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4/9/13

So, Veritas Prep just blabbed about the 570 GMAT-er who got into HBS being a client of theirs. They also oh-so-helpfully posted a bunch of information about this client being an elite-level athlete with >20,000 Twitter followers, and now everyone knows that the gentleman in question is none other than former Bronco/Falcon/Raven Domonique Foxworth.

Dude's GMAT is obviously far from stellar, and his work experience has mostly involved smashing into other people. That said, his experience also included a lot of teamwork, leadership, and hard work, plus his college academic record was apparently pretty solid. Decent enough to prove that he's no bumbling fool.

Thoughts?

Comments (212)

Best Response
4/8/13

Are you guys seriously arguing that an NFL cornerback and former head of the NFL Players Union should be less impressive to an AdCom than Analyst #78 in Goldman Sachs Industrials, Waste Management and Utilities silo who interned at the Boys and Girls Club once a month?

This site is ridiculous.

Accepted.com
4/8/13

Great to see an athlete try something useful for a change.

Please NFL vets, no more used car dealerships. Ok? Ok.

Either way, good job Dominique. Kudos.

"Those who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin

4/8/13

570 AFTER going through prep class is just wow..

In reply to bearcats
4/8/13

bearcats:
570 AFTER going through prep class is just wow..

Nothing to be proud of.

"Those who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin

4/8/13

Black October just got a whole lot more interesting. He's gonna be slayinnnn

4/8/13

He's a famous jock; he probably hasn't done real homework since he was in junior high. Given his unique profile and Harvard's history of not caring about the GMAT, it's understandable they'd take a flyer on him.

4/8/13

He's also President of the NFLPA which distinguishes him from most candidates.

4/8/13
4/8/13

what a joke. lost a lot of respect for HBS. why even require work experience if playing in the NFL qualifies as work experience?

4/8/13
4/8/13

Eh, not that surprised he got in. The women on b-school adcoms get pretty excited by NFL players and athletes in general. Everybody knows that mba admissions is total fluff, so this shouldn't come as a surprise.

4/8/13

I think the most important question regarding his application is whether the 570 was before or after people started repeatedly hitting his head on the ground

In reply to triplectz
4/8/13

triplectz:
Are you guys seriously arguing that an NFL cornerback and former head of the NFL Players Union should be less impressive to an AdCom than Analyst #78 in Goldman Sachs Industrials, Waste Management and Utilities silo who interned at the Boys and Girls Club once a month?

This site is ridiculous.

Is he gay? http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2013/03/28/do...

4/8/13

Personally, I agree with HBS' decision to take him on as a student. Sure, his GMAT's on the low end. If I were a betting man, however, I would still wager that he's going to do better than the average HBS graduate in terms of post-graduation career trajectory. He must have a shitload of contacts in the sports industry, and he's already proven that other people like him enough to install him as the NFLPA's President.

All in all... I think he's actually a relatively safe candidate for HBS to take in.

In reply to Angus Macgyver
4/8/13

Angus Macgyver:
Personally, I agree with HBS' decision to take him on as a student. Sure, his GMAT's on the low end. If I were a betting man, however, I would still wager that he's going to do better than the average HBS graduate in terms of post-graduation career trajectory. He must have a shitload of contacts in the sports industry, and he's already proven that other people like him enough to install him as the NFLPA's President.

All in all... I think he's actually a relatively safe candidate for HBS to take in.

I agree more or less with this. We're talking about MBA, not a stem phd program. He will add a lot of value to the HBS brand since he's already made great money and has tons of contacts in the sports industry.

4/8/13

Foxworth4MVP?

I hate victims who respect their executioners

In reply to triplectz
4/8/13

triplectz:
Are you guys seriously arguing that an NFL cornerback and former head of the NFL Players Union should be less impressive to an AdCom than Analyst #78 in Goldman Sachs Industrials, Waste Management and Utilities silo who interned at the Boys and Girls Club once a month?

This site is ridiculous.

Head of the NFL players union is particularly impressive to me. Being respected enough by your peers to have them entrust you with that responsibility says a lot about his leadership ability. People who think scoring above a 700 on the GMAT is more impressive than that are delusional.

This to all my hatin' folks seeing me getting guac right now..

In reply to Angus Macgyver
4/8/13

Angus Macgyver:
If I were a betting man, however, I would still wager that he's going to do better than the average HBS graduate in terms of post-graduation career trajectory.
Honestly, he could join PWM as a broker and absolutely rake it in just by getting players and former players as clients.

adapt or die:
What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

MY BLOG

4/8/13

This is ridiculous...... I don't care about his "leadership" background or whatever. A 570 has to be borderline retarded. Honestly, anyone else gets a 570 and they don't have a shot anywhere other than Tennessee Martin or some garbage. This is yet another example of the world gone mad. American business is becoming laughable with the likes of Jay Z and Puff Daddy being considered businessmen. Now we have to endure knuckleheads like this matriculating at our finest school. Of course everyone will cheer this, but come on it's truly absurd.

4/8/13

I think he's more than qualified to get into HBS, sure he scored low on the GMAT. But how many other candidates can say that they sat across the negotiating table from the 32 NFL owners and hammered out a CBA for the NFLPA.

Interesting side note, Domonique Foxworth's wife graduated from Harvard Law. I think thats pretty cool to not have a gold digging wife.

The NFL also has an agreement with Kellog and HBS, check the quote out below from a few years ago:

"Current and former starting quarterbacks BYRON LEFTWICH, JOHN BECK, CHARLIE BATCH, BRUCE GRADKOWSKI and BRADY QUINN are among the 66 players who have enrolled in the NFL Business Management and Entrepreneurial Program at Harvard Business School and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University"

4/8/13

great job by HBS...it just goes to show that extracurriculars can be more important than your GMAT number

I eat success for breakfast...with skim milk

4/8/13

I'd much rather have him in my class than some boring Asian IT or accounting guy with no social skills. Not trying to be mean but I am sure most people feel the same.

I went to a few admit weekends at the schools I got admitted into and I was shocked by some people I met there. No personality, only able to talk about job related subjects, not willing to drink or partake in social activities and not even nice or modest.

4/8/13

Haters gonna hate.

Congrats to him, very different from your average HBS applicant. If it was up to you guys, I'm sure a class at HBS will be full of guys who came from IB/PE/VC/HF with one week volunteering at the homeless shelter. And the class might even be dominated by group-thinkers.

Outside of the 570 GMAT, his resume is pretty impressive if you ask me.

How many NFL players have gone to bschool?
How easy is it to become the president of the NFLPA?

I wouldn't be surprise if Myron Rolle (FSU Rhodes Scholar) takes a stab at business school in the near future.

In reply to subrosa
4/8/13

subrosa:
This is ridiculous...... I don't care about his "leadership" background or whatever. A 570 has to be borderline retarded. Honestly, anyone else gets a 570 and they don't have a shot anywhere other than Tennessee Martin or some garbage. This is yet another example of the world gone mad. American business is becoming laughable with the likes of Jay Z and Puff Daddy being considered businessmen. Now we have to endure knuckleheads like this matriculating at our finest school. Of course everyone will cheer this, but come on it's truly absurd.

racist/jealous

Maternity is a matter of fact, paternity is a matter of opinion.

In reply to subrosa
4/8/13

subrosa:
American business is becoming laughable with the likes of Jay Z and Puff Daddy being considered businessmen.

Why? They are both worth well in to the hundreds of millions. They clearly know their market segment and how to exploit it. Is that not the very definition of great american business men? I'm sure you, just as basically 99.9% of posters on this site will be a salary slave your whole life and create nothing. Or is there some other reason that its become laughable...

4/8/13

If you don't think playing several years in the NFL while serving on its executive committee is as impressive as playing with Microsoft Office for 14/hrs a day, you are literally outside of your mind. Besides, I'm sure this guy will enjoy himself as much as Desmond Bryant. NFL teams and top schools are extremely similar on a cultural basis.

In reply to subrosa
4/8/13

subrosa:
This is ridiculous...... I don't care about his "leadership" background or whatever. A 570 has to be borderline retarded. Honestly, anyone else gets a 570 and they don't have a shot anywhere other than Tennessee Martin or some garbage. This is yet another example of the world gone mad. American business is becoming laughable with the likes of Jay Z and Puff Daddy being considered businessmen. Now we have to endure knuckleheads like this matriculating at our finest school. Of course everyone will cheer this, but come on it's truly absurd.

You jelly brah??

"When you expect things to happen - strangely enough - they do happen."
- JP Morgan

Accepted.com
4/8/13

His gmat is crazy low but his background is highly unique, so I think it's justified assuming he can keep up with the curriculum. Here's another data point: Jason Wright has similar background but with a much higher GMAT and it looks like he was denied from HBS (assuming he applied and he would have gone there if accepted). Ended up at McKinsey however so either way it ended well for him.
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=106728782&...

4/8/13

Let's take a moment and reflect on Brady's (probably subrosa) suicidal thoughts right now.

4/8/13

72% of African Americans score lower than 500 on the GMAT, so I wouldn't hold the 570 against him too much in that context (only slightly

4/8/13

To HBS - This is trash. He's going to significantly hamper every group he's in because he will be able to contribute little to nothing. Why? Because at the end of the day he is just not that intelligent.

To Domonique - Good for you.

4/8/13

You have a hell of a higher chance of getting 720+ on a GMAT than getting into the NFL, just saying. Yeah 570 is quite low, but as others have said, everything else on his resume is quite unique and superb. How often do you see pro athletes (with proven leadership, teamwork, ability to work under stress skills) apply for elite business schools compared to your typical finance guy?

4/8/13

He scored in the 59th percentile. While that's not remotely exceptional, it's not "lolbad". Considering the guy probably hasn't had to read anything other than a playbook since high school (if then), his score isn't god-awful. Taking into account his exceptional leadership experience, "extracurriculars", charitable endeavors, and the fact that he has countless industry contacts and will undoubtedly make a fortune upon exiting HBS, I wouldn't think twice about admitting him if I were an adcom.

In reply to prn927
4/8/13

prn927:
what a joke. lost a lot of respect for HBS. why even require work experience if playing in the NFL qualifies as work experience?

This is a very dumb statement

4/8/13

Hbs also admitted dubya's personal assistant who didn't even have a bachelors. No one was up in arms.

4/8/13

Not to mention you are all assuming, which is a huge assumption, that he even studied for the gmat.

For all we know he told it once and blind, knowing it would be irrelevant in his particular case.

How many stupid 570 -> 700+ success stories do people write on here or gmatclub.

Did he study or did he take it blind, who knows, but assuming that is his best an final score errors more on the side or racist/jealous than not.

In reply to triplectz
4/8/13

triplectz:
Are you guys seriously arguing that an NFL cornerback and former head of the NFL Players Union should be less impressive to an AdCom than Analyst #78 in Goldman Sachs Industrials, Waste Management and Utilities silo who interned at the Boys and Girls Club once a month?

This site is ridiculous.


I know right, he's clearly far more talented than any ibanker
4/8/13

LOL at the basement dwelling aspie virgins getting their panties in a bunch about a 570 GMAT getting into HBS. I don't know if you bros are mad, jelly, or both.

4/8/13

He just wrote his ticket to a sweet front office job in the NFL.

The people hating on his GMAT are idiots. Leading the NFLPA is extremely impressive and speaks a lot about what his colleagues think of him. It's much more impressive than some geek that got top bucket once. Haters on this site today...

Somebody's flag football team just got a lot better.

4/8/13

Good for him. Who cares if he didn't "earn" it or "deserve" it in some traditional sense - he got it and that's all that matters. Bunch of cry babies whining about how it isn't fair.

4/8/13

I understand being an athlete requires you to be a "team player" and a "leader" or sorts, but let's get real.

Tons of people have these experiences (obviously not pro athlete level), but you really think this guy is that much value-add to the HBS class? Being a professional athlete, where much of your life is regimented and planned out for you, and being an independent-thinking leader in the business world are two different things. Pro athletes are told what to eat, how to save their money, how to spend their money, how to train, how to look in public, how to basically do everything; Not much independent thought involved.

Sure he comes from a very interesting background, but come on folks.

Super Nintendo, Sega Genesis - when I was dead broke man I couldn't picture this

In reply to CRE
4/8/13

CRE:
Good for him. Who cares if he didn't "earn" it or "deserve" it in some traditional sense - he got it and that's all that matters. Bunch of cry babies whining about how it isn't fair.
I agree. I'd love to see some standard HBS nerd say sh-t to his face. Not going to happen.

Maternity is a matter of fact, paternity is a matter of opinion.

In reply to idragmazda
4/8/13

So working your ass off number crunching at an IB or for MBB somehow makes you a world class leader? This guy was great at what he set out to do (play football), that's pretty much all HBS asks.

His GMAT score is irrelevant considering his background. I don't think he will add some amazing amount of value to the class but plenty of others with pedestrian (work and academic) backgrounds are admitted every year to keep the class perspectives balanced.

In reply to guyfromct
4/8/13

futurectdoc:
Hbs also admitted dubya's personal assistant who didn't even have a bachelors. No one was up in arms.

Folks actually were up in arms about that guy, but no one knows his GMAT. For all we know he could have crushed it. Obviously, it's much more likely that the President simply made a phone call on his behalf, but there's no smoking gun out there quite like that 570...however if that guy had the benefit of both the president pulling strings and being the rumored 490 GMAT scorer HBS allegedly accepted, I'm certain that people would be calling for his head.

Connections and nepotism are part of the game, folks. Dubya at Yale and HBS, John Kerry at Yale, Al Gore at Harvard, etc...

I'm more impressed by what this guy has done at this point in his career then either of the jokers listed above.

On another note, how did Jason Wright not get into HBS?
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=106728782&...

740 GMAT? 33 MCAT?? NFLPA Rep?

4/8/13

"An unrestricted free agent in the 2009 offseason, Foxworth signed a four-year, $28 million contract with the Baltimore Ravens on February 27. The deal included $16.5 million guaranteed.[4][5]"

Pretty sure he's already more successful than 99% of HBS grads. And who cares - it's one spot in an already ridiculously large class size.

4/8/13

As he was previously the president of the NFLPA and also previsouly served on the exec committee, I wouldn't be surprised if he was interested in working as an NFL agent or in some other sports-related capacity. If so, his reason for getting an mba makes a lot of sense to adcoms. Much more sense than TFA/engineer/non-profit --> MBA --> IBD/PE. Based on his professional experience, he may not add a ton of value to finance/accounting classes, but I'm sure it'd be interesting to have him in an ethics/negotiations class. The stories would probably be facinating and non-traditional. I'd much, much rather hear about NFL lockout talks as opposed to some IT guy babble on about how he negotiated 10% net net savings by implementing xyz software, zzzzz.

Now, if he's trying to break into mgmt consulting or PE with a 570 gmat, that's another story...

4/8/13

Jason Wright is probably just a Chicago guy - don't assume he didn't get in there (he went northwestern for UG).

Also as a bschool student, I wouldn't give a shit if the guy had a low gmat but was the nflpa president, I think he would be a great classmate.

In reply to ke18sb
4/8/13

ke18sb:
Also as a bschool student, I wouldn't give a shit if the guy had a low gmat but was the nflpa president, I think he would be a great classmate.

Not to mention that he'd probably be cool to chill with. Get some good workout tips, go out on the weekends, etc. Not going to want to be doing that with a host of other people

In reply to prn927
4/8/13

prn927:
what a joke. lost a lot of respect for HBS. why even require work experience if playing in the NFL qualifies as work experience?

I'm sure they give a fck about your lost respect. You've gotta be joking too. Being a professional athlete makes him a great candidate for many of the same reasons that military vets are great candidates. People get side-tracked by many of the clowns and sideshows in professional sports but generally those guys are incredibly hard working, disciplined and extremely dedicated individuals who have put everything into their sport for most likely their entire life. Not every athlete had all of his homework done for him and the fact that this guy ran the NFLPA means he's not dumb ( in addition to being far better experience than any bullshit you do for your few years out of undergrad).

In reply to islandbanker
4/8/13

This Jason Wright feller - black, 740 GMAT, pre-med for undergrad at a good school, and a great + unique career. How could he not get into every school he applied for?

I therefore assume that he is attending Booth by choice.

4/8/13

yeah i would take him over someone with a 780.

Money Never Sleeps? More like Money Never SUCKS amirite?!?!?!?

In reply to mbavsmfin
4/8/13

mbavsmfin:
Eh, not that surprised he got in. The women on b-school adcoms get pretty excited by NFL players and athletes in general...

i'm sorry you're having trouble finding a girlfriend bro. let's not blame "NFL players and athletes in general" for our problems, ok?

Money Never Sleeps? More like Money Never SUCKS amirite?!?!?!?

In reply to juniormistmaker
4/8/13

juniormistmaker:
the fact that this guy ran the NFLPA means he's not dumb

Not to mention that in a greater sense, he played football for a couple years, made bank, and got out before his knees or his mind were ruined beyond repair.

HBS gets to say they take people with lower GMAT's (a benefit in their case because it "shows" they care more about other factors), have a former NFL player and labor exec as a student, and if he goes to the NFL office they can claim that too. Foxworth gets a Harvard degree. It's a win-win.

In reply to scleraxis
4/8/13

I'm going to speak very freely and candidly here and will probably end up disclosing more personal information than I should on an anonymous bulletin.

I am a black male with a fairly strong GPA and a 99th percentile GMAT. I am an alumnus of the SVMP program at HBS and aim to matriculate into the MBA program. Read about it here (http://www.hbs.edu/svmp/) if you are unfamiliar with it. After participating in so immersive a program (it literally mimics the MBA experience so fully, academically and socially), I would point out very frankly that what makes the classroom such a vibrant and engaging experience is the diversity of the voices represented.

Being brutally honest here, I hate affirmative action. Even as a URM who stands to benefit directly from it, I loathe it. I think it perpetuates the very problem it claims to solve. I refused to list my ethnicity on my college application; I think you should want me for the quantitative statistics I have earned, the extracurriculars you've seen me participate in, and the qualitative ability you can see I possess from the written material I share and the story I communicate. All that being said, HBS' approach to diversity is remarkably different from the norm. HBS gets it. It's about diversity of background and perspective. For SVMP at least, I don't know how they manage to do so stellar a job of getting smart, humble, genuine, accomplished people in the door when they have such limited information at their disposal via the written application. At least with the MBA process there's an in-person interview so I can understand they get a far better sense of who a candidate is.

Foxworthy does not need a GMAT score to get into HBS. HBS is a school that doesn't look to create leaders; it is one that looks to develop leaders. Foxworthy is clearly a leader. He has excelled as a college athlete (and withstood the pressures and temptations and all the pitfalls that experience includes by default), entered the premiere league for his sport, excelled among his peers there (both in physical performance and off the field as a leader), and gained unique experience in a small industry. Seriously, how many people can say they led a professional athletes' union, represented hundreds of players in collective bargaining negotiations (without any additional compensation for their work in that role), and lived in four of our nation's most prominent cities while doing all the above?

A GMAT score does not mean you are or are not a leader. A strong GMAT score means you have the determination, perseverance, or fortitude to endure the GMAT ordeal. I heard Dee Leopold say this verbatim. Granted, it probably indicates a good measure of innate intelligence as well, but raw intellectual horsepower and a strong work ethic do not automatically make one a leader. HBS does not use the GMAT as a means of admitting people. They use it as a way to reject people. An unusually high score does not help you in admissions as much as an unusually low one will hurt you. However, it is not the sole factor to determine your fate, nor the most prominent. I was lucky to crush it, but it is simply a function of how hard I prepared for it leading up to the exam date. I wanted to do well to compensate for the fact that I don't have a 3.85 in a soft subject, so I put in the effort for that GMAT number.

To circle back to my original point about the class composition, it is simply an inescapable fact that Foxworthy will be an immensely valuable addition to the class. From firsthand experience, I can state how amazing it is when you meet so many talented people, none of whom share too similar a background or story, yet where everyone is so full of ambition, of potential, and of vigor ... and can add to the discussion from the richness of their own experiences. I imagine he would bring that, and I imagine he demonstrated that in the admissions interview. Just as much as I'd value hearing the voice of the girl who spent two years at McKinsey before joining a sick biotech startup that got acquired by a F500 pharma when we encounter a healthcare case in TEM (The Entrepreneurial Manager, great class), or the guy who did GS TMT before KKR when he talks during BVI (Behavioral and Value Investing with Greenwood, also sick), I'd value hearing someone like Foxworthy talk during Negotiations or any of the leadership courses in the EC year.

Long story short, don't sandbag the guy because a single stat of his seems subpar to you. Realize that it truly is a holistic process, and this guy can offer a lot to the classroom that matters.

Most people do things to add days to their life. I do things to add life to my days.

Browse my blog as a WSO contributing author

4/8/13

I've counted two people who've blamed people's reactions to this on racism.... stop. just [email protected] stop

If your dreams don't scare you, then they are not big enough.

"There are two types of people in this world: People who say they pee in the shower, and dirty fucking liars."-Louis C.K.

4/8/13

I always feel bad for folks w/ low GMATs who get admitted to top 15 schools because their career options are limited. You'll get crucified trying to go into consulting w/ a 570 GMAT. Banks also want to know your GMAT. I doubt this guy, who's already very well off, would probably want to go through the hassle of an MBB or IB stint, lol. He'll probably get a cushy PE or hedge fund gig that will allow him to leverage his contacts appropriately.

I assume the schools understand this with lower end GMAT scorers and only let them in if they have atypical stories and atypical post MBA career plans (entrepreneurship, general management, non-profit, etc) or major league connections that will enable them to overcome recruiting pitfalls. He likely has both.

4/8/13

The guy's obviously a leader that fit squarely into HBS' recruiting profile. Plus since he has already earned a lot more both monetary and reputation-wise than many of his peers, his intention of getting a HBS MBA is arguably "purer" than a lot of the other candidates.

In reply to TheGrind
4/8/13

TheGrind:
I always feel bad for folks w/ low GMATs who get admitted to top 15 schools because their career options are limited. You'll get crucified trying to go into consulting w/ a 570 GMAT. Banks also want to know your GMAT.

...you do realize that there are other options post-MBA, right?

TheGrind:
He'll probably get a cushy PE or hedge fund gig that will allow him to leverage his contacts appropriately.

What? He probably won't do finance at all.

I can't tell if you're a troll or if you really think that's how the entire world works

In reply to APAE
4/8/13

APAE:
Foxworthy Foxworthy Foxworthy Foxworthy

You know we're talking the NFL player, not the redneck comedian, right?

4/8/13

I believe I mentioned some of those options.

right here, actually: "(entrepreneurship, general management, non-profit, etc)"

Thanks for playing

4/8/13

There is so much butt hurt in this thread it is actually making my head hurt.

patternfinder:

Of course, I would just buy in scales.

See my WSO Blog | my AMA

4/8/13
In reply to Angus Macgyver
4/8/13

Angus Macgyver:
This Jason Wright feller - black, 740 GMAT, pre-med for undergrad at a good school, and a great + unique career. How could he not get into every school he applied for?

I therefore assume that he is attending Booth by choice.

A friend of mine at Booth knows him well. From what i heard, he only applied to booth and kellogg because he wanted to stay in Chicago with his wife.

In reply to subrosa
4/8/13

subrosa:
This is ridiculous...... I don't care about his "leadership" background or whatever. A 570 has to be borderline retarded. Honestly, anyone else gets a 570 and they don't have a shot anywhere other than Tennessee Martin or some garbage. This is yet another example of the world gone mad. American business is becoming laughable with the likes of Jay Z and Puff Daddy being considered businessmen. Now we have to endure knuckleheads like this matriculating at our finest school. Of course everyone will cheer this, but come on it's truly absurd.

If I could be considered as laughable a businessman as Jay Z or Diddy, sign me up. They've goth built multi-hundred million dollar enterprises and are worth around $500M a piece. Jay Z didn't even finish high school, if I recall correctly. He had a talent that helped him accumulate capital and then he put it to work. Simple as that.

But, keep telling yourself that the only legitimate businessmen are people who crank on financial models and write Investment Considerations in CIMs if that makes you feel better.

To add - don't discount the absurd work ethic it takes to make the NFL and sustain a career in it. Not to mention the complexity of NFL offenses and defenses. On top of that, the dude was the President of the NFLPA.

Real life accomplishments > test scores

In reply to TheGrind
4/8/13

TheGrind:
I always feel bad for folks w/ low GMATs who get admitted to top 15 schools because their career options are limited. You'll get crucified trying to go into consulting w/ a 570 GMAT. Banks also want to know your GMAT. I doubt this guy, who's already very well off, would probably want to go through the hassle of an MBB or IB stint, lol. He'll probably get a cushy PE or hedge fund gig that will allow him to leverage his contacts appropriately.

I assume the schools understand this with lower end GMAT scorers and only let them in if they have atypical stories and atypical post MBA career plans (entrepreneurship, general management, non-profit, etc) or major league connections that will enable them to overcome recruiting pitfalls. He likely has both.

Woosh...

MM IB -> Corporate Development

In reply to sayandarula
4/8/13

sayandarula:
mbavsmfin:
Eh, not that surprised he got in. The women on b-school adcoms get pretty excited by NFL players and athletes in general...

i'm sorry you're having trouble finding a girlfriend bro. let's not blame "NFL players and athletes in general" for our problems, ok?

Hey bro. My girlfriend and I are doing fine, and I'm most likely heading to a top b-school this fall. I give props to domonique for his accomplishments. My main point was that adcom loves seeing unique backgrounds and extracurriculars.

4/8/13

Where is the Brady suicide watch livestream??? Pls link.

In reply to blastoise
4/8/13

blastoise:

Is he gay?

Maybe that's what his essay was about? Would have been one hell of an essay. Adcoms love it when it's just your basic "I'm gay and had to hide it for 18 years" essay for college; adding "I played in the NFL" to the mix takes it over the top.

Falcon:

I wouldn't be surprise if Myron Rolle (FSU Rhodes Scholar) takes a stab at business school in the near future.

To be fair, Rolle would probably hit higher than a 570 after prep classes.

4/8/13

Lol really screwed this one up

In reply to APAE
4/8/13

APAE:
I'm going to speak very freely and candidly here and will probably end up disclosing more personal information than I should on an anonymous bulletin.

I am a black male with a fairly strong GPA and a 99th percentile GMAT. I am an alumnus of the SVMP program at HBS and aim to matriculate into the MBA program. Read about it here (http://www.hbs.edu/svmp/) if you are unfamiliar with it. After participating in so immersive a program (it literally mimics the MBA experience so fully, academically and socially), I would point out very frankly that what makes the classroom such a vibrant and engaging experience is the diversity of the voices represented.

Being brutally honest here, I hate affirmative action. Even as a URM who stands to benefit directly from it, I loathe it. I think it perpetuates the very problem it claims to solve. I refused to list my ethnicity on my college application; I think you should want me for the quantitative statistics I have earned, the extracurriculars you've seen me participate in, and the qualitative ability you can see I possess from the written material I share and the story I communicate. All that being said, HBS' approach to diversity is remarkably different from the norm. HBS gets it. It's about diversity of background and perspective. For SVMP at least, I don't know how they manage to do so stellar a job of getting smart, humble, genuine, accomplished people in the door when they have such limited information at their disposal via the written application. At least with the MBA process there's an in-person interview so I can understand they get a far better sense of who a candidate is.

Foxworthy does not need a GMAT score to get into HBS. HBS is a school that doesn't look to create leaders; it is one that looks to develop leaders. Foxworthy is clearly a leader. He has excelled as a college athlete (and withstood the pressures and temptations and all the pitfalls that experience includes by default), entered the premiere league for his sport, excelled among his peers there (both in physical performance and off the field as a leader), and gained unique experience in a small industry. Seriously, how many people can say they led a professional athletes' union, represented hundreds of players in collective bargaining negotiations (without any additional compensation for their work in that role), and lived in four of our nation's most prominent cities while doing all the above?

A GMAT score does not mean you are or are not a leader. A strong GMAT score means you have the determination, perseverance, or fortitude to endure the GMAT ordeal. I heard Dee Leopold say this verbatim. Granted, it probably indicates a good measure of innate intelligence as well, but raw intellectual horsepower and a strong work ethic do not automatically make one a leader. HBS does not use the GMAT as a means of admitting people. They use it as a way to reject people. An unusually high score does not help you in admissions as much as an unusually low one will hurt you. However, it is not the sole factor to determine your fate, nor the most prominent. I was lucky to crush it, but it is simply a function of how hard I prepared for it leading up to the exam date. I wanted to do well to compensate for the fact that I don't have a 3.85 in a soft subject, so I put in the effort for that GMAT number.

To circle back to my original point about the class composition, it is simply an inescapable fact that Foxworthy will be an immensely valuable addition to the class. From firsthand experience, I can state how amazing it is when you meet so many talented people, none of whom share too similar a background or story, yet where everyone is so full of ambition, of potential, and of vigor ... and can add to the discussion from the richness of their own experiences. I imagine he would bring that, and I imagine he demonstrated that in the admissions interview. Just as much as I'd value hearing the voice of the girl who spent two years at McKinsey before joining a sick biotech startup that got acquired by a F500 pharma when we encounter a healthcare case in TEM (The Entrepreneurial Manager, great class), or the guy who did GS TMT before KKR when he talks during BVI (Behavioral and Value Investing with Greenwood, also sick), I'd value hearing someone like Foxworthy talk during Negotiations or any of the leadership courses in the EC year.

Long story short, don't sandbag the guy because a single stat of his seems subpar to you. Realize that it truly is a holistic process, and this guy can offer a lot to the classroom that matters.

Literally the ultimate answer. Might as well close down the thread.

4/8/13

LMAO at all the dumbasses on this thread who think

1) he sucks because he didn't come from BB/MBB + >700 + >3.8GPA
2) he's targeting the buyside after HBS

wallstreetoasis fosters some of the most ignorant, close-minded idiots around....and continues to get polluted every day by middle-schoolers starting clueless threads. i am so glad HBS took in foxworth and not you, because you're fuckin trash.

Since when was MBA an acronym for Institute of Investment Banking and Consulting?

4/8/13

I previously posted that this was a trash decision by HBS, but a lot of good points have changed my mind. I was only thinking of the finance and accounting oriented courses, and agree that he won't be of much value to these classes. However, he'll be a valuable asset to every other class. I think he'll also be a great benefit to a multitude of MBA extracurricular clubs and activities (including the intramural teams).

In reply to BanditPandit
4/8/13

BanditPandit:
LMAO at all the dumbasses on this thread who think

1) he sucks because he didn't come from BB/MBB + >700 + >3.8GPA
2) he's targeting the buyside after HBS

wallstreetoasis fosters some of the most ignorant, close-minded idiots around....and continues to get polluted every day by middle-schoolers starting clueless threads. i am so glad HBS took in foxworth and not you, because you're fuckin trash.

Since when was MBA an acronym for Institute of Investment Banking and Consulting?

Oh but they suggest general management as a potential exit opp too!

Lol people are morons

4/8/13

Bottom line: He's FAR from your "average" 570 scorer. If I were sitting around with a 570 contemplating test prep/admissions consultant services, this certainly wouldn't be the story that gives me any hope.

and as I stated before, anything around a 600 means you'll be able to handle the coursework. The value placed on a high gmat is overblown these days-unfortunately it gets used as both a weeding and measuring tool.

4/8/13

So..I was a division 1a football player who went on to do an M.A. and then MBA after my career ended.

I think for the most part the intelligent people on this board have already addressed why is credentials are more than qualified for the opportunity that he is getting, but I thought I would add my two cents.

HBS seems to be well known for taking the intriguing star as opposed to the run-of the mill overachiever. One friend who got into to HBS..with a low gmat..low this..low that, told me that he believes the difference is that they aren't looking for the next banker making 300k..but the next person on the cover of Times.

Foxworth is a man that negotiated at arms length with 32 of the most successful people in the world. This is a person who was chosen to represent the interest of an entire union of millionaire hot shots who have been the alpha male of every interaction in their life.

This is a man...that lived in a world that gave him every opportunity to not give a damn about furthering his education..yet after grossing over $30 mill (more than probably everyone in his HBS class) during his career...wanted to come back and do Harvard the favor of attending their school.

Yes..I say doing harvard the favor. He could have gone to several other schools..recieved a similar education...made great connects (though he I'm sure he has more connects than he needs) and come out to an executive job in the NFL or a host of other options.

Now on to being an athlete...Yes there's a host of knuckleheads..there's guys that don't give a damn about school and only care about themselves...But this is a man who has handled the pressure of the board room infront of 12 execs..and handles the pressure of performing infront of 60k on a regular basis. I know these guys make it look easy..but that's doesn't mean you could do it too.

Supply and demand...thousands of GS, Mck ect. people out there. Only and handful of guys with Dominque's credentials

In reply to BanditPandit
4/8/13

BanditPandit:
Since when was MBA an acronym for Institute of Investment Banking and Consulting?

MBA = Most Badass Analyst - or - Most Badass Associate - or - Mega Bain Alum

Didn't you know that?

"Durr...but how will he do PE if he can't build a financial model!"

People are so incredibly out of touch with reality and what doing business actually means, it's frightening.

In reply to TheKing
4/8/13

TheKing:
People are so incredibly out of touch with reality and what doing business actually means, it's frightening.

It makes me wonder if a lot of these people are just undergrads or highschoolers taking something they read on the forums as dogma and repeating it as many times as possible.

In reply to APAE
4/8/13

APAE:
I'm going to speak very freely and candidly here and will probably end up disclosing more personal information than I should on an anonymous bulletin.

I am a black male with a fairly strong GPA and a 99th percentile GMAT. I am an alumnus of the SVMP program at HBS and aim to matriculate into the MBA program. Read about it here (http://www.hbs.edu/svmp/) if you are unfamiliar with it. After participating in so immersive a program (it literally mimics the MBA experience so fully, academically and socially), I would point out very frankly that what makes the classroom such a vibrant and engaging experience is the diversity of the voices represented.

Being brutally honest here, I hate affirmative action. Even as a URM who stands to benefit directly from it, I loathe it. I think it perpetuates the very problem it claims to solve. I refused to list my ethnicity on my college application; I think you should want me for the quantitative statistics I have earned, the extracurriculars you've seen me participate in, and the qualitative ability you can see I possess from the written material I share and the story I communicate. All that being said, HBS' approach to diversity is remarkably different from the norm. HBS gets it. It's about diversity of background and perspective. For SVMP at least, I don't know how they manage to do so stellar a job of getting smart, humble, genuine, accomplished people in the door when they have such limited information at their disposal via the written application. At least with the MBA process there's an in-person interview so I can understand they get a far better sense of who a candidate is.

Foxworthy does not need a GMAT score to get into HBS. HBS is a school that doesn't look to create leaders; it is one that looks to develop leaders. Foxworthy is clearly a leader. He has excelled as a college athlete (and withstood the pressures and temptations and all the pitfalls that experience includes by default), entered the premiere league for his sport, excelled among his peers there (both in physical performance and off the field as a leader), and gained unique experience in a small industry. Seriously, how many people can say they led a professional athletes' union, represented hundreds of players in collective bargaining negotiations (without any additional compensation for their work in that role), and lived in four of our nation's most prominent cities while doing all the above?

A GMAT score does not mean you are or are not a leader. A strong GMAT score means you have the determination, perseverance, or fortitude to endure the GMAT ordeal. I heard Dee Leopold say this verbatim. Granted, it probably indicates a good measure of innate intelligence as well, but raw intellectual horsepower and a strong work ethic do not automatically make one a leader. HBS does not use the GMAT as a means of admitting people. They use it as a way to reject people. An unusually high score does not help you in admissions as much as an unusually low one will hurt you. However, it is not the sole factor to determine your fate, nor the most prominent. I was lucky to crush it, but it is simply a function of how hard I prepared for it leading up to the exam date. I wanted to do well to compensate for the fact that I don't have a 3.85 in a soft subject, so I put in the effort for that GMAT number.

To circle back to my original point about the class composition, it is simply an inescapable fact that Foxworthy will be an immensely valuable addition to the class. From firsthand experience, I can state how amazing it is when you meet so many talented people, none of whom share too similar a background or story, yet where everyone is so full of ambition, of potential, and of vigor ... and can add to the discussion from the richness of their own experiences. I imagine he would bring that, and I imagine he demonstrated that in the admissions interview. Just as much as I'd value hearing the voice of the girl who spent two years at McKinsey before joining a sick biotech startup that got acquired by a F500 pharma when we encounter a healthcare case in TEM (The Entrepreneurial Manager, great class), or the guy who did GS TMT before KKR when he talks during BVI (Behavioral and Value Investing with Greenwood, also sick), I'd value hearing someone like Foxworthy talk during Negotiations or any of the leadership courses in the EC year.

Long story short, don't sandbag the guy because a single stat of his seems subpar to you. Realize that it truly is a holistic process, and this guy can offer a lot to the classroom that matters.

And that's how SVMP represents right there. Hope you dropped a mic and walked away from the computer after you typed that bro.

In reply to SirTradesaLot
4/8/13

SirTradesaLot:
Angus Macgyver:
If I were a betting man, however, I would still wager that he's going to do better than the average HBS graduate in terms of post-graduation career trajectory.
Honestly, he could join PWM as a broker and absolutely rake it in just by getting players and former players as clients.

^^ This

Probably the least talked about and most lucrative exit op for retired pro athletes.

4/8/13

Damn some of you bros are jelly as fuuuuu. Good on him.

4/8/13

fuark brah, you mirin??

I don't want to be a product of the environment, i want the environment to be a product of me

4/8/13

Gonna add in another thought: the GMAT is really, really easy if you've spent your entire life (ages 5-22) cranking it out in the classroom and busting ass to get that perfect 4.0 and 2300+ on your SAT. You've spent your whole life studying.

If you're a former NFL player, you've spent the majority of your life outside the classroom on the football field. You never had the time in high school or college to sit down and study for 15 hours on end, or read the Iliad, or whatever. That's all time you need to spend in the gym, watching film, whatever. If you're busting ass to get good grades, with a few exceptions (maybe Andrew Luck), you're not gonna be a starter. It's a time commitment element.

So I'm just as impressed with a 570 from a former NFL player as I am with a 740 by a Harvard grad. I mean if you've gotten an Ivy education and your whole life has revolved around academics until you graduated from college, you SHOULD be doing better on the test than the former pro athlete.

In reply to BlackHat
4/8/13

BlackHat:
Foxworth4MVP?

I chortled. This deserves a silver banana, but I'm a cheapskate.

"There is only one way to avoid criticism: do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing"

In reply to thatguy12345
4/8/13

thatguy12345:
This is a person who was chosen to represent the interest of an entire union of millionaire hot shots who have been the alpha male of every interaction in their life.

I was also a collegiate football player and believe this point cannot be overstated and shows a great deal more about his abilities than any standardized test possibly could.

There is a huge difference between the type A personalities you see in finance and those you see in football, particularly the NFL. Being able to lead and be respected by a large group of those men is something that is much more valuable than any test score.

patternfinder:

Of course, I would just buy in scales.

See my WSO Blog | my AMA

In reply to triplectz
4/8/13

Wall St Oasis is where nerds with minimal social skills and emotional intelligence get a voice... I usually just lurk and chuckle at the ridiculous things people say on here.... They're actually questioning the former union rep of the NFL PA who has actually been one of the best in the world at SOMETHING... and negotiated with billionaires... based on his GMAT score???.... ignorant...

In reply to triplectz
4/8/13

triplectz:

So I'm just as impressed with a 570 from a former NFL player as I am with a 740 by a Harvard grad. I mean if you've gotten an Ivy education and your whole life has revolved around academics until you graduated from college, you SHOULD be doing better on the test than the former pro athlete.

Do you actually think that attending a fancy college significantly affects a person's IQ?

Also, all of you nerds complaining about giving Foxworth a slot are out of your minds. He is without a doubt one of the most impressive guys HBS has managed to pull down in the last ten years.

4/8/13

This thread made me:

1) disappointed that a lot of people have defined their self-worth (and thus seek to define others' self-worth) by a test score. I hope life treats you more gently than you treated Dominique in your assessments, and does not brutally disappoint you.

2) relieved, happy, honored to be at HBS with Dominique, and to be part of the HBS community with a few of the posters here. Thank you for countering the polemics of narrow-mindedness with class.

In reply to BTbanker
4/8/13

BTbanker:
Let's take a moment and reflect on Brady's (probably subrosa) suicidal thoughts right now.

That was my first thought. LOL.

Regards

"The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
- Ronald Reagan

4/8/13

Can one of the middleschoolers or kindy gardeners make a thread that schools us on the definition of "acronym". I'm not sure if all of us are quite there yet.

4/8/13

I wonder if this guy would do well on the HBS intramural flag football team or not?

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