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In a nutshell, I recently finished my masters from a major target in the UK. I tried really hard for recruiting this year and had a few BB interviews but the markets being the way they are in London, wasn't lucky enough to land a job. Needless to say, it's been a horrible few months for me.

So I'm wondering, now what?

I do have good credentials (competitive degree, good grades, BB internship, high GMAT score, extracurriculars ). I thrive on that kind of competitive environment and do not want to settle for an average 9-5 job. What are some of the things I can do to stay in the game? There is really nothing left with the banks since it is off-season.

To prevent having a huge gap on my resume and to somewhat beef it up, I've thought about:

1) taking a post-graduate programming certificate (Java, Matlab, C#) which may boost my competitiveness in Sales and Trading and Research. The added bonus is that I may be looked at more like a recent graduate because of the additional education.
2) I'm also thinking about doing some academic financial research for a professor
3) CFA
4) Take a random back-office job (I'm afraid this will actually hurt my resume)
5) cold email funds for an unpaid internship (I know this is likely the best option, but stil need something to fill up my resume until I can land one)

Out of these options, what is the best way me to position myself for full time recruiting next year? I'm not so picky anymore about the exact job function anymore , but I know I want a challenging high-pressure high-reward job: I am looking at everything from S&T, IBD, Research, ECM/DCM, IM and Consulting (MBB).

Sorry for the lengthy post- I would really appreciate any advice !

1

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Comments (112)

  • George Parr's picture

    I would recommend to do number 3 (aim to get Level II by December) and number 5. In addition, expand the funds to prop firms.

    Wait and see what happens... number 1 could be an option but that starts in the fall...

  • Flake's picture

    You can come work under me.

    Under my tutelage, you will grow from boys to men. From men into gladiators. And from gladiators into SWANSONS.

  • BankorBust's picture

    Ouch... I would have applied to some backups in MO or something just in case. Really consider it cause beggars cant be choosers

  • makeyourownluck's picture

    Not to bust your balls but given the # of areas you have been considering have you ever thought that maybe you came off as not having any idea what you want to do to recruiters? ---- Short story is a recruiter at a top MM told me after I didn't get an offer the reason I was ding'd was because they were not sure I wanted to be in banking as opposed to S&T, at the time they were correct as I had no clue what I wanted, when I stepped back and read into what each career entails, I decided IB was right for me.....there are a lot of boutiques out there looking for candidates at this time of year, have your considered sacrificing some pay just to get your foot in the door? After a year im sure if you network and have all the credentials outlined you'd be able to transfer into a larger shop.

    its one way or the other: hate me or admire.

  • heister's picture

    Use your ASSets if you have any.

    Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

    Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

  • ron paul revolution's picture

    3) definitely do this, especially if you have nothing else on your plate. Level 1 is not difficult if you studied finance in undergrad

    4) there are "random back office jobs" and there are back office jobs that offer decent opportunities for someone in your position. I wouldn't rule this option out just because of a general stereotype.

    if all else fails, go be a navy seal. that can't hurt your resume.

  • CSTrader's picture

    Id say go for the CFA probably the most relevant and will help you out the most. However, not sure how the UK views the CFA.

  • In reply to ron paul revolution
    Revolution's picture

    ron paul revolution:
    3) definitely do this, especially if you have nothing else on your plate. Level 1 is not difficult if you studied finance in undergrad

    4) there are "random back office jobs" and there are back office jobs that offer decent opportunities for someone in your position. I wouldn't rule this option out just because of a general stereotype.

    if all else fails, go be a navy seal. that can't hurt your resume.

    Change your name immediately.

    Don't do L1 its a waste of time. Especially in this environment its what everyone is turning to in order to make themselves more marketable while not realizing that that time is better spent networking, chasing down leads, and practicing your non-regional diction

  • seabird's picture

    First thing, delete the other thread about your having an offer.
    http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/leveraging-a...

    Just saying. Next though, go do an internship while you keep looking. And get ready for the pain.

    "...all truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

    - Schopenhauer

  • rothyman's picture

    Back Office Job = better than no job.

    Plus it opens you up to networking to guys in FO.

    If you're really that insecure about having it on your resume then just leave it off. At least you're getting paid and you have an opportunity to meet people.

  • miss-chief's picture

    Thanks for all the advice.

    seabird, I don't intend to take that offer because I realized it's really different from what I want to do and not relevant at all. I don't understand what you are implying by saying that I should delete the post ?

    In terms of MO roles, it was my mistake to not apply to any but at the time of recruitment I thought I had a great shot at FO, only finding out after I had already applied that many of the BBs weren't even hiring this year. Because they only let you do one application per year, this also shut me out of the MO applications.

    I took extra care to make sure that all my applications to the different areas were tailored and read like I really wanted the role, so I dont think lack of focus was the issue... It simply boiled down to the fact a lot of BBs were hiring 0-5 analysts (not even exaggerating here) - I lost one of the jobs to an experienced hire and another one did not progress past first round after the headcount was lost for the position. I didn't apply to consulting this year, but it's just another option I have to explore now since as someone said, "beggars can't be choosers"

    I'm not being choosy when it comes to boutiques or internships and would be perfectly happy with that, but have not had great luck with finding these either. I know doostang has a lot of posts but these are mostly in the US, which I don't have a work visa for.

    Is 1) not really a good idea? I will have to take about 10 courses to complete the diploma/certificate from a local university, and I feel like it will actually be useful for S&T and research which I'm more interested in. Also, I'm wondering if it will almost be like delaying my graduation and giving me a better shot at the next recruiting cycle?

    Thanks again for all the suggestions !

  • Sexy_Like_Enrique's picture

    damn bro, sorry to hear about your situation.

    you might want to check out consulting, or some other areas of employers such as corp finance, etc.

    btw, what major did you pursue at your grad school? If you did MSF, and didn't get FO in finance, that really sucks.

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  • ragnar danneskjöld's picture

    Raise some capital, start your own business and be your own boss.

    Get you CFA or whatever you want to do to help pad your resume in the mean time...

    A little entrepreneurial experience will never hurt your resume as long as you maintain your network.

  • In reply to ragnar danneskjöld
    Sexy_Like_Enrique's picture

    ragnar danneskjold:
    Raise some capital, start your own business and be your own boss.

    Get you CFA or whatever you want to do to help pad your resume in the mean time...

    A little entrepreneurial experience will never hurt your resume as long as you maintain your network.

    what kind of business are you talking about... just curious as to what people would do if they were to actually start their business..

  • In reply to miss-chief
    heister's picture

    Lily_1988:
    Flake:
    You can come work under me.

    I know you're teasing but I would take that offer in a heartbeat lol

    You must not know flake...

    Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

    Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

  • In reply to miss-chief
    STorIB's picture

    Lily_1988:
    Flake:
    You can come work under me.

    I know you're teasing but I would take that offer in a heartbeat lol

    Trust us... you'd rather be unemployed with zero hope.

  • ShreddiesBrah's picture

    How long can you do #2 for? Might be worth doing that and applying for grad spots again next year, while diversifying into consulting this time

  • STorIB's picture

    Am I missing something? She said she just finished her masters... why is everyone recommending more school? It's obviously not working out too well.

    Your best bet is to talk to your finance professors first if they know anyone at boutique or MM firms. Talk to some of your friends who got offers and try to set up time to meet with them.

  • In reply to Revolution
    Sandhurst's picture

    Revolution:
    time is better spent networking, chasing down leads, and practicing your non-regional diction

    I just can't let this go unnoticed....

    "There are three ways to make a living in this business: be first, be smarter, or cheat."

  • In reply to heister
    Flake's picture

    heister:
    Lily_1988:
    Flake:
    You can come work under me.

    I know you're teasing but I would take that offer in a heartbeat lol

    You must not know flake...

    You're just jealous of my e-game.

    Under my tutelage, you will grow from boys to men. From men into gladiators. And from gladiators into SWANSONS.

  • miss-chief's picture

    Haha

    All joking aside, I can't afford more Masters degrees or an MBA right now-

    Would a programming diploma not be useful for roles in market finance and make me a stronger candidate for next year? Most people don't seem to think it's a good idea.

  • In reply to Flake
    General Disarray's picture

    Flake:
    heister:
    Lily_1988:
    Flake:
    You can come work under me.

    I know you're teasing but I would take that offer in a heartbeat lol

    You must not know flake...

    You're just jealous of my e-game.

    Teach me your ways!

  • In reply to miss-chief
    runthetown's picture

    Lily_1988:
    Haha

    All joking aside, I can't afford more Masters degrees or an MBA right now-

    Would a programming diploma not be useful for roles in market finance and make me a stronger candidate for next year? Most people don't seem to think it's a good idea.

    No unless you want to be pigeonholed into being a programmer or something. Finance is in a bloodshed right now. If that's what you really want to do, keep searching and applying and do a combination of option 3 and 5 but also look for a FT consulting or something decent (option 4).

  • In reply to Sandhurst
    Revolution's picture

    Sandhurst:
    Revolution:
    time is better spent networking, chasing down leads, and practicing your non-regional diction

    I just can't let this go unnoticed....

    Damn at least somebody did.

  • In reply to miss-chief
    Ash_nash's picture

    Lily_1988:
    Haha

    All joking aside, I can't afford more Masters degrees or an MBA right now-

    Would a programming diploma not be useful for roles in market finance and make me a stronger candidate for next year? Most people don't seem to think it's a good idea.

    I personally don't think that more school is a good idea. If you went to a target as you mentioned people would know that you didn't get a job. Studying on the side for the CFA might be good, but you still need something else. The thing about education is that you already have enough and your competition does as well. That is really not what will make or break you.Bottom line is work experience will be more valued at this point than further study. If you think you can find any decent work experience while you keep looking, great. Otherwise, go for the CFA plus some other activity and become a networking machine.

    So I echo the advice given by other posters: focus on as few types of position as possible and network. And network properly. There are tons of resources online that teach you how to do it (plus you should reach out to friends, professors and mentors for advice on this). Even if you think you have a good handle on it, be humble and keep learning. Reaching out to people in the right way and presenting yourself properly will do more for you than more academic credentials. Reach out to everyone. Don't leave any stone unturned and follow up!

    Acknowledge the official procedures and deadlines in your search, but ultimately you need to create your own opportunities. There must be some out there, you should get out there and try to find them.

    Best of luck, man.

  • Yohoo's picture

    You don't want back office?

    Great back office doesn't want you too. As a matter of fact no body wants you. Otherwise,you would have gotten an offer.

    Some people would kill to just get a job but the shit head is being capricious and he can't even afford his MBA yet.

    A job is better than no job

    No one would remember the Good Samaritan if he'd only had good intentions; he had money as well.

  • victoryville's picture

    network network network. cold e-mail AND cold call.

  • heister's picture

    We might have found an canidate to be my assistant.

    Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

    Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

  • In reply to Yohoo
    Sexy_Like_Enrique's picture

    Yohoo:
    You don't want back office?

    Great back office doesn't want you too. As a matter of fact no body wants you. Otherwise,you would have gotten an offer.

    Some people would kill to just get a job but the shit head is being capricious and he can't even afford his MBA yet.

    A job is better than no job

    LOL.... so crude, but kinda true.

  • rastarocket's picture

    I understand its tough - but I can't help being pissed off by people like you who whine about lack of "luck" and being "cheated" out of a job.

    My girlfriend graduated from a master at LSE and it took her 1 year to find a job in IBD - in the meantime she worked at Starbucks while networking like hell and applying to every single place in Europe, including places like Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. She got eventually got a 1 year placement at a BB (a few weeks short of getting kicked out of the country because of visa status) but she didnt get an offer at the end of it. Again unemployed for 6 months. Then she got a spot at a small boutique (where I met her), later moved to a BB and 4 years on she works for the largest PE fund in Europe.

    So my advice:
    1. Stop whining and start behaving like a man
    2. Start networking your ass off, and prepare for interviews and if you're so good as you say you are, you'll get the job you want. In the meantime, settle for something less i.e. BO or MO job, or unpaid internships in FO if you can afford it
    3. Yeah its a recession but trust me it was 10x worse back in 2008, and people still managed. Stop finding excuses.
    4. Tell you a secret about life - its not a box of chocolates. you can't always get want you want easily and sometimes, you will need to settle for something less glamourous or something you don't like as a first step to your dream job.

    That said, good luck.

  • rothyman's picture

    The phone is a great invention. Pick it up.

    I've probably filled out hundreds to thousands of apps online and guess how many interviews that has landed me?

    1.

    A week or two ago I did 10 cold calls and guess how many I got?

    3.

    Again, pick up the phone and let these people know you're interested and persistent.

  • Angelus99's picture

    What rothy just said is crucial because we are dealing with a work situation that is specifically against us.
    Networking is the one and only thing that you can control....the more people you know the more likely it is for you to make it. I have literally built a network within ms, gs, cs, jpm, and brock all from scratch....I absolutely had none to start with and now i have over 30 connections there that are all vp, ed, md status....built it all within 5 months.....the point of all this is that you need to make your own "luck" and "opportunity"

    Beast

  • In reply to runningcitylikediddy
    Yohoo's picture

    runningcitylikediddy:
    keep on looking, dont give up

    He will have to give up because he will never see what he is looking for. At least not in the next six months.

    He wants a FO position but no FO wants him.
    Now he needs to settle with a McDonald job, earn some cash instead of being a couch potato and network to get a job.

    No one would remember the Good Samaritan if he'd only had good intentions; he had money as well.

  • Maximus Decimus Meridius's picture

    Not trying to be an ass or anything, but you must be doing something wrong. If you go to a target school, have good grades and got interviews but didn't land a job it's your problem. You can't blame it on luck or the economic situation, because that's the same for everyone and there are plenty of people getting jobs and many of them come from worse situations than you do. So what you need to do is find out what you're doing wrong (have you asked your interviewers?) and fix it, going to school or making more applications won't help, you'll just get rejected again because of whatever you're doing wrong. Stop making excuses. BBs are only hiring 0-5 analysts? Maybe apart from the ones they already have signed after the summer internships, and the fact that you're not one of them is your fault too. And I even doubt that, otherwise I know all the new analysts and my friends are extremely lucky.

    As to what to do while you fix that, I think your best bet is getting a MO/BO role (if you can) and try networking from there. Worst case scenario, you'll have to go get an MBA after a couple of years to transition to FO. Consulting would be better, but there's no way you're getting an MBB consulting gig if you can't get into banking (again, not trying to be an ass, but you seem a bit out of touch with reality)

  • craze_peep's picture

    Take up the offer you have on hand. Trust me, people would worry more about the gap on your resume rather than whether you worked FO/BO/MO.

    I graduated three years ago and I am still unemployed. Have been supporting myself through doing various IBD placements. Took alot of networking. None of them led to an offer (for various reasons). My work permit situation didn't help either - I have to pretty much go for the large well-established firms who were in a position to sponsor me.

    I can't tell you the number of sleepless nights I have worrying about my career/financial situation. I had the opportunity to work in a much less glamorous job, but I passed it on. Obviously, I wish I hadn't done that now. So, think twice about turning anything down.

    I have pretty much ditched m&a, and focusing on other things now (think I have a month before I have to leave the country!). But it took awhile for me to reach that state of mind.

    Good luck anyway.

    rastarocket: nice ending to that story. hopefully something nice like that happens!

  • In reply to rastarocket
    chicandtoughness's picture

    rastarocket:
    So my advice:
    1. Stop whining and start behaving like a man
    2. Start networking your ass off, and prepare for interviews and if you're so good as you say you are, you'll get the job you want. In the meantime, settle for something less i.e. BO or MO job, or unpaid internships in FO if you can afford it
    3. Yeah its a recession but trust me it was 10x worse back in 2008, and people still managed. Stop finding excuses.
    4. Tell you a secret about life - its not a box of chocolates. you can't always get want you want easily and sometimes, you will need to settle for something less glamourous or something you don't like as a first step to your dream job.

    THIS. SB. More people need to be blunt here instead of whining about the economy. You can't control the economy, it sucks, what are you going to do? Let's just keep pounding away at it, constantly improve your tactics and network -smarter- (not just -more-) do what you can to earn a living and move your way up. There's a Chinese proverb that goes, "Sometimes, you have to ride a cow in order to find a horse" - sometimes, you gotta take the less glamorous route as a temporary measure in order to achieve your end goal.

    Btw, rothy's advice about the phone is major legit. Most of my interviews were through a combination of cold-emails + cold-calls. You sound much more convincing and hungry for the job when they can actually hear you as a living, breathing person on the phone than text on a screen.

    Currently: becoming a clinical psychologist... yep, I quit finance
    Previously: M&A consulting (Big 4), M&A banking (MM), business research (HBS)

  • In reply to rastarocket
    Sexy_Like_Enrique's picture

    rastarocket:
    I understand its tough - but I can't help being pissed off by people like you who whine about lack of "luck" and being "cheated" out of a job.

    My girlfriend graduated from a master at LSE and it took her 1 year to find a job in IBD - in the meantime she worked at Starbucks while networking like hell and applying to every single place in Europe, including places like Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. She got eventually got a 1 year placement at a BB (a few weeks short of getting kicked out of the country because of visa status) but she didnt get an offer at the end of it. Again unemployed for 6 months. Then she got a spot at a small boutique (where I met her), later moved to a BB and 4 years on she works for the largest PE fund in Europe.

    So my advice:
    1. Stop whining and start behaving like a man
    2. Start networking your ass off, and prepare for interviews and if you're so good as you say you are, you'll get the job you want. In the meantime, settle for something less i.e. BO or MO job, or unpaid internships in FO if you can afford it
    3. Yeah its a recession but trust me it was 10x worse back in 2008, and people still managed. Stop finding excuses.
    4. Tell you a secret about life - its not a box of chocolates. you can't always get want you want easily and sometimes, you will need to settle for something less glamourous or something you don't like as a first step to your dream job.

    That said, good luck.

    wow. this story is amazing...

  • miss-chief's picture

    Hey thanks for the advice everyone. I realize I may have come across the wrong way - I'm not trying to sit here and whine about the economy and taking off all the blame from myself. I'm asking for suggestions on how to keep plowing on and increase my chances for next year, and I'm explaining that in a normal year I would have a much better chance based on my credentials. I've had many friends and contacts in the industry look at my resume, and they all said I'm a strong candidate but the UK market is horrible.

    And some of your criticism is a little harsh and unwarranted in my opinion:

    True I didn't get converted after the internship , and I have explained the reason in another post- I worked my ass off and did get good reviews and an offer but it was later withdrawn due to the market downturn. That was really difficult but I sucked it up, got back on my feet and went back into the recruiting game. Can you blame me if I attribute that to a bit of bad luck?

    I'm assuming you are mostly recruiting in the US- It 's a fact that recruiting is a lot better right now in the US than the UK. It is a matter of fact that many BB FT programs are not recruiting, and even people I know with 1+ year experience are applying for INTERNSHIPS . I have heard many recruiters and job searchers in the UK echo the sentiment that this is as bad as 2008 (if you don't believe me please check efinancialcareers articles). Very few people are getting interviews/offers even from my target school this year.

    It's not just me in this situation I know, so I DONT intend to just sit here feeling sorry for myself.

    As I said, I went to an interview with a BB but lost the position to an experienced hire (I don't think that's a problem with my interviewing ability as the team liked me) and another one where the final round was cancelled due to the market downturn. I'm also on hold at one BB after final round because although my other interviews were strong, I just couldn't click with one of the interviewers even though I tried- this is my own fault and I'm not blaming anyone or anything else for it lol.

    Many of you are saying stop whining and start acting, but that's PRECISELY what I'm trying to do do! I'm trying to get the advice on the best things I can do to fill my time and my resume from you experienced people here.

    I have started cold calling. I'm definitely not whining about having to cold call or put in the extra work or work for free and I'm not gunning for just BBs! - I am NOT being a couch potato and I'm actively trying to network while also working a contract job to support msyelf (which I dont intend to put on my resume), so please don't attack me based on false conclusions. I decided not to take the offer I had (that was akin to a backoffice job) because I thought that doing more schooling + doing research +(hopefully) doing an unpaid internship at a boutique would look better in the long run and I'm willing to live very frugally and work odd part-time jobs to support myself while I do that. Some people here and my friends in FO make the BO sound like the kiss of death when it' a full-time job, which is why I was very hesitant to take that offer.

    Anyways I do appreciate all the good advice! Just felt compelled to defend myself against false accusations and misunderstandings so please don't take this the wrong way. Thank you all :) I wish all of us who are still recruiting the very best of luck!

  • rastarocket's picture

    most times, when somebody said "we liked you but had a better candidate", its because people are being politically correct (especially in the UK). Ask them what your weaknesses were (more diplomatic way of asking why they didn't take you) and you can try to work and focus on those points. Ask them about your strengths as well to get some well needed ego boost.

    For networking, in the UK, calling people doesn't work as well as sending emails - use linkedin and get introduction from friends. Also, try to talk to hedge funds in London - there are thousands of them and some of them are doing extremely well. But DO NOT mention that you are unlucky / finding a job is hard / how many calls you made because there is big chance that they've been through much worse than you.

    Lots of the jobs are not on efinancials - forget efinancials, I never ever got a job through a headhunter. They are only useful for lateral moves for experienced people or for people with spotless CVs.

    I talked to a kid like you 6 months ago and he settled for a BO job at MS. I think its a neat place to start your career, at least for your first year. If your background is so good, you'll end up in FO in no time. But as I said, if you can get a unpaid internship in FO, I would definitely take that over a BO job,

  • In reply to rastarocket
    miss-chief's picture

    rastarocket:
    most times, when somebody said "we liked you but had a better candidate", its because people are being politically correct (especially in the UK). Ask them what your weaknesses were (more diplomatic way of asking why they didn't take you) and you can try to work and focus on those points. Ask them about your strengths as well to get some well needed ego boost.

    For networking, in the UK, calling people doesn't work as well as sending emails - use linkedin and get introduction from friends. Also, try to talk to hedge funds in London - there are thousands of them and some of them are doing extremely well. But DO NOT mention that you are unlucky / finding a job is hard / how many calls you made because there is big chance that they've been through much worse than you.

    Lots of the jobs are not on efinancials - forget efinancials, I never ever got a job through a headhunter. They are only useful for lateral moves for experienced people or for people with spotless CVs.

    I talked to a kid like you 6 months ago and he settled for a BO job at MS. I think its a neat place to start your career, at least for your first year. If your background is so good, you'll end up in FO in no time. But as I said, if you can get a unpaid internship in FO, I would definitely take that over a BO job,

    Thanks ratarocket! I make it a rule to always ask for feedback after interviews, and know what my strengths are and have tried to improve upon my weaknesses. In terms of the job I lost to an experienced candidate, it was not a a graduate position but an ad-hoc role (the BB is not hiring for graduate FT roles this year), so I think that was actually the reason as I was told honestly that they were taking someone with experience instead.

    My concern about BO is that people here and my friends in FO always make it seem like you will be labelled "BO" forever. It's not that I think I'm too good for the job but that is what worries me - have you not found that to be true in your experience?

    Your girlfriend's story is extremely encouraging! Did she encounter any problems in terms of justifying her gaps in her CV while she was working at starbucks when she was gunning for a BB job a year after her graduation?

  • rastarocket's picture

    well I started in BO, but moved out rapidly. Its true that is is very hard to break out from BO to FO, but it depends on the company. Also depends on your age and if you are young enough (<25) and hungry enough you will be ok, just don't stay there for more than a year.

    You may want to try some other FO jobs like IBD or Corporate Banking, Structured Finance ,etc. or even some research work with smaller places, or consulting work. Not for your teacher though, but for a proper corporate or city institution. This is a much easier sell for a S&T job later on. Another friend of mine went from big 4 audit into FX trading so also have a go at big 4. Competition is fierce and the economy is bad - so you just need to go off the beaten path. But seriously, knock on the doors of the thousands of hedge funds out there, there must be a place in need of free labour somewhere.

  • rastarocket's picture

    have you tried places like M&G, the London Stock Exchange (excellent graduate programme for a potential move to S&T), the Ratings Agencies, and all those brokers Marex, Numis, Charles Stanley,etc. there is an entire world besides bulge brackets and banks ... and there is always the MBA option if you can't find a great job in the short term. Even go work for Bloomberg or Mergermarket and build a finance network and a great MBA story!!!

  • Relinquis's picture

    Have you thought of join a relevant professional society in order to attend their conferences / talks? They are useful to keep in the loop on what's going on in the industry, to meet people and learn about firms that you have never heard of etc...

  • In reply to rastarocket
    miss-chief's picture

    rastarocket:
    have you tried places like M&G, the London Stock Exchange (excellent graduate programme for a potential move to S&T), the Ratings Agencies, and all those brokers Marex, Numis, Charles Stanley,etc. there is an entire world besides bulge brackets and banks ... and there is always the MBA option if you can't find a great job in the short term. Even go work for Bloomberg or Mergermarket and build a finance network and a great MBA story!!!

    Yes I've been exploring other options as well and applying whenever I have time. I am now considering IBD, IM and consulting ECM/DCM Structure Finance and whatever else since S&T recruiting has been especially bad. I'm just going to keep on sending in applications and hope that it works out! Thank you so much for all your advice. Truly appreciate it !

  • In reply to Relinquis
    miss-chief's picture

    Relinquis:
    Have you thought of join a relevant professional society in order to attend their conferences / talks? They are useful to keep in the loop on what's going on in the industry, to meet people and learn about firms that you have never heard of etc...

    That sounds like a great idea.
    Can you give me an example of the types of societies I can join ?(exclding CFA since that will require me to get chartered first).

  • rastarocket's picture

    societies dont help... just go to conferences and meet people (LSE conference, Finance Clubs conferences). Linkedin!!!!!

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