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I haven't seen this thread yet, so i figure it's time to get the ball rolling since round 1 deadlines are coming up.

If you can, post which rounds you're applying to, and rank the schools in order of preference. If you want to add more details, such as career goals, numbers, etc., feel free to do that as well. I will start first.

Round 2

Wharton
Sloan
Booth
Columbia
Tuck
Stern

Career goals: still debating on whether i should go into a specialized area of finance or try for MBB consulting, with a nonprofit focus. I realize they are very different fields, so i need to make up mind relatively soon on what story i want to tell b-schools.

Comments (64)

  • holla_back's picture

    Round 2 (in relative order of preference):

    HBS
    Tuck
    Columbia
    Kellogg or Booth
    YSOM
    Stern
    Texas

  • In reply to holla_back
    TheLastCall's picture

    holla_back wrote:
    Round 2 (in relative order of preference):

    HBS
    Tuck
    Columbia
    Kellogg or Booth
    YSOM
    Stern
    Texas

    Tuck ahead of columbia/booth/kellogg? That's pretty unusual. And yale over stern? Hmm.

  • mba2015's picture
  • cphbravo96's picture

    Round 2 applicant here.

    Darden
    Fuqua
    Kenan-Flagler

    I'm trying to decide on some others with Vanderbilt and Emory being possibilities. Depending on where my GMAT comes out, I might put in an application to HBS.

    Career aspirations? I would like to get into a general MM PE shop, but realize that might be tough given my background, etc. I will definitely recruit for MM and boutique IBs like Harris Williams, BlackArch Partners, etc. and hope to make a transition to a reputable PEG after a couple of years as an IB associate, assuming I decide I don't want to stay where I'm at.

    Anyone else looking at similar schools, similar paths, etc.?

    Regards

    "The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
    - Ronald Reagan

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    holla_back's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:
    holla_back wrote:
    Round 2 (in relative order of preference):

    HBS
    Tuck
    Columbia
    Kellogg or Booth
    YSOM
    Stern
    Texas

    Tuck ahead of columbia/booth/kellogg? That's pretty unusual. And yale over stern? Hmm.

    Yeah, I've always had a real hard-on for Tuck. Tuck provides just as much opportunity as any other non-HSW school, the alumni's love for their school is seemingly unrivaled, and I'd love to live up in the woods for two years.

    And why not Yale over Stern? I'd argue that Yale and Stern are definitely in the same tier, and it's be nice to get out of NYC for a couple years. I would also seriously consider Yale over Kellogg.

  • In reply to holla_back
    TheLastCall's picture

    holla_back wrote:
    TheLastCall wrote:
    holla_back wrote:
    Round 2 (in relative order of preference):

    HBS
    Tuck
    Columbia
    Kellogg or Booth
    YSOM
    Stern
    Texas

    Tuck ahead of columbia/booth/kellogg? That's pretty unusual. And yale over stern? Hmm.

    Yeah, I've always had a real hard-on for Tuck. Tuck provides just as much opportunity as any other non-HSW school, the alumni's love for their school is seemingly unrivaled, and I'd love to live up in the woods for two years.

    And why not Yale over Stern? I'd argue that Yale and Stern are definitely in the same tier, and it's be nice to get out of NYC for a couple years. I would also seriously consider Yale over Kellogg.

    Tuck does have probably the most loyal alumni network among any b-school. It does however have 2 disadvantages. First, its remote location makes it harder for students to network with firms. Second, its small alumni network is also a liability. They do well in consulting and banking and to a lesser extent some of the investment management firms in boston.

    Yale is IMO not a great school, and I don't get the hype. Maybe I'm missing something here. Yes, Dean Snyder is a great dean, and the new building opening up in december 2013 looks great. But Yale SOM is a fairly young program; consequently, its alumni network is very weak, and it just doesn't get respect from major recruiters. Will this change in the next 5-10 years? Perhaps, but you're not paying $150K to attend a school that might pay off in the long-term if SOM rapidly moves up in the rankings. You want to spend the money for a school that is currently respected and can get you opportunities coming out. Yale over Stern for finance makes no sense to me, and Yale over Kellogg for anything, is ridiculous.

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    holla_back's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:

    Tuck does have probably the most loyal alumni network among any b-school. It does however have 2 disadvantages. First, its remote location makes it harder for students to network with firms. Second, its small alumni network is also a liability. They do well in consulting and banking and to a lesser extent some of the investment management firms in boston.

    Yale is IMO not a great school, and I don't get the hype. Maybe I'm missing something here. Yes, Dean Snyder is a great dean, and the new building opening up in december 2013 looks great. But Yale SOM is a fairly young program; consequently, its alumni network is very weak, and it just doesn't get respect from major recruiters. Will this change in the next 5-10 years? Perhaps, but you're not paying $150K to attend a school that might pay off in the long-term if SOM rapidly moves up in the rankings. You want to spend the money for a school that is currently respected and can get you opportunities coming out. Yale over Stern for finance makes no sense to me, and Yale over Kellogg for anything, is ridiculous.

    For me at least, Yale over Stern would be a no-brainer just due to Yale's strict grade non-disclosure; YSOM seems like a whole lot of fun, and obviously places plenty of people (27% in IB according to the most recent report) in finance if that's your thing. Stern's (maybe completely undeserved) reputation is one of a school full of uber-competitive finance dudes who didn't get into Columbia.

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    SirTradesaLot's picture

    .

    adapt or die wrote:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • In reply to holla_back
    TheLastCall's picture

    holla_back wrote:
    TheLastCall wrote:

    Tuck does have probably the most loyal alumni network among any b-school. It does however have 2 disadvantages. First, its remote location makes it harder for students to network with firms. Second, its small alumni network is also a liability. They do well in consulting and banking and to a lesser extent some of the investment management firms in boston.

    Yale is IMO not a great school, and I don't get the hype. Maybe I'm missing something here. Yes, Dean Snyder is a great dean, and the new building opening up in december 2013 looks great. But Yale SOM is a fairly young program; consequently, its alumni network is very weak, and it just doesn't get respect from major recruiters. Will this change in the next 5-10 years? Perhaps, but you're not paying $150K to attend a school that might pay off in the long-term if SOM rapidly moves up in the rankings. You want to spend the money for a school that is currently respected and can get you opportunities coming out. Yale over Stern for finance makes no sense to me, and Yale over Kellogg for anything, is ridiculous.

    For me at least, Yale over Stern would be a no-brainer just due to Yale's strict grade non-disclosure; YSOM seems like a whole lot of fun, and obviously places plenty of people (27% in IB according to the most recent report) in finance if that's your thing. Stern's (maybe completely undeserved) reputation is one of a school full of uber-competitive finance dudes who didn't get into Columbia.

    Yes, stern is full of very bitter columbia rejects who have a chip on their shoulders. My friends at "better" schools have always said disparaging things about them. Nonetheless, stern is still more respected than yale in finance, and its NYC location is pretty sweet. Maybe Yale SOM has secretly been on the rise, and I just haven't known about it. Also, i'm not sure how much fun SOM is since new haven sucks, and on the yale campus they are seen as a joke, akin to education students at harvard.

  • shorttheworld's picture

    the retardedness of some of you on this board confounds me, even as a state school kid

  • In reply to shorttheworld
    SirTradesaLot's picture

    shorttheworld wrote:
    the retardedness of some of you on this board confounds me, even as a state school kid

    Agreed.

    adapt or die wrote:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • In reply to shorttheworld
    ReluctantMBA's picture

    shorttheworld wrote:
    the retardedness of some of you on this board confounds me, even as a state school kid

    I always consider the source before taking any of the posts on this board seriously. I can't listen to people who have never even gotten into a b-school.

  • In reply to shorttheworld
    trailmix8's picture

    shorttheworld wrote:
    the retardedness of some of you on this board confounds me, even as a state school kid

    double agreed

  • cinnamontoastcrunch's picture

    Round 1:

    Harvard
    Stanford
    Wharton

    Will submit for Columbia depending on R1 outcomes.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Brady. I know you are reading this. Get off the computer and go have fun. It's a sunday.

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:

    Yes, stern is full of very bitter columbia rejects who have a chip on their shoulders.


    The old IP would have found a bit of irony in this statement. Case in point: seedy_underbelly on the forums.

    But there are smarter people than both of us at stern and columbia, and some of them will be more successful than we will be. And they're both good schools.

    Also, a shout-out to Haas who has made the M7 the M8 by beating out one of the M7s in the US News Rankings.

    Congratulations, Berkeley. It's nice to see a state school up there.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    TheLastCall's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    TheLastCall wrote:

    Yes, stern is full of very bitter columbia rejects who have a chip on their shoulders.


    The old IP would have found a bit of irony in this statement. Case in point: seedy_underbelly on the forums.

    But there are smarter people than both of us at stern and columbia, and some of them will be more successful than we will be. And they're both good schools.

    Also, a shout-out to Haas who has made the M7 the M8 by beating out one of the M7s in the US News Rankings.

    Congratulations, Berkeley. It's nice to see a state school up there.

    I have no idea who seedy_underbelly is.

    Yes, I'm sure there are smarter and more sucessful people than us at stern/columbia. How does that refute my assertion though? On the WHOLE, Stern is packed with very bitter finance gunners who couldn't get in anywhere better. Case in point. A good friend went to a top undergrad, 780 gmat, traded options at a top proprietary shop before moving over to a very large macro hedge fund, got dinged at hbs/wharton/sloan/columbia/booth and only got into stern. He's there now and thinks it's ok but is pretty bitter about it and has a huge chip on his shoulders. Many of his classmates are the same way.

    Haas is good for consulting/tech. Terrible for finance.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Quote:
    Yes, I'm sure there are smarter and more sucessful people than us at stern/columbia. How does that refute my assertion though? On the WHOLE, Stern is packed with very bitter finance gunners who couldn't get in anywhere better.

    I disagree with this. Stern hands out hundreds of full rides every year. If I had to choose between Stern with a scholarship and any M7 besides Chicago or HBS without a scholarship, I personally would choose Stern. $160K at 30 is a LOT of future value.

    Stern is an excellent MBA program with a huge geographical advantage- even over Columbia. Firms don't fly or drive to NYU; they walk. And they have a very strong focus on Finance.

    Quote:
    Case in point. A good friend went to a top undergrad, 780 GMAT, traded options at a top proprietary shop before moving over to a very large macro hedge fund, got dinged at hbs/wharton/sloan/columbia/booth and only got into stern. He's there now and thinks it's ok but is pretty bitter about it and has a huge chip on his shoulders. Many of his classmates are the same way.

    Sure, some of them are. I'm sure some folks at HBS are a bit bitter too. The truly brilliant do not need grad school. (I say that as someone in grad school; I'd like to think I'm humble about it rather than bitter.)

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    TheLastCall's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Quote:
    Yes, I'm sure there are smarter and more sucessful people than us at stern/columbia. How does that refute my assertion though? On the WHOLE, Stern is packed with very bitter finance gunners who couldn't get in anywhere better.

    I disagree with this. Stern hands out hundreds of full rides every year. If I had to choose between Stern with a scholarship and any M7 besides Chicago or HBS without a scholarship, I personally would choose Stern. $160K at 30 is a LOT of future value.

    Stern is an excellent MBA program with a huge geographical advantage- even over Columbia. Firms don't fly or drive to NYU; they walk. And they have a very strong focus on Finance.

    Quote:
    Case in point. A good friend went to a top undergrad, 780 GMAT, traded options at a top proprietary shop before moving over to a very large macro hedge fund, got dinged at hbs/wharton/sloan/columbia/booth and only got into stern. He's there now and thinks it's ok but is pretty bitter about it and has a huge chip on his shoulders. Many of his classmates are the same way.

    Sure, some of them are. I'm sure some folks at HBS are a bit bitter too. The truly brilliant do not need grad school. (I say that as someone in grad school; I'd like to think I'm humble about it rather than bitter.)

    "Hundreds of full rides" is a huge overstatement. Please refrain from misinformed hyperbole.

    NYU has a huge geographic advantage over columbia? Are you freaking kidding me? Yes, Stern is closer to a lot of these firms, but the columbia b-students eat the sternies for lunch when it comes to finance recruiting.

    No one I know at HBS is bitter about being at HBS. Maybe they're bitter about not landing that gig at KKR or blackstone or paulson.

    I also disagree that the truly brilliant do not need grad school. It really depends on what you want to do. A CS genius with his own successful start-up does not need it. But the brilliant finance guy who works at a megafund PE will most likely go to HBS/Stanford.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Quote:
    No one I know at HBS is bitter about being at HBS. Maybe they're bitter about not landing that gig at KKR or Blackstone or paulson.

    HBS has a 90% placement rate, but just about everyone going into HBS had to quit some sort of a job. Ergo, 10% of their graduates are unemployed.

    Quote:
    I also disagree that the truly brilliant do not need grad school. It really depends on what you want to do. A CS genius with his own successful start-up does not need it. But the brilliant finance guy who works at a megafund PE will most likely go to HBS/Stanford.

    There are so many more interesting things to do than grad school. I could go hang gliding every day. I could go surfing in Hawaii. Instead I am here working on qq plots and behavioral finance models.

    The truly brilliant person is a guy in his 20s who has a business that allows him to have those kinds of options.

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    GS's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:

    t. A good friend went to a top undergrad, 780 gmat, traded options at a top proprietary shop before moving over to a very large macro hedge fund, got dinged at hbs/wharton/sloan/columbia/booth and only got into stern. He's there now and thinks it's ok but is pretty bitter about it and has a huge chip on his shoulders. Many of his classmates are the same way.
    .


    No offence , but
    This story is REALLY setting off my bullshit meter here. Sloan/Wharton/Booth are totally fine with traders who have top undergrads, good GPAs and High GMATs. Something else must be the confounding factor here.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    wannabeaballer's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:

    Also, a shout-out to Haas who has made the M7 the M8 by beating out one of the M7s in the US News Rankings.

    Congratulations, Berkeley. It's nice to see a state school up there.

    I was under the impression that the M7 was an annual conference among the deans of 7 business schools and had nothing to do with rankings.

  • In reply to GS
    TheLastCall's picture

    <a href="http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/company/goldman-sachs" rel="nofollow">GS</a> wrote:
    TheLastCall wrote:

    t. A good friend went to a top undergrad, 780 gmat, traded options at a top proprietary shop before moving over to a very large macro hedge fund, got dinged at hbs/wharton/sloan/columbia/booth and only got into stern. He's there now and thinks it's ok but is pretty bitter about it and has a huge chip on his shoulders. Many of his classmates are the same way.
    .


    No offence , but
    This story is REALLY setting off my bullshit meter here. Sloan/Wharton/Booth are totally fine with traders who have top undergrads, good GPAs and High GMATs. Something else must be the confounding factor here.

    I know multiple traders with credentials similar to this guy who did not get into top 5 mba programs. I don't know why this is so "shocking." I did not read their essays, recs, or see their interview, so maybe they messed up somewhere there. Also, traders do not have the type of experience/skillset that b-schools are looking for, especially a school such as HBS, which is all case studies. How would an exotic equity derivatives trader add value to class discussions in say strategy, marketing, accounting, entrepreneurship?

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    TheLastCall's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Quote:
    No one I know at HBS is bitter about being at HBS. Maybe they're bitter about not landing that gig at KKR or Blackstone or paulson.

    HBS has a 90% placement rate, but just about everyone going into HBS had to quit some sort of a job. Ergo, 10% of their graduates are unemployed.

    Quote:
    I also disagree that the truly brilliant do not need grad school. It really depends on what you want to do. A CS genius with his own successful start-up does not need it. But the brilliant finance guy who works at a megafund PE will most likely go to HBS/Stanford.

    There are so many more interesting things to do than grad school. I could go hang gliding every day. I could go surfing in Hawaii. Instead I am here working on qq plots and behavioral finance models.

    The truly brilliant person is a guy in his 20s who has a business that allows him to have those kinds of options.

    If I'm not mistaken you're doing a masters finance program at princeton, which is quite rigorous, and you're surrounded by super smart quant geeks who are probably still virgins. Of course that's not fun. Who would rather do stochastic calculus than go hang gliding or surfing? I think you would be singing a different tune though if you were at a top b-school and going out 4-5 times a week and not having to worry since there's grade non-disclosure.

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    ReluctantMBA's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:
    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Quote:
    No one I know at HBS is bitter about being at HBS. Maybe they're bitter about not landing that gig at KKR or Blackstone or paulson.

    HBS has a 90% placement rate, but just about everyone going into HBS had to quit some sort of a job. Ergo, 10% of their graduates are unemployed.

    Quote:
    I also disagree that the truly brilliant do not need grad school. It really depends on what you want to do. A CS genius with his own successful start-up does not need it. But the brilliant finance guy who works at a megafund PE will most likely go to HBS/Stanford.

    There are so many more interesting things to do than grad school. I could go hang gliding every day. I could go surfing in Hawaii. Instead I am here working on qq plots and behavioral finance models.

    The truly brilliant person is a guy in his 20s who has a business that allows him to have those kinds of options.

    If I'm not mistaken you're doing a masters finance program at princeton, which is quite rigorous, and you're surrounded by super smart quant geeks who are probably still virgins. Of course that's not fun. Who would rather do stochastic calculus than go hang gliding or surfing? I think you would be singing a different tune though if you were at a top b-school and going out 4-5 times a week and not having to worry since there's grade non-disclosure.


    B-school is definitely a ton of fun and very social. However, people still care about academics (even with grade non disclosure). GND doesn't last forever and with all the group work required being a slacker isn't good for one's social capital. You appear to have some friends at top schools. However, I think you may be projecting their experiences a bit too broadly. I have yet to hear anyone at my school (or the other ones to which I was accepted) talk like your friends.

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    GS's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:
    <a href="http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/company/goldman-sachs" rel="nofollow">GS</a> wrote:
    TheLastCall wrote:

    t. A good friend went to a top undergrad, 780 gmat, traded options at a top proprietary shop before moving over to a very large macro hedge fund, got dinged at hbs/wharton/sloan/columbia/booth and only got into stern. He's there now and thinks it's ok but is pretty bitter about it and has a huge chip on his shoulders. Many of his classmates are the same way.
    .


    No offence , but
    This story is REALLY setting off my bullshit meter here. Sloan/Wharton/Booth are totally fine with traders who have top undergrads, good GPAs and High GMATs. Something else must be the confounding factor here.

    I know multiple traders with credentials similar to this guy who did not get into top 5 mba programs. I don't know why this is so "shocking." I did not read their essays, recs, or see their interview, so maybe they messed up somewhere there. Also, traders do not have the type of experience/skillset that b-schools are looking for, especially a school such as HBS, which is all case studies. How would an exotic equity derivatives trader add value to class discussions in say strategy, marketing, accounting, entrepreneurship?

    Again, he wouldn't add more/less value than someone who had worked for TFA or the Peace Corps or the United Nations. We're also forgetting Wharton which is more quantitative and rigorous.
    Every single trader whom I know with a good UG, good GPA, good GMAT has gotten into a top 5 MBA school. Again, I don't think you're lying outright. I just think that you're making the truth much MUCH dourer than it is to try and support your point.

  • LTV's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:
    I think you would be singing a different tune though if you were at a top b-school and going out 4-5 times a week and not having to worry since there's grade non-disclosure.

    TheLastCall wrote:
    Yes, stern is full of very bitter columbia rejects who have a chip on their shoulders. My friends at "better" schools have always said disparaging things about them.

    Did Brady create a new WSO account?

  • In reply to LTV
    GS's picture

    LTV wrote:
    TheLastCall wrote:
    I think you would be singing a different tune though if you were at a top b-school and going out 4-5 times a week and not having to worry since there's grade non-disclosure.

    TheLastCall wrote:
    Yes, stern is full of very bitter columbia rejects who have a chip on their shoulders. My friends at "better" schools have always said disparaging things about them.

    Did Brady create a new WSO account?

    All of this guys posts are on B school topics so far. This pushes the odds dramatically in favour of your hypothesis.

  • Relinquis's picture

    A lot of accomplished young professionals find the idea of quitting their good jobs and going to business school full time for two years to read Porters and Drucker and circle jerk to Jack Welsh biographies a bit... well... onerous. Especially when they can party, travel internationally and have an active social/outdoors life while working.

    BUT, it's pretty clear than having a graduate degree from a top school is important in terms of white collar career options/hedging and progression in the medium term. I can see how that can be a source of bitterness in terms of having to conform to the standardised requirements of the big corporations that recruit from top schools.

    Personally, I would love to study urban economics and behavioral finance, but I know that career-wise an MBA from a top real estate school would be better for my REPE career in the medium term. Even though I already have a business degree.

    I'll probably apply 2nd round to Wharton, Columbia, MIT for MBAs and maybe Oxbridge/LSE for specialised masters in finance and/or real estate. Maybe I'll be able to squeeze in some history/IR modules if I end up at B-School as an educational compromise.

  • In reply to GS
    DagwoodDeluxe's picture

    Haha I was reading this on my phone and accidentally gave you a SB and monkey poo for this post - sorry about that! Hopefully they net out...

    Anyway, as for me I am applying to HBS, GSB, and Kellogg in R1.

  • In reply to DagwoodDeluxe
    GS's picture

    DagwoodDeluxe wrote:
    Haha I was reading this on my phone and accidentally gave you a SB and monkey poo for this post - sorry about that! Hopefully they net out...

    Anyway, as for me I am applying to HBS, GSB, and Kellogg in R1.

    Yo Man.. SB me to make it square. Otherwise that's not cool!

  • Cmoss's picture

    UT Dallas here I come!

  • In reply to Relinquis
    huanleshalemei's picture

    Relinquis wrote:
    I'll probably apply 2nd round to Wharton, Columbia, MIT for MBAs and maybe Oxbridge/LSE for specialised masters in finance and/or real estate.

    Hey, I think real estate is very local, are you sure you want to cast a net that wide?

    The Auto Show

  • In reply to GS
    DagwoodDeluxe's picture

    <a href="http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/company/goldman-sachs" rel="nofollow">GS</a> wrote:
    DagwoodDeluxe wrote:
    Haha I was reading this on my phone and accidentally gave you a SB and monkey poo for this post - sorry about that! Hopefully they net out...

    Anyway, as for me I am applying to HBS, GSB, and Kellogg in R1.

    Yo Man.. SB me to make it square. Otherwise that's not cool!

    I thought I did SB you? (After I realized I monkey poo'd you I immediately gave you a SB ... Or at least I thought I did). Let me know if it didn't work and I'll dish one out. Sorry again ab that.

  • In reply to DagwoodDeluxe
    TheLastCall's picture

    DagwoodDeluxe wrote:
    <a href="http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/company/goldman-sachs" rel="nofollow">GS</a> wrote:
    DagwoodDeluxe wrote:
    Haha I was reading this on my phone and accidentally gave you a SB and monkey poo for this post - sorry about that! Hopefully they net out...

    Anyway, as for me I am applying to HBS, GSB, and Kellogg in R1.

    Yo Man.. SB me to make it square. Otherwise that's not cool!

    I thought I did SB you? (After I realized I monkey poo'd you I immediately gave you a SB ... Or at least I thought I did). Let me know if it didn't work and I'll dish one out. Sorry again ab that.

    Awesome. Bros looking out for bros.

  • shorttheworld's picture

    exit brady, enter thelastcall

    new wso whipping boy hath been founded

  • In reply to cphbravo96
    Ron Paul's picture

    cphbravo96 wrote:
    Round 2 applicant here.

    Darden
    Fuqua
    Kenan-Flagler

    I'm trying to decide on some others with Vanderbilt and Emory being possibilities. Depending on where my GMAT comes out, I might put in an application to HBS.

    Career aspirations? I would like to get into a general MM PE shop, but realize that might be tough given my background, etc. I will definitely recruit for MM and boutique IBs like Harris Williams, BlackArch Partners, etc. and hope to make a transition to a reputable PEG after a couple of years as an IB associate, assuming I decide I don't want to stay where I'm at.

    Anyone else looking at similar schools, similar paths, etc.?

    Regards


    How sure are you that you'll have a tough time getting into PE in the South? I'm curious b/c I'm a Southerner as well. As I'm sure you know, growth/lower-MM PE is much different in the South than buyout or even MM PE in the major finance hubs. It's "easier" to get into, you don't have to have gone on "the path" i.e. prestigious 2-year IB program > 2yrs prestigious pre-MBA PE Associate position > Top 3 MBA.

    From the profiles I've seen, I would think you would be able to go straight into Southern growth PE post-MBA given your pre-MBA experience (Though you'd know better than me. I'm just saying my opinion). But maybe it's a lot tougher to break in if you're aiming for a larger MM firm, even if it's still in the South? Regardless, I don't get why you'd go into IB or how it would help, other than providing a fallback post-MBA position.

  • In reply to shorttheworld
    TheLastCall's picture

    shorttheworld wrote:
    exit brady, enter thelastcall

    new wso whipping boy hath been founded

    I'm sorry, but who the heck is brady? I've seen his name mentioned multiple times on threads about b-school. Which school is he at?

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    huanleshalemei's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:
    shorttheworld wrote:
    exit brady, enter thelastcall

    new wso whipping boy hath been founded

    I'm sorry, but who the heck is brady? I've seen his name mentioned multiple times on threads about b-school. Which school is he at?

    His bio is common knowledge, either on wikipedia already or you can google it. this name chills me inside out.

    The Auto Show

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    GS's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:
    shorttheworld wrote:
    exit brady, enter thelastcall

    new wso whipping boy hath been founded

    I'm sorry, but who the heck is brady? I've seen his name mentioned multiple times on threads about b-school. Which school is he at?

    I'm talking to the Man in the Mirror
    I'm asking him to change his ways
    And no message could have been any clearer

  • In reply to Ron Paul
    cphbravo96's picture

    Ron Paul wrote:
    How sure are you that you'll have a tough time getting into PE in the South? I'm curious b/c I'm a Southerner as well. As I'm sure you know, growth/lower-MM PE is much different in the South than buyout or even MM PE in the major finance hubs. It's "easier" to get into, you don't have to have gone on "the path" i.e. prestigious 2-year IB program > 2yrs prestigious pre-MBA PE Associate position > Top 3 MBA.

    From the profiles I've seen, I would think you would be able to go straight into Southern growth PE post-MBA given your pre-MBA experience (Though you'd know better than me. I'm just saying my opinion). But maybe it's a lot tougher to break in if you're aiming for a larger MM firm, even if it's still in the South? Regardless, I don't get why you'd go into IB or how it would help, other than providing a fallback post-MBA position.

    Honestly, I'm not sure at all. I do think it's a possibility, I'm just uncertain as to how likely...so I just want to set my expectations to the appropriate level. Trust when I say that I am not placing IB in first place but it will be a close second.

    I do hope I'll get the PE recruiting attention I'm looking for coming out of school but it's hard to say whether that will materialize. I do have pre-MBA buyside experience, but it's very specialized, or is typically viewed that way, and that's what makes me uncertain about my chances.

    Ideally I will be able to use my network and get some traction with interviews and from there I will be able to show off what I know and get an offer, but if need be, I will do IB for a few years and then make the transition.

    But I agree, PE in the South is much different from the NE. You see all sorts of abnormal backgrounds, etc. and it seems that it would be a bit easier to break in. I think the one caveat there is that the number of opportunities will be far fewer in the South and much more infrequent, so timing and luck becomes very important.

    Regards

    "The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
    - Ronald Reagan

  • In reply to cphbravo96
    TheLastCall's picture

    cphbravo96 wrote:
    Ron Paul wrote:
    How sure are you that you'll have a tough time getting into PE in the South? I'm curious b/c I'm a Southerner as well. As I'm sure you know, growth/lower-MM PE is much different in the South than buyout or even MM PE in the major finance hubs. It's "easier" to get into, you don't have to have gone on "the path" i.e. prestigious 2-year IB program > 2yrs prestigious pre-MBA PE Associate position > Top 3 MBA.

    From the profiles I've seen, I would think you would be able to go straight into Southern growth PE post-MBA given your pre-MBA experience (Though you'd know better than me. I'm just saying my opinion). But maybe it's a lot tougher to break in if you're aiming for a larger MM firm, even if it's still in the South? Regardless, I don't get why you'd go into IB or how it would help, other than providing a fallback post-MBA position.

    Honestly, I'm not sure at all. I do think it's a possibility, I'm just uncertain as to how likely...so I just want to set my expectations to the appropriate level. Trust when I say that I am not placing IB in first place but it will be a close second.

    I do hope I'll get the PE recruiting attention I'm looking for coming out of school but it's hard to say whether that will materialize. I do have pre-MBA buyside experience, but it's very specialized, or is typically viewed that way, and that's what makes me uncertain about my chances.

    Ideally I will be able to use my network and get some traction with interviews and from there I will be able to show off what I know and get an offer, but if need be, I will do IB for a few years and then make the transition.

    But I agree, PE in the South is much different from the NE. You see all sorts of abnormal backgrounds, etc. and it seems that it would be a bit easier to break in. I think the one caveat there is that the number of opportunities will be far fewer in the South and much more infrequent, so timing and luck becomes very important.

    Regards

    Are you at all open to schools in the northeast? You're ex-military, so a lot of the top east coast schools would love you. Or are you 110% set on staying in the South? If so, fuqua/darden would be your best bets, with UNC a bit behind. Do NOT go to emory however.

  • In reply to huanleshalemei
    Relinquis's picture

    huanleshalemei wrote:
    Relinquis wrote:
    I'll probably apply 2nd round to Wharton, Columbia, MIT for MBAs and maybe Oxbridge/LSE for specialised masters in finance and/or real estate.

    Hey, I think real estate is very local, are you sure you want to cast a net that wide?


    I already have several years real estate private equity experience and have invested in half a dozen countries, so my network is pretty good/broad.

    A real estate finance/economics degree would be much shorter (1 year) and I might be able to combine it with a one year MBA at INSEAD/Oxford in the time that would take me to do a US MBA (2 years) if I go down that route.

  • Silchasruin99's picture

    I'm suprised by how few people here seem to apply to HBS and GSB.

  • MonkeyMath's picture

    Round 1:

    HBS
    Stanford
    Wharton
    Chicago (part time)
    Tuck
    MIT - LGO program

    Round 2:
    Vanderbilt (rolling)
    Columbia (rolling)
    Kellogg (part time)
    Yale

  • In reply to TheLastCall
    cphbravo96's picture

    TheLastCall wrote:
    Are you at all open to schools in the northeast? You're ex-military, so a lot of the top east coast schools would love you. Or are you 110% set on staying in the South? If so, fuqua/darden would be your best bets, with UNC a bit behind. Do NOT go to emory however.

    Yeah, I would consider any school really. I'm just not confident on my eligibility given that I haven't taken the GMAT yet, I went to an unknown UG and I was 'only' enlisted (not an officer) while I was in the Army.

    Not to toot my own horn, but I tend to be a guy that people like once we meet face-to-face but obviously the initial step is coming across great on paper...which can be an uphill battle for me given my 'better than most but not quite as good as the best' stats.

    If you have suggestions on schools I am open to checking them out. If I do well enough on the GMAT, I decided I would put in an application at HBS. A large part of my reluctance just has to do with how well I think my personality matches with the schools in the NE...though my assumptions could be off and I could be applying far too much weight to that particular factor.

    Also, what's the beef with Emory. Honestly, it's near the bottom of my list so hopefully a 'backup' but is there a specific reason why you feel the way you do?

    Regards

    "The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
    - Ronald Reagan

  • Silchasruin99's picture

    Who is this brady guy and what are his stats? Is he an HBS guy? People mention him non stop

  • In reply to Silchasruin99
    IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Silchasruin99 wrote:
    Who is this brady guy and what are his stats? Is he an HBS guy? People mention him non stop

    Brady is a former member who graduated from an Ivy League undergrad. He is constantly worried that this does not give him enough prestige because he never got an M7 MBA.

  • Silchasruin99's picture

    But he has a Booth MBA, isn't that good enough? What happened to him? Hope he is ok.

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