3/3/13

I found an interesting boutique where I'd like to know more about their job opportunities etc. and found a former alumnus from my school who works there now. I was wondering is it better to send the person a message through InMail or should I email?

The person's nor anyone's email is not displayed on their website, only a generic email for sending applications but naturally I'd rather go personal and contact this person. Which is better? Some people say sending a normal email by adjusting it to the email structure is fine, but then some people fear this is sort of stalkerish? And regarding InMails people say they are not as effective as people do not bother so much with messages or checking their LinkedIn profiles?

Comments (54)

3/3/13

email > linkedin mail.

not everyone checks their linkedin or has it set up to an email account which they check. email more formal and professional too.

"After you work on Wall Street it's a choice, would you rather work at McDonalds or on the sell-side? I would choose McDonalds over the sell-side." - David Tepper

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3/3/13

Oreos:
email > linkedin mail.

THIS.

Listen to Oreos' advice, not the other guy who posted.

3/3/13

Try the InMail first. If you don't get a response within 7 days, the InMail bounces back due to lack of response. Try a formal email afterwards.

3/3/13

SlikRick:
Try the InMail first. If you don't get a response within 7 days, the InMail bounces back due to lack of response. Try a formal email afterwards.

okay, lets run with this:
scenario 1) he doesn't see the linked mail, but gets the email a week later than would have otherwise
scenario 2) he sees the linkedin, ignores. gets an email a week later, from a name he vaguely recognises "following up" on what....oh, Linkined is mentioned in his email, checks linkedin, oh that guy, ignore again. but now he's pissed you wasted more of his time. would have had same outcome from straight email
scenario 3) he sees the linkedin, too busy. gets an email a week later, from same guy, thinks "jeez, this kid is chasing me everywhere! why didn't he just follow up on Linkedin?"
scenario 4) he sees the linkedin, too busy. gets an email a week later, from a name he vaguely recognises, apologises, gets in touch. would have had same outcome with email straight off the bat (he responded to the 2nd email, so he isn't averse to email)

obviously ignoring the "he would never get in touch" scenario and various other options. but you see my point...

"After you work on Wall Street it's a choice, would you rather work at McDonalds or on the sell-side? I would choose McDonalds over the sell-side." - David Tepper

3/3/13

i actually want some oreos now.

If the glove don't fit, you must acquit!

3/3/13

Definitely email. Different people utilize LinkedIn many different ways. In my experience, the more senior the person, the less time they spend on the site and developing their connections.

Please don't quote Patrick Bateman.

3/3/13

Should not be a problem coming off stalkerish? Basically do not even mention where you got their contact details, instead just start of the cold email with "I noticed that you are a former alumnus of my school etc.." ?

3/3/13

Email. LinkedIn isn't the best way to communicate with people. It's a much better way to find out who to network with.

3/3/13

A little foreplay never hurt anyone before getting down to business.

3/3/13

No.

From my experience, I've gotten farther with people when I don't include my resume. Personally, I have the (slightly understandable) fear of some MD passing me up because he doesn't realize I have great experience/grades/whatever. However, they always ask for your resume when the time comes. It seems much less forceful IMO. In fact, I've had a much higher response rate for emails without my resume attached.

Your LinkedIn profile is essentially your resume "in 3d". Same thing goes for that. Chances are if they're active on LinkedIn, they'll look you up anyway.

This could be it, sweetheart.

3/3/13

Not so sure. I've done both methods. Achieved a slightly higher response with the resume attached than w/o. I'm guessing it's because whoever I'm emailing, whether it be an analyst or associate to a director or partner, would like to skim over my background a little bit just for some context to determine whether or not I'm worth talking to.

I guess at the same time, however, it could be because I'm at a non-target. The average kid at my school isn't cut out for high finance jobs, so adding in the resume in a way shows that I'm up for the task.

3/3/13

It's funny you say that, because so am I.

Guess it could go either way. Since I often come out too strong I avoid an early ding by not including my resume.

This could be it, sweetheart.

3/3/13

I would not add my resume. It screams "give me a job" in the first email. You don't want to do that.
I would just include a url to my linkedin (vanity url, of course) in the signature so the reader can know more about me than what I presumably would have written in the body of the e-mail. At this point you just want to say "I am interested in learning about your work"

3/3/13

I attached my resume whenever I email someone that I want to connect to professionally. I've actually heard both ways (to attach and not to attach)... it's preferential.

I usually send a collegial though polite email, and just attach it. I think it can serve as a "this kid isn't wasting my time" check.

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3/3/13

That guy sounds like a dick.

I've sent some cold e-mails through linked in when I wasn't able to find their company e-mail on their website. Honestly I don't look at cold e-mailing over LinkedIn any different than cold e-mailing their company e-mail. One of my most promising informational interviews came from a message I sent through LinkedIn.

That guy is probably just a dick. What exactly did he say?

3/3/13

It's worked very well for me in the past. I don't know if I would bother trying to network (outside of formal means) with this firm - seems like they don't appreciate cold emails. Maybe he had a bad day/is a dick, but you don't want to jeopardize your chance.

3/3/13

i used it before and it worked! i emailed an MD though not a junior person who is probably afraid of incoming competition ;) i would say email decision makers, VPs or MDs and dont worry with juniors! good luck.

3/3/13

out and about:
i used it before and it worked! i emailed an MD though not a junior person who is probably afraid of incoming competition ;) i would say email decision makers, VPs or MDs and dont worry with juniors! good luck.

oftentimes the junior guys can get you an interview so don't listen to this advice...you should be e-mailing junior and senior guys (not all at once all at the same firm)

3/3/13

When I first graduated and was looking for a job I would do the exact same thing. Find a position I was interested in, then use Linked-In to find people in that department and in the region where the job was listed. I mixed it up with the people I messaged, I would message maybe two junior guys, one mid-level guy, and if I could find him the VP of the dept. I'd say I got messages back about 10% of the time but they were always positive and helpful. The one VP even started with, "keep doing what your doing because this shows some initiative."

I'd keep at it.

Give me a kid whose smart, poor, and hungry...............

3/3/13

That does sound like a harsh response, just shrug it off and keep networking.

3/3/13

I agree with the above posts. I've had some success cold emailing via Linkedin. keep at it and good luck!

3/3/13

E-mail him. It shows your tenacity if anything (done it quite a bit).

Shooter

3/3/13

Can you send me a LinedIn Inmail too? Just message him from LinkedIn again and if he doesn't respond, move on.

3/3/13

Regarding that "awkward" question, I feel like if you can't find out someone's email address in less than 3 minutes, there's no hope for you.

3/3/13

I could either inMail him or email him (I have enough inMail credits if that's the question).

The last time it took him 3 week to respond to the inMail so I'm thinking he doesn't check it all that often.

True, it's easy to find an email address (for high-ranking peeps) but does it cross a line into creepiness if I've already messaged him via Linkedin?

3/3/13

e-mail him and don't turn back.

Shooter

3/3/13

email. If you're worried about the potential awkwardness just say you found his email when you googled him, maybe he will be flattered.

3/3/13

Email. Casually mention it- will show your conviction

I'm on the pursuit of happiness and I know everything that shine ain't always gonna be gold. I'll be fine once I get it

3/3/13

Is this a real question?

I'd like to know which one of these, in your very strange mind, is 'creepier': stalking somebody through linkedin and messaging them, or logically deducing someone's email based on their name and company.

Email him, and don't for a second think he will ponder on the 'significance' of you emailing him vs messaging him on LNKD.
As an addendum, if he gives his phone # for a phone chat, you do NOT have to play it cool with the 3 day rule ;)

3/3/13

I think Email is the best option ,linkedin is also good but when it comes to constant reply and results then Emailing is still a best option.Apart from making professional contacts.

3/3/13

do both buddy

3/3/13

Just do both. You have nothing to lose and most guys appreciate a little pro activeness.

3/3/13

bump

3/3/13

Banks are in the process of securing interns right now. You had best get stared as soon as possible

3/3/13

I would like to know this too, as I have recently reached out to 20 different boutique investment banks in the Chicagoland interview and don't want to botch a possible connection by moving too fast.

3/3/13

.

3/3/13

It worked for me this summer.

I basically e-mailed every boutique in the regional boutique thread in my region with a short message similar to yours. Just keep at it, it took me a long time to actually get an interview - but all you need is one.

3/3/13

Hey boudinot, did you include your resume on the first email or did you email with an inquiry first and then followed up to their response with a resume?

3/3/13

Yes, be direct. I pretty much mass emailed a whole bunch of boutiques what you just wrote. Most did not reply, but around 20% of people did. And around 5% actually had openings, so you will have to email a lot of banks.

I did not include a resume, but I did briefly detail my experience in 1 sentence.

3/3/13

Its corporate so prob not. If its valuation and research you want, hit up smaller appraisal shops. Integra comes to mind.. they are a big company too, but the offices are small and the guys who run them are usually old men who may be open to hiring an unpaid intern for the summer. Call them, then follow up with email.

3/3/13

Why the Hell not, it worked for me.

Just make sure you follow up with the call, and good luck in charming his/her assistant/secretary who will be manning/screening his calls.

Once you're past that initial barrier, and you get through, it'll be plain sailing.

Get to the point, be concise and sound serious - tell them what experience you have (if any) and tell them which/where you'll be wanting to seek experience from. Good luck!

3/3/13

I got my current internship at a small appraisal/brokerage company through a cold-email.

3/3/13

At a large company like CBRE, etc you basically have to know someone. I cold called (much better than emailing) and cold emailed about a 100 firms and the end of the day had about 10 to choose from. Buy those who gave an interview were all smaller firms. Alumni connections or family relations are your best bet for a JLL/CBRE etc.

3/3/13

OGWestCoast:

At a large company like CBRE, etc you basically have to know someone. I cold called (much better than emailing) and cold emailed about a 100 firms and the end of the day had about 10 to choose from. Buy those who gave an interview were all smaller firms. Alumni connections or family relations are your best bet for a JLL/CBRE etc.

You're totally right about that one. Most of the associates at my shop this year have family who are in financing, development/acquisitions, brokerage, etc. I work at a big national firm in one of the more flagship offices. Got my job by cold calling the #1 broker for a product type I wanted to work. Hired me on the spot after I finally got him to meet me. Please note that we had been going back and forth over the phone for about a month. That's how you get business in brokerage anyhow.

My advice to marc2: "Pick up the phone and start dialing. . . "

I had a flair for languages. But I soon discovered that what talks best is dollars, dinars, drachmas, rubles, rupees and pounds fucking sterling.

3/3/13

I had a flair for languages. But I soon discovered that what talks best is dollars, dinars, drachmas, rubles, rupees and pounds fucking sterling.

3/3/13
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