised to see things come in at around 90 hours during those weeks. There's no way that the FT analysts in that office were working any more than 80 during those weeks.

    And, let's be clear, 80 hours is a ton of time:

    Say you come in at 10 AM and leave at 10 PM all five days in a week. You'd have to book 20 hours over the weekend just to bring your tally to 80! And I can guarantee you that the average banking analyst is not pulling 20 hours over the average weekend.

    100 hours is more than 14 hours per day. So if you have any time whatsoever to do anything other than be in the office, you are not working 100 hours. If you watch TV at home ever, you are probably not working 100 hours. If you go to the bar with friends ever, you're probably not working 100 hours. So, if you've seen any of your IB friends this week, you can rest assured that they are not booking 100 hours.

    NS, what you're talking about may be true in the plurality of cases, but there are a larger number of sweatshops than people think. I have never booked less than a 100 hour week in banking. Most of my weeks are 110-120, with the occasional 130+. My worst week was 138. You can easily get into a group with these hours without knowing it beforehand.

    My average week is 9-2 M-thurs, 9-10 Fri, 10-12 S/S. I always knew this was a bit heavy, but it's not that uncommon.

  • In reply to LifestyleBanker
    Going Concern's picture

    LifestyleBanker:

    My average week is 9-2 M-thurs, 9-10 Fri, 10-12 S/S. I always knew this was a bit heavy, but it's not that uncommon.

    Wow. How do you keep yourself from checking into a loony bin? Or is that just the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow?

    “The new day brings new hope. The lives we’ve led, the lives we’ve yet to lead. A new day. New ideas. A new you.”

  • In reply to LifestyleBanker
    NorthSider's picture

    LifestyleBanker:

    I have never booked less than a 100 hour week in banking.

    Granted you know your hours better than I, but I have a hard time believing that. Even my friends who work in the Street's most notorious sweatshops book occasional weeks less than 100 hours.

    My average week is 9-2 M-thurs, 9-10 Fri, 10-12 S/S. I always knew this was a bit heavy, but it's not that uncommon.

    I can assure you, that's pretty uncommon. Outside of my friends at the known sweatshops, I don't know anyone who consistently pulls these kind of hours.

    Most of my weeks are 110-120, with the occasional 130+. My worst week was 138.

    As long as we are being anecdotal, I have never booked a week longer than 110 hours since I started full time in banking (did as an intern).

    You can easily get into a group with these hours without knowing it beforehand.

    I don't know how this is possible, unless you just haven't met the people you're working with before hand. Considering most people intern in the group that they go into FT, you should be keenly aware of the kind of hours you're getting yourself into before you start. Anyone with the facility to use the search function on WSO can easily identify the known sweatshops on the street.

    More importantly, constant 100+ hour weeks (with "most" being 110-120, by your tally) take a toll on a person's appearance and demeanor. I interviewed at a couple sweatshop groups, and it's impossible to ignore the deep-seated bags under analyst eyes, the zombie-like functionality and incessant coffee-sipping. I have my doubts that someone could just wake up one day and find themselves in an IB sweatshop.

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • NorthSider's picture

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  • warberg's picture
  • CarriedDisinterest's picture

    Feeling Good, Living Better

  • Fetter's picture
  • NorthSider's picture

    "For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

  • ekimlacks's picture

    I think that we are all clinging to a great many piano tops...