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Hi guys,

So, I hate consulting. Hours are too long, bullshit piled too deep, travel exhausting. I'm far from home and miserable, so I've decided to quit.

How much notice do I need to give them? Is the standard 2 weeks enough, or do I need more?

By mid-August I'll have been in my entry-level BA role for one full year. I'd like to not work an additional day past it. Anyone have experience in this? Thanks.

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Comments (64)

  • petergibbons's picture

    Probably depends on the firm, your case, and how much support you want from the firm in finding your next job. How much longer is your case, and what is your firm's policy in terms of using career resources?

    Life, liberty and the pursuit of Starwood Points

  • persimmon's picture

    I'm wrapping up my case this week. Pipeline is dry, so I imagine the next few months working on proposals and internal IP only. I don't know about my firm's policy in terms of using career resources. I actually don't really care. I want to quit, and I want to give them enough notice. Trying to figure out when is the best time, and to whom I should speak.

  • Texas Tea's picture

    Seems like the longer you give them the more pleasant it will be.

  • In reply to Texas Tea
    persimmon's picture

    ccrosb:
    Seems like the longer you give them the more pleasant it will be.

    But if I'm like, "hey guys, I'm quitting in 2.5 months," won't they just fire me now?

  • Ovechkin08's picture

    Do not quit without a plan B, however much you hate it, its experience and a paycheck in a terrible economy. Start looking for something else now and use your time on the bench to get an idea of what's available. The relief of quitting will wear off once you realise you have to start explaining to interviewers why you quit and dealing with people thinking you could't hack it in the corporate world.

  • petergibbons's picture

    If your case is done, and your priority is just getting out, 2 weeks notice is fine, and if your case is ending now, do it before they can staff you again. Worst case is if you try to give them 2 weeks and they tell you to stay for longer, then you just make a call.

    The only reason I could think of to milk it is that if you're not going to be staffed for awhile, that takes care of most of your complaints...you won't be traveling, probably not working as hard.

    I would talk to your career advisor, your staffer, and HR, in that order. There's a pretty set chain of events once you initiate the process.

    Life, liberty and the pursuit of Starwood Points

  • persimmon's picture

    I have a plan B already. I'm going to do a post-bac pre-med and then go to medical school, but first I'm moving to India to study yoga and vedic philosophy for 6 months. I'm not kidding or trolling. Consulting / business isn't for me, so I just want to leave in a way that makes sense for everyone, mostly me.

  • In reply to petergibbons
    persimmon's picture

    petergibbons:

    The only reason I could think of to milk it is that if you're not going to be staffed for awhile, that takes care of most of your complaints...you won't be traveling, probably not working as hard.

    Thanks for your reply. I do want to stick it out until I reach the 1 year point. I have taken strategic vacations :) in 3 weeks, I am gone for 10 days, so they're not going to staff me, and upon returning, I take another vacation almost exactly a month after that, for a week, so they might not staff me, and then I'm almost at 1 year.

  • In reply to persimmon
    Texas Tea's picture

    persimmon:
    ccrosb:
    Seems like the longer you give them the more pleasant it will be.

    But if I'm like, "hey guys, I'm quitting in 2.5 months," won't they just fire me now?

    Well yeah, you have to be tactful in how you present it. Give them a good reason, and make sure they know you're going to give them your best until you leave. For instance, I have a friend who left the Big 4 to go to law school. He hated the work but really was going to school. I just know that he presented this two them more than two months out, and everything went smoothly.

  • BTbanker's picture

    I'm curious, what do you plan on moving on to in the future? Obviously banking and trading wouldn't suit you either.

  • melvvvar's picture

    2 weeks is fine. people ditch all the time. say hi to yogaoasis.com

  • NewGuy's picture

    Check your contract. It will state the terms for leaving including notice period

  • In reply to Texas Tea
    melvvvar's picture

    ccrosb:
    Seems like the longer you give them the more pleasant it will be.

    this is nonsense. please stop commenting, and i mean on anything.

    once you give notice, several things happen:

    1. you are no longer allowed to take PTO
    2. your life will be filled to the brim with administrative bullshit and shit tons of scut work will fall on you

    two weeks is considered the courtesy amount. and since you may need at least one rec from them for your med school adcom, you better leave on good fucking terms, as in, yeah, helping coca cola sell more sugar water in abu dhabi is nice, but i want to help heal the sick, blah blah blah.

  • In reply to persimmon
    petergibbons's picture

    persimmon:
    And don't some firms give you time to find a new job? Like 2 months paid or something?

    Yes, but not if you have a plan to do something else (e.g. study yoga in India). Seems like the risk/reward for lying isn't worth it.

    Life, liberty and the pursuit of Starwood Points

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  • guyfromct's picture

    FWIW the grass isn't greener on the other side, the hours are worse in medicine, 3rd and 4th year are about 80 a week and mostly on your feet, the cost is high 200k, residency pay is poor 45k for 80 hours a week. As a primary care physician you'll make about what you made as a BA start around 90-110k peak at 150, maybe 200. If you get into the right specialty or subspecialty you can make good money vitreoretinal averages about 800 or 900k and good guys in the top quarter are broaching 1.25mm same numbers for neurosurg. The work is repetitive, the pathology is often the same hypertension, diabetes mellitus, COPD. Patients suck and are litigious, odds are you will be sued at least one time, in OB/GYN you may be sued a lot more than that. That's not to say there aren't good parts, my father is an ophthalmologist, after a vitrectomy when a patient has gone from hand motion (being able to notice something moved, not what it is, how big etc) to 20/60 or 20/40 where they can read, drive and function they are incredibly grateful.

  • couchy's picture

    Plus in medicine you make a lot of money through accounting fraud, making insurance companies pay more than the real bill.

    When was the last time you looked at the price of medical care before you. Bought it.

  • In reply to couchy
    guyfromct's picture

    couchy:
    Plus in medicine you make a lot of money through accounting fraud, making insurance companies pay more than the real bill.

    When was the last time you looked at the price of medical care before you. Bought it.

    What are you smoking? Insurance companies don't want to pay what they owe, do you honestly think that they would allow for widespread "accounting fraud" anyway it would be billing fraud genius.

  • In reply to guyfromct
    persimmon's picture

    futurectdoc:
    FWIW the grass isn't greener on the other side, the hours are worse in medicine, 3rd and 4th year are about 80 a week and mostly on your feet, the cost is high 200k, residency pay is poor 45k for 80 hours a week. As a primary care physician you'll make about what you made as a BA start around 90-110k peak at 150, maybe 200. If you get into the right specialty or subspecialty you can make good money vitreoretinal averages about 800 or 900k and good guys in the top quarter are broaching 1.25mm same numbers for neurosurg. The work is repetitive, the pathology is often the same hypertension, diabetes mellitus, COPD. Patients suck and are litigious, odds are you will be sued at least one time, in OB/GYN you may be sued a lot more than that. That's not to say there aren't good parts, my father is an ophthalmologist, after a vitrectomy when a patient has gone from hand motion (being able to notice something moved, not what it is, how big etc) to 20/60 or 20/40 where they can read, drive and function they are incredibly grateful.

    thanks for your input. don't really care about the money. i want to dedicate half a year to MSF, the other half to a private practice. the money will be definitely sufficient to live a good life, and the work will be way more rewarding than putting these decks together.

  • In reply to persimmon
    guyfromct's picture

    persimmon:
    futurectdoc:
    FWIW the grass isn't greener on the other side, the hours are worse in medicine, 3rd and 4th year are about 80 a week and mostly on your feet, the cost is high 200k, residency pay is poor 45k for 80 hours a week. As a primary care physician you'll make about what you made as a BA start around 90-110k peak at 150, maybe 200. If you get into the right specialty or subspecialty you can make good money vitreoretinal averages about 800 or 900k and good guys in the top quarter are broaching 1.25mm same numbers for neurosurg. The work is repetitive, the pathology is often the same hypertension, diabetes mellitus, COPD. Patients suck and are litigious, odds are you will be sued at least one time, in OB/GYN you may be sued a lot more than that. That's not to say there aren't good parts, my father is an ophthalmologist, after a vitrectomy when a patient has gone from hand motion (being able to notice something moved, not what it is, how big etc) to 20/60 or 20/40 where they can read, drive and function they are incredibly grateful.

    thanks for your input. don't really care about the money. i want to dedicate half a year to MSF, the other half to a private practice. the money will be definitely sufficient to live a good life, and the work will be way more rewarding than putting these decks together.

    I'm not so sure it's really that rewarding especially when a lot of the illness is self inflicted, how excited is it treat the 350 lb diabetic, who refuses to lose weight, manage their sugar or stop smoking. How about the person who shows up with gonorrhea for the fifth time in as many months and refuses to use a condom because it doesn't feel as good. How about managing the overweight smoker for hypertension. That's the reality of medicine, managing the idiocy of patients.

  • In reply to couchy
    BTbanker's picture

    couchy:
    Plus in medicine you make a lot of money through accounting fraud, making insurance companies pay more than the real bill.

    When was the last time you looked at the price of medical care before you. Bought it.


    Haha. That was on one of an American Greed episodes.
  • In reply to BTbanker
    couchy's picture

    Connor:
    couchy:
    Plus in medicine you make a lot of money through accounting fraud, making insurance companies pay more than the real bill.

    When was the last time you looked at the price of medical care before you. Bought it.


    Haha. That was on one of an American Greed episodes.

    Cool, will look it up.

  • In reply to guyfromct
    ventjock's picture

    futurectdoc:

    I'm not so sure it's really that rewarding especially when a lot of the illness is self inflicted, how excited is it treat the 350 lb diabetic, who refuses to lose weight, manage their sugar or stop smoking. How about the person who shows up with gonorrhea for the fifth time in as many months and refuses to use a condom because it doesn't feel as good. How about managing the overweight smoker for hypertension. That's the reality of medicine, managing the idiocy of patients.

    This.

    Medicine is ugly. Use your 6 months to work in an inner city ER as an aide and make sure to work some night and weekend shifts to get a better picture of the reality of medicine.

    How would I describe myself? Three words: hard working, alpha male, jackhammer...merciless...insatiable.

  • F. Ro Jo's picture

    this has been on my mind recently too.... what do the folks who transition to PE or industry normally do?

  • YE777's picture

    wow, just wow...
    quitting MBB for medical school?
    medical school is long and expensive. waste of time and what makes you think that doctors have better work life balance?

  • signposts's picture

    Since I recently quit an MBB job, here are my 2 cents:

    1) Not sure if this is true across all firms, but the "transition" continuation of pay and benefits at BCG is available so long as you leave on mutually agreeable terms and you do not have a signed offer. This includes if you take up volunteer work or travel as a vacation - I'm not 100% sure about school as I have not personally encountered that case.

    2) Leaving on mutually agreeable terms involves a bit of give and take in terms of giving notice. If the staffing pipeline is dry, the *earliest* you will get dropped off payroll (to my understanding) is 2 weeks after your announcement. This was my situation as I left with a signed offer and had no desire to lie about it. Others have encountered cases where they will bargain with you (stay for one more case, stay for an extension of your current case so you can hand it off to a peer sufficiently that the client is comfortable, etc.) - if you are not planning on taking transition, you have more leverage in this bargaining. Otherwise, the employment agreement certainly does not make transition pay and benefits an obligation.

    3) If there is anybody at the firm you would prefer to deal with (whether it's an HR rep for your office, a staffing coordinator, or a mentor at a more senior level), you can often raise the issue with them. At the very least, they will have prior experience with people leaving and should be able to offer you some guidance. In my case, I worked with our staffing coordinator so that she knew my drop dead last day long before the partners in my office did (as I could not commit to a case beyond a certain length but didn't want to leave early or lose all leverage in terms of getting staffed on good cases). Of course, in other offices, I have heard of HR associates notifying the entire partner group of the office, so it comes down to your intuition/comfort level/relationships.

    Good luck with med school. I also considered it and, while it wasn't for me, I can agree that consulting was certainly not the promised land either.

  • In reply to persimmon
    guyfromct's picture

    persimmon:
    futurectdoc:
    FWIW the grass isn't greener on the other side, the hours are worse in medicine, 3rd and 4th year are about 80 a week and mostly on your feet, the cost is high 200k, residency pay is poor 45k for 80 hours a week. As a primary care physician you'll make about what you made as a BA start around 90-110k peak at 150, maybe 200. If you get into the right specialty or subspecialty you can make good money vitreoretinal averages about 800 or 900k and good guys in the top quarter are broaching 1.25mm same numbers for neurosurg. The work is repetitive, the pathology is often the same hypertension, diabetes mellitus, COPD. Patients suck and are litigious, odds are you will be sued at least one time, in OB/GYN you may be sued a lot more than that. That's not to say there aren't good parts, my father is an ophthalmologist, after a vitrectomy when a patient has gone from hand motion (being able to notice something moved, not what it is, how big etc) to 20/60 or 20/40 where they can read, drive and function they are incredibly grateful.

    thanks for your input. don't really care about the money. i want to dedicate half a year to MSF, the other half to a private practice. the money will be definitely sufficient to live a good life, and the work will be way more rewarding than putting these decks together.

    I just wanted to add this you can't spend half a year with doctors without borders then go back to your private practice, it's called continuity of care, if your doctor said I'll be unreachable for 6 months at a time, that would probably when you ask for your charts. The money doesn't come easily, if you want to live a "good life" then you are going to be actively managing your practice. Running a small practice isn't 9-5, running a successful one resembles IB hours. Here is a day in the life for my father I feel it's illustrative of what practicing medicine is like and he is lucky, my mother runs all the business side and he sees patients, if you don't have someone doing that it's your job to be HR, Finance, Management all rolled into one.

    Weekday Office
    7:30: Get to the office, catch up on charts a little, read a little JAMA, Archives etc. look at the schedule.
    8:00-12:00: AM Patients, a specialist will realistically see anywhere from 4 to 8 patients an hour you'll take histories, order tests/scripts/surgeries, do minor procedures.
    12:00-1:00: Nominally lunch, in reality more minor procedures maybe 5-10 minutes to have a quick bite to eat.
    1:00-6:00: PM patients same as the morning, you'll finish with the last one somewhere between 5:30 and 6:00.
    6:00-8:30: Charts, EMR is a pain to initiate new patients in, but you have to do this and stay up to date on charts.

    Weekday Surgery:
    6:30: Get to the ASC, grab a coffee, get changed into scrubs.
    7:00-4:00: Cases, will be a mix of vitrectomies, cataracts, glaucoma cases.
    4:00-7:00: Emergency office visits, charts and administrative tasks.

    Saturdays are either seen patients (two times a month) or doing charts, depending on the physician Sundays will either be off or a few hours of charts. So figure a good 70+ hours a week plus call. If you're solo or in a small group, you'll be on call more with fewer cases in a given call period, in a bigger group you'll be on call less often but you will be slammed, plus hospital call, which is separate from your practice's and means you are covering the ER, plus in patient consults. Consults tend to be prolonged affairs, you don't have your staff screening, hospitals are disorganized etc. so what could be 10 minutes in office can take 3 or 4 times as long and they are often self-insured (a euphemism for they aren't paying).

  • persimmon's picture

    I'm not totally set on being a doctor. I do know, however, that I need to get out of this country ASAP, and that I'm willing to forfeit any benefits of finishing a 2-3 year stint to make it happen.

    Signposts, thank you very much for your experience here. Cheers.

  • In reply to ventjock
    acronym's picture

    ventjock:
    futurectdoc:

    I'm not so sure it's really that rewarding especially when a lot of the illness is self inflicted, how excited is it treat the 350 lb diabetic, who refuses to lose weight, manage their sugar or stop smoking. How about the person who shows up with gonorrhea for the fifth time in as many months and refuses to use a condom because it doesn't feel as good. How about managing the overweight smoker for hypertension. That's the reality of medicine, managing the idiocy of patients.

    This.

    Medicine is ugly. Use your 6 months to work in an inner city ER as an aide and make sure to work some night and weekend shifts to get a better picture of the reality of medicine.

    +1 theoretical SB

    "'In summary, people are morons and who cares. Make a shit ton of money. I've never seen a Ferrari paid for by what people think.' - ANT" -rufiolove

  • In reply to ventjock
    acronym's picture

    ventjock:
    futurectdoc:

    I'm not so sure it's really that rewarding especially when a lot of the illness is self inflicted, how excited is it treat the 350 lb diabetic, who refuses to lose weight, manage their sugar or stop smoking. How about the person who shows up with gonorrhea for the fifth time in as many months and refuses to use a condom because it doesn't feel as good. How about managing the overweight smoker for hypertension. That's the reality of medicine, managing the idiocy of patients.

    This.

    Medicine is ugly. Use your 6 months to work in an inner city ER as an aide and make sure to work some night and weekend shifts to get a better picture of the reality of medicine.

    +1 theoretical SB

    "'In summary, people are morons and who cares. Make a shit ton of money. I've never seen a Ferrari paid for by what people think.' - ANT" -rufiolove

  • TopDGO's picture

    Ahh, only on WSO can you ask a question and then have people ignore it to bash your plans for the future that you shared as a side note. We are a great community.

    I quit from a mid-tier to take another job. My advice would be:

    -Read the HR policies so you can maneuver the legal stuff. I assure you that your boss doesn't know the policies, and there's a great chance most of the HR people won't know them either (seriously).

    -Then go talk to your boss. You want to leave on good terms, but at this point, you know what the HR policies say. So play nice but don't bend over backward for someone you don't like anyways. For instance, if they ask you to stay a month instead of two weeks for good reason, you can probably suck it up. But if they ask you to work 80 hour weeks for the next two months, you have to be polite as possible in telling them to STFU. In my personal experience, my boss asked me to stay until the end of the next month (I was quitting mid-month), but I convinced them that I could easily transition in 2 weeks (and they got the picture...I was leaving for a reason.)

    Best of luck in your next endeavors. Sounds like you have some interesting stuff to tackle. MBB will always be here in case medicine isn't for you.

  • In reply to TopDGO
    persimmon's picture

    TopDGO:

    I quit from a mid-tier to take another job. My advice would be:

    -Read the HR policies so you can maneuver the legal stuff. I assure you that your boss doesn't know the policies, and there's a great chance most of the HR people won't know them either (seriously).

    -Then go talk to your boss. You want to leave on good terms, but at this point, you know what the HR policies say. So play nice but don't bend over backward for someone you don't like anyways.

    Thanks a lot for your advice, and for responding to my original questions.

    I got a copy of my contract last week. They ask for one month's notice. So, on my 11 month anniversary, I am going to put my 1 month's notice in. At this point, I will have "paid off" or earned my sign-on bonus, and will have earned the housing allowance they gave me (weird international office thing).

    Then, on to bigger and better things!

    Cheers

  • In reply to persimmon
    acronym's picture

    persimmon:
    TopDGO:

    I quit from a mid-tier to take another job. My advice would be:

    -Read the HR policies so you can maneuver the legal stuff. I assure you that your boss doesn't know the policies, and there's a great chance most of the HR people won't know them either (seriously).

    -Then go talk to your boss. You want to leave on good terms, but at this point, you know what the HR policies say. So play nice but don't bend over backward for someone you don't like anyways.

    Thanks a lot for your advice, and for responding to my original questions.

    I got a copy of my contract last week. They ask for one month's notice. So, on my 11 month anniversary, I am going to put my 1 month's notice in. At this point, I will have "paid off" or earned my sign-on bonus, and will have earned the housing allowance they gave me (weird international office thing).

    Then, on to bigger and better things!

    Cheers

    Best of luck in your wacky-ass adventures, man.

    "'In summary, people are morons and who cares. Make a shit ton of money. I've never seen a Ferrari paid for by what people think.' - ANT" -rufiolove

  • In reply to petergibbons
    charlie 09's picture

    petergibbons:
    persimmon:
    And don't some firms give you time to find a new job? Like 2 months paid or something?

    Yes, but not if you have a plan to do something else (e.g. study yoga in India). Seems like the risk/reward for lying isn't worth it.

    Right - if you already have something lined up, you don't get the search time. It also typically doesn't apply at the pre-MBA (e.g., BA) level - check your contract to see if you get the benefit, it will be stated. If you do get it, it's based on tenure, so one year probably isn't buying you 2 months.

    Also, FYI - in case you consider staying or for anyone else reading this thread - using vacation time to make yourself structurally unstaffable (e.g., taking a vacation 3 weeks after your project ends, then another vacation 4 weeks after that) is easy to spot and generally considered a dick-move. Your staffer will know (and remember).

  • DotCarter's picture

    Don't even quit. Just go to India now, sparingly respond to some emails, and keep getting the paycheck until they noticed that you are useless and fire you.

  • In reply to DotCarter
    persimmon's picture

    DotCarter:
    Don't even quit. Just go to India now, sparingly respond to some emails, and keep getting the paycheck until they noticed that you are useless and fire you.

    Ha, that could be fun but I really don't want to get fired. I want to leave on as good of terms as possible so I can have a reference for applying to my next jobs.

  • F. Ro Jo's picture

    persimmon. you are my idol. i keep thinking about pulling the trigger, but every two weeks i get a reminder why i shouldnt.

  • In reply to F. Ro Jo
    persimmon's picture

    F. Ro Jo:
    persimmon. you are my idol. i keep thinking about pulling the trigger, but every two weeks i get a reminder why i shouldnt.

    i don't get it... do you get paid every two weeks? we get paid monthly here.

  • F. Ro Jo's picture

    yes sir. where is 'here?'

  • persimmon's picture

    "here" is in the EMEA category

  • F. Ro Jo's picture

    how's life pers? what are you up to these days.

  • In reply to F. Ro Jo
    persimmon's picture

    F. Ro Jo:
    how's life pers? what are you up to these days.

    Great. I spoke to a very senior member of the firm in the LGBT network about

    -my relationship (he's in SF, I'm in this frontier office)
    -my passions (I'm not thrilled by consulting)
    -my next steps

    and he thinks it's great I want to prioritize other things over this job. I'll be putting in my notice at 11 months and a few days of service at this office, will keep him as a reference, and will move on to something better. Started sending my resume out yesterday.

    I hate this country and this work here, and this mentor of mine told me it's not worth being miserable AND apart from my partner. Life's too short.

    My company asks for a one month notice, which is why I'll put in my resignation at 11 months and a few days -- just to ensure I complete my one full year for my resume and get my severance package (only available to those who have completed an entire year).

    The hardest part about MBB is getting in. If this isn't a career for you, the best part about working at MBB is putting it on your resume, which I get to do. Working here 2 or 3 years would look better, but even just one year looks damn good.

    I have spoken to folks at startups and tech companies in SF and they said it's seen as admirable if people jump the standard, traditional, conservative consulting ship to do something more interesting. I'm not afraid, I'll get hired to do something.

  • In reply to F. Ro Jo
    persimmon's picture

    F. Ro Jo:
    how's life pers? what are you up to these days.

    Great. I spoke to a very senior member of the firm in the LGBT network about

    -my relationship (he's in SF, I'm in this frontier office)
    -my passions (I'm not thrilled by consulting)
    -my next steps

    and he thinks it's great I want to prioritize other things over this job. I'll be putting in my notice at 11 months and a few days of service at this office, will keep him as a reference, and will move on to something better. Started sending my resume out yesterday.

    I hate this country and this work here, and this mentor of mine told me it's not worth being miserable AND apart from my partner. Life's too short.

    My company asks for a one month notice, which is why I'll put in my resignation at 11 months and a few days -- just to ensure I complete my one full year for my resume and get my severance package (only available to those who have completed an entire year).

    The hardest part about MBB is getting in. If this isn't a career for you, the best part about working at MBB is putting it on your resume, which I get to do. Working here 2 or 3 years would look better, but even just one year looks damn good.

    I have spoken to folks at startups and tech companies in SF and they said it's seen as admirable if people jump the standard, traditional, conservative consulting ship to do something more interesting. I'm not afraid, I'll get hired to do something.

  • F. Ro Jo's picture

    you get a severance for quitting??????

  • In reply to F. Ro Jo
    persimmon's picture

    F. Ro Jo:
    you get a severance for quitting??????

    maybe it's not really severance. it's in lieu of a 401K contribution since we don't get those here. regardless, it's cash in my pocket.
  • persimmon's picture

    Yesterday my staffing manager approached me with an opportunity that would last through October. I panicked -- I want to leave by end of August, but I didn't want to let them know of my intentions to leave until 1 month before my year so I can pay back my housing loan and get my end of service cash money.

    But I didn't want to screw the case team over, so I told my staffing manager yesterday that I would love to join the case, but I'm leaving by the beginning of September.

    He appreciated me being straightforward with him. He sent an email off to the staffing partners, to the HR team, and to the head of the office informing them of my resignation.

    I've already spoken with two of them, and they said they'd be happy to be references, and would like to help me however they can in getting a new job. Crazy. If I were a partner, I'd probably be pissed at me.

    I think they're going to let me work until the end of my year. Put me on some more CD or some shit.

    I'M FREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

  • In reply to persimmon
    IBTeaching's picture

    persimmon:
    Yesterday my staffing manager approached me with an opportunity that would last through October. I panicked -- I want to leave by end of August, but I didn't want to let them know of my intentions to leave until 1 month before my year so I can pay back my housing loan and get my end of service cash money.

    But I didn't want to screw the case team over, so I told my staffing manager yesterday that I would love to join the case, but I'm leaving by the beginning of September.

    He appreciated me being straightforward with him. He sent an email off to the staffing partners, to the HR team, and to the head of the office informing them of my resignation.

    I've already spoken with two of them, and they said they'd be happy to be references, and would like to help me however they can in getting a new job. Crazy. If I were a partner, I'd probably be pissed at me.

    I think they're going to let me work until the end of my year. Put me on some more CD or some shit.

    I'M FREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    Happy to hear it's working out for you bro. Sounds like BCG though lol.

  • persimmon's picture

    They're even giving me a pro-rated bonus. MBB really wants you to be happy when you leave.

  • persimmon's picture

    Keeeeeeep trying, I will neither confirm nor deny that I work for Bain. I mean BCG. Shit. Okay, McKinsey.

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