2/21/11

So I already signed with a firm in New York back a couple months ago

However the other night, I was pulled over for "reckless driving" where I was speeding enough for it to count as more than a mere speeding ticket, in California which is a misdemeanor.

Assuming that I go through the legal system and I end up with the misdemeanor charge on my record and the firm conducts a background check (which they will or have already), will this cause my offer to be revoked?

Or perhaps I will start working for a couple months then will they tell me not to come back?

I'm reaching out those that have perhaps hired individuals with misdemeanors etc.

Any insight would be helpful, I'm freaking out that I will be out of a job and perhaps even not be able to find a new one...

Comments (23)

2/21/11

You should be ok. Just be up front with HR and anytime you have to fill out paperwork. Obviously try to get it dismissed (will require a lawyer and maybe classes) if possible so that you can answer "NO" if it asks about only convictions. Generally they are most concerned about theft, embezzlement, etc. but take care of the legal process ASAP.

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2/21/11

Well best case scenario would be to be acquitted for a lesser charge.

In the scenario that I am actually convicted of the misdemeanor, the best course of action would be to notify HR?

2/21/11

Did you apply for a delivery boy position? I had a ton of tickets and a BB where I worked at and they did not care. You are ok!

"The higher up the mountain, the more treacherous the path"
-Frank Underwood

2/21/11

Regular traffic tickets are okay since they're not too serious. But in my case it was higher speed than a regular traffic ticket hence the misdemeanor.

Misdemeanors like cheese said can encompass theft/embezzlement/possession of drugs etc..I was wondering since I already got the offer and signed, if I get convicted for the misdemeanor will it affect my offer to the point where they will revoke my offer?

All the resources I could find online was only DUIs but I imagine reckless driving is not as bad as a DUI as it is speeding.

Any additional insight from somebody in my position or knows anybody would be welcomed.

2/21/11

I have friends with misdemeanors that have done summer internships in IB, Big 4, and other areas of financial services with no problems.

The key is to just be up front about it. Financial firms don't usually care unless the charge is related to fraud, embezzlement, etc. There should be no problems as long as they don't think that you are trying to hide it.

My friend had her offer revoked, but it was only because she allowed HR to discover the misdemeanor on the background check instead of informing them beforehand.

2/21/11

I think you could get away with it... it's only a speeding ticket. Just follow the advice on this thread and you should be fine. Good luck!

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2/21/11

Your fine dude, chill the hell out. Just make sure you fill out the application properly thats all. I have 3 reckless tickets and I told my co. about it upfront, they said it did show up on the background but they were glad I mentioned it upfront or it may have looked bad/worse.

No bank is going to rescind an offer, not hire you, or fire you bc of a reckless driving ticket, end of story. The only thing that can go wrong is if you somehow fill out the app wrong and leave it off if you were supposed to disclose it.

We've got half a million shares in the bag!

2/21/11

With a lawyer you can probably get the misdemeanor charge dropped and save yourself this headache. Without a lawyer you could probably still get the charge dropped if you know how to sound intelligent and informed.

"You stop being an asshole when it sucks to be you." -IlliniProgrammer
"Your grammar made me wish I'd been aborted." -happypantsmcgee

2/21/11

misdemeanor is in the same class as DUIs. more seriuos than tickets.

one of my SA class was going 120, got thrown in jail for a night, and he's still doing fine in the industry. no worries for you.

next time slow the fuck down.

2/21/11

Get a lawyer ASAP to plead it down/dismiss. Having said that, if banks cared too much about speeding a lot of people would be in trouble - but you generally don't want any sort of record

2/21/11

how fast were you going?

It's what you put into it

2/21/11

More importantly what were you driving?

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

3/2/14

happypantsmcgee:

More importantly what were you driving?

Even more important, did you have a hot blonde in your lap?

2/21/11

Do what you can to get it pleaded down to a lesser charge. I had a similar situation in high school and was advised by my lawyer that most DUIs (in states where it is legal to do so) are pleaded down to a "reckless driving" so it's important to get yours pleaded down further and not be lumped in with the convicted drunk drivers of the world..

2/21/11
onemanwolfpack:

Do what you can to get it pleaded down to a lesser charge. I had a similar situation in high school and was advised by my lawyer that most DUIs (in states where it is legal to do so) are pleaded down to a "reckless driving" so it's important to get yours pleaded down further and not be lumped in with the convicted drunk drivers of the world..

While you are correct about the reckless, you are contradicting yourself. You say DUI's get pleaded down to reckless...so dont get lumped in with "convicted drunk drivers"....well if they were convicted they would have a DUI not a reckless.

We've got half a million shares in the bag!

3/2/14

Traffics okay

3/2/14

.

3/2/14

I think usually on job applications they'll ask you to disclose any convictions "other than minor traffic violations" or some similar wording. Just be upfront about it is all you can really do.

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

3/2/14

trust me when i say this, don't sweat it and forget about it. this is nothing. not even nothing

3/2/14

It's a summary offense. If they want to hire you, they may not care. If they don't, if they don't use this as a reason, they'll find something else.

In different states the law will vary. For instance, in Australia, crimes with no conviction recorded only show up (to the best of my knowledge), on applications to work for children, work in government, court systems (ie. to get admitted to practice law), and when you apply to practice medicine.

One of the easiest ways to find out is head down to your local police station and try to order a police report for yourself (costs about $45). You'll find out what's on it.

And find out a way that proves you learnt something from it, and spin it into a life lesson. Otherwise when they find out, they may wonder how they could trust you in the future, with any high risk responsibilities.

2/21/11
3/2/14

mk

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