• Sharebar

Hi monkeys!

I just discovered the Khan Academy website and it looks a great resource.

I have my GRE in a month. I am aiming to get into business school next fall. I'm doing alright with studying but still bad on math.

Is Khan Academy a good resource to study from for the GRE? I always hear the GRE is pretty easy but I'm a girl who was always bad at math.

Help please :)

Comments (34)

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Do you have a book? How are you doing on the GRE practice tests for the quant section?

    Also do not disregard AWA and Verbal. Us quanty MFE applicants can get away with lower scores there, but you should aim for a 720 V / 5.0 AWA.

    Kaplan comes highly recommended, but there are plenty of good programs out there.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    SpanishBuzz's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Do you have a book? How are you doing on the GRE practice tests for the quant section?

    Also do not disregard AWA and Verbal. Us quanty MFE applicants can get away with lower scores there, but you should aim for a 720 V / 5.0 AWA.

    Kaplan comes highly recommended, but there are plenty of good programs out there.

    Yep. I have the Barrons 18th Edition, the Kaplan GRE 2011 Edition and the Nova GRE Math Bible. In practice tests, I am getting around 600 in Quantitative. I know I can do better and I have to.

    Definitely not disregarding Verbal. Have made a list of key words which I study from. I feel, me being a native speaker, it should come easier (I hope!) :)

    I am concerned about the quantitative. Any tips on how to do better? I think my biggest problem is applying the algebra to questions. Is it a question of simply practice, practice, practice? Or do you have any tricks?

    Thank you!

  • ....'s picture

    Sal Khan is an HBS grad and hedge-fund alum - the man knows what he's talking about. That said, different people learn in different ways and Khan Academy isn't that interactive yet. It's great for some people, not so great for others. Depends on who you are.

  • bfin's picture

    ^^dude is a straight up genius "Khan holds three degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology: a BS in mathematics, a BS in electrical engineering and computer science, and an MS in electrical engineering and computer science. He also holds an MBA from Harvard Business School." - Wikipedia.

    The answer to your question is 1) network 2) get involved 3) beef up your resume 4) repeat -happypantsmcgee

    WSO is not your personal search function.

  • SDBall22's picture

    I'll sell you my Veritas Prep study guides (for the GMAT) for a discount if you want. I went cover-to-cover in about 7-8 weeks and they bumped my score by roughly 50 to 60 points. They are mint with no writing or notes on the pages.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Kaplan bumped my SATs by 300 points. It's the established program, they've been doing it for decades and decades; it is money well spent.

    Also don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but Khan's grad school degree is an MS, not an MPhil. In other words, he was rejected from a funded program and was accepted at a non-funded fairly-easy-to-get-into engineering master's- the graduate equivalent of Harvard Extension School. It means the guy did as well on the GREs as most test prep instructors- and he is good at marketing his business- but hardly a genius.

    Go with an established program like Kaplan or The Princeton Review; you get more bang for your buck, more test prep materials, and a much better researched and proven system. It will minimize your risk of not getting an 800 on the Quant Section.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    SpanishBuzz's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Kaplan bumped my SATs by 300 points. It's the established program, they've been doing it for decades and decades; it is money well spent.

    Also don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but Khan's grad school degree is an MS, not an MPhil. In other words, he was rejected from a funded program and was accepted at a non-funded fairly-easy-to-get-into engineering master's- the graduate equivalent of Harvard Extension School. It means the guy did as well on the GREs as most test prep instructors- and he is good at marketing his business- but hardly a genius.

    Go with an established program like Kaplan or The Princeton Review; you get more bang for your buck, more test prep materials, and a much better researched and proven system. It will minimize your risk of not getting an 800 on the Quant Section.

    Just took a practice test and my score was 480Q! Desperate for some help. I dont know why it wont come to me. The tricks I learn, I forget.

    Is Barrons the best book to study from?

    Any suggestions that people found successful, even for the GMAT would be great to know!!!!!!!!!!!

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    SpencerMakesBank's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Kaplan bumped my SATs by 300 points. It's the established program, they've been doing it for decades and decades; it is money well spent.

    Also don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but Khan's grad school degree is an MS, not an MPhil. In other words, he was rejected from a funded program and was accepted at a non-funded fairly-easy-to-get-into engineering master's- the graduate equivalent of Harvard Extension School. It means the guy did as well on the GREs as most test prep instructors- and he is good at marketing his business- but hardly a genius.

    Go with an established program like Kaplan or The Princeton Review; you get more bang for your buck, more test prep materials, and a much better researched and proven system. It will minimize your risk of not getting an 800 on the Quant Section.

    But it says it is from MIT?

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    What if my GED is from the Harvard Extension School? Is that like better than Exeter or something?

    Not comparing Khan's MS- a legitimate masters- to a GED- just pointing out that most engineering schools are not very selective in their non-funded terminating MS admissions.

  • SDBall22's picture

    ^^Have you gone on GMAT club and surfed around yet? Illini made some solid recos above. I'll repeat that I used the Veritas Prep materials and it helped me a lot. There are definitely tricks and shortcuts but bottomline is that it sounds like you need to do some serious studying. And this website can't study for you. Start doing dozens (if not hundreds) of problems every single day. You are probably going to have to spend some money on study materials.

  • In reply to SDBall22
    SpanishBuzz's picture

    SDBall22 wrote:
    ^^Have you gone on GMAT club and surfed around yet? Illini made some solid recos above. I'll repeat that I used the Veritas Prep materials and it helped me a lot. There are definitely tricks and shortcuts but bottomline is that it sounds like you need to do some serious studying. And this website can't study for you. Start doing dozens (if not hundreds) of problems every single day. You are probably going to have to spend some money on study materials.

    Thanks :)

    I have study material, made quant cards, verbal cards etc. Got the Barrons book which I heard is the best. I think I am good but then get a little worried when I make some mistakes.

    Isnt Veritas largely for the GMAT? As is the GMAT club, they dont have much info for the the GRE?!?!?

  • SDBall22's picture

    Yes Veritas is for the GMAT. And so is GMAT club, I suppose. So, you are going to take the GRE because you think the math is easier on that test? I've heard that this might be the case but my vote would still be take the GMAT if you want to go to bschool.

  • In reply to SDBall22
    SpanishBuzz's picture

    SDBall22 wrote:
    Yes Veritas is for the GMAT. And so is GMAT club, I suppose. So, you are going to take the GRE because you think the math is easier on that test? I've heard that this might be the case but my vote would still be take the GMAT if you want to go to bschool.

    No as it keeps my options open in terms of dual degrees. And seeing as so many b schools take the GRE, its cost effective and common sense too.

  • baddebt88's picture

    Khan Academy is a free program with online tutorials, not a business. It runs off of grants by a number of wealthy donors (Gates/Doerr of VC fame) and institutions. Its an awesome resource: I have used it to brush up on some math concepts and my sister has used it for SAT help.

    However, it isn't meant to be a complete test prep substitute. For that you either need a self-study system or you need to go to a test prep company. If you are in NYC you might be better off going to one of the local cram schools that are run by Asians. In high school, I had sat through some Kaplan courses and completed a cram session for SAT at a Korean test prep school: the Korean test prep school BLEW Kaplan away. There is a reason that demographics absolutely destroys standardized tests.

    Check out Elite Academy. Its located in Flushing and I would highly recommend it for test prep purposes.

    Also anyone pooh pooing Khan for having a MS not a MPhil is being ridiculous. A lot of times people end up in 4 year BS/MS programs or take the M.S. as they are not looking into continuing in academia and just want to pursue their academic interests one more year before entering professional life. For a lot of people (including a number of my friends at a top-10 who could easily go to a funded program), packing and moving for a year didn't make any sense for them. Their financial aid also covered a big part of the costs. Khan has academic creds and is being lauded by Bill Gates and John Doerr for providing free instruction which supplements the abysmal teaching at some of our public schools. Lets not try to knock him down for "just" getting a M.S. from MIT. Jesus.

  • In reply to baddebt88
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    baddebt88 wrote:
    Also anyone pooh pooing Khan for having a MS not a MPhil is being ridiculous. A lot of times people end up in 4 year BS/MS programs or take the M.S. as they are not looking into continuing in academia and just want to pursue their academic interests one more year before entering professional life.

    That's fine. An MIT Engineering MS is nothing to sneeze at but nothing to go gaga over either. A combined BS/MS Engineering program is fairly easy to get into at a top five engineering school like MIT- certainly easier than undergrad, certainly easier than a funded PhD program at Virginia Tech. A separate MS grad program is even easier. If you want funding, though, you apply for a PhD and get your MPhil.

    Quote:
    For a lot of people (including a number of my friends at a top-10 who could easily go to a funded program), packing and moving for a year didn't make any sense for them. Their financial aid also covered a big part of the costs. Khan has academic creds and is being lauded by Bill Gates and John Doerr for providing free instruction which supplements the abysmal teaching at some of our public schools. Lets not try to knock him down for "just" getting a M.S. from MIT. Jesus.

    I'm not knocking him down. I was simply responding to this comment:

    Quote:
    dude is a straight up genius

    Just saying it helps to understand the letters after folks names and to take them with a grain of salt. Khan is smarter than many people out there, but there are probably many folks who are as smart as he is and perhaps some who are smarter than him. Letters after your name do not necessarily mean that you are a "straight up genius"- it just means- at least if those letters are in engineering- that you are fairly quantitative and fairly smart. It's also always wise to start getting skeptical when folks start using unqualified hyperbole. That's all.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    FinancialNoviceII's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    baddebt88 wrote:
    Also anyone pooh pooing Khan for having a MS not a MPhil is being ridiculous. A lot of times people end up in 4 year BS/MS programs or take the M.S. as they are not looking into continuing in academia and just want to pursue their academic interests one more year before entering professional life.

    That's fine. An MS is nothing to sneeze at but nothing to go gaga over either. A combined BS/MS Engineering program is fairly easy to get into at a top five engineering school like MIT- certainly easier than undergrad. A separate MS grad program is even easier. If you want funding, though, you apply for a PhD and get your MPhil.

    Quote:
    For a lot of people (including a number of my friends at a top-10 who could easily go to a funded program), packing and moving for a year didn't make any sense for them. Their financial aid also covered a big part of the costs. Khan has academic creds and is being lauded by Bill Gates and John Doerr for providing free instruction which supplements the abysmal teaching at some of our public schools. Lets not try to knock him down for "just" getting a M.S. from MIT. Jesus.

    I'm not knocking him down. Just saying it helps to understand the letters after folks names and to take them with a grain of salt. Khan is smarter than many people out there, but there are probably some folks who are smarter than him. That's all.

    Does it really matter whether his degree from MIT is a lesser one or if there are smarter people out there? I dont think Salman Khan is claiming any accolades as the smartest or the one with the most degrees etc. Lets laud him for his initiative in setting up an invaluable resource, that frankly I would have killed to have when I was in high school.

    I think its a bit disrespectful disparaging someone's academic success and labelling it easy to achieve or get into. Besides the bottom of the barrel schools, entry to most programmes is fairly competitive. I dont challenge your knowledge Illini, I just think its a pointless debate when OP wanted some advice on GRE tips.

  • In reply to FinancialNoviceII
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    FinancialNoviceII wrote:
    Does it really matter whether his degree from MIT is a lesser one or if there are smarter people out there? I dont think Salman Khan is claiming any accolades as the smartest or the one with the most degrees etc. Lets laud him for his initiative in setting up an invaluable resource, that frankly I would have killed to have when I was in high school.

    No it doesn't matter. That's the whole point. The question is what helps improve scores and what's proven. An MIT MS does not make someone a "genius" let alone serve any basis for deciding whether they provide a quality GRE test prep. They may very well be a genius- they may very well run a great test prep program, but degrees and certifications have little bearing on whether or not you are a "genius" or your ability to run a test prep program. (Though some Entrepreneurship MBAs may argue differently :-) .)

    Quote:
    I think its a bit disrespectful disparaging someone's academic success and labelling it easy to achieve or get into. Besides the bottom of the barrel schools, entry to most programmes is fairly competitive. I dont challenge your knowledge Illini, I just think its a pointless debate when OP wanted some advice on GRE tips.

    Sure. Never meant to disparage someone's degree- just trying to debunk certain (problematic) assumptions in blackfinancier's post. Genius is also almost always strong language short of describing a Nobel laureate.

    Kaplan and Princeton review cost $1K, but they have a proven system that they've been using for decades and decades. Most importantly, they both have had a large subset of customers who *need* to get an 800 on the Quant section of the exam for a long time, and have a good track record of making sure that folks who are capable of getting those scores are able to achieve that when they take the exam.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    bfin's picture

    The answer to your question is 1) network 2) get involved 3) beef up your resume 4) repeat -happypantsmcgee

    WSO is not your personal search function.