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Mensa --> society that accepts people who have top 1% IQ. Just wondering if this is a good idea to put on my resume or if it has no relevance and may seem them I'm too smart for my own good. But then again, since I'm from a non-target it would show that I'm not a nut.

Will this do any good?

Thanks!

Comments (14)

  • CompBanker's picture

    Putting MENSA on your resume is a contradiction. By including it on your resume, you clearly aren't in the top 1% of intelligence.

    CompBanker

  • Kanon's picture

    Dude... why did you create multiple posts on this? You've done this for your free lunch thing too.

    If you put MENSA on your resume, be ready for interviewers to go hard on you.

  • Smooth_Nico's picture

    Well put- I agree with comp banker... I would look for other more subtle ways of bragging about your intellectual abilities

  • In reply to Kanon
    Getgo's picture

    Kanon wrote:
    Dude... why did you create multiple posts on this? You've done this for your free lunch thing too.

    If you put MENSA on your resume, be ready for interviewers to go hard on you.

    I put it under Job Search Advice and also Investment Banking since I figure 2 different categories of people read that. However, I will try to limit it to one post in the future.

  • PossumBelly's picture

    you can get in mensa with 95%tile gmat. Hardly indicative of super freak genius intelligence. You could 99% on the verbal and 70th percentile math and achieve that.

  • shorttheworld's picture

    its actually top 2 percent, so from one mensan to a supposed another... im not so sure how MENSA you are :P

  • In reply to shorttheworld
    Getgo's picture

    shorttheworld wrote:
    its actually top 2 percent, so from one mensan to a supposed another... im not so sure how MENSA you are :P

    Lol. Well, I was in OATHS society (which is 1%) but its members are far too individualistic. I find fellow mensans to be more friendly and the yearly fee isn't too bad either.

  • Getgo's picture

    *Correction:* OATHS Society (.1%) A title I'm happy to give up for some actual tangible benefits that I derive from Mensan members.

  • shorttheworld's picture

    noone will know what the fuck that is then... and i thought it was prometheus society?

  • jtbbdxbnycmad's picture

    There are many high IQ societies and MENSA is the most high-profile/least exclusive, taking people with a 98th percentile or higher and accepting standardized academic tests as proxies for the Weschler/Stanford-Binet/standard MENSA test.

    I would not do it. The last time I volunteered my IQ score was around 10 years ago and I quickly learned that it does not impress the right people; in fact, it'll do the opposite - impress insecure morons while turning off the people worth impressing. Don't do it, it's a serious faux pas. One thing is to know your IQ - that's legitimate. Another thing is to mail in your score as an application for membership in a high IQ society - which I find tragic, but still legitimate. Another is to broadcast that to your employers - which is mindless.

    Think about it for a moment: who's going to read your resumé? If the person has a more modest IQ, s/he's going to think "what an arrogant prick" - NOT "what a genius!". If the person has a MENSA level IQ and didn't bother becoming a member, s/he's going to think "what an insecure prick" - NOT "what a genius!". And if the person happens to be a fellow MENSA member, they're going to think "oh crap, better not associate myself with this prick, it'll undermine my own credibility in the firm." Your best hope is that the reader doesn't even know what MENSA is and thinks it's some "MEN'S Aftershave" group.

    In addition to giving off a poor impression as a person, there are at least two further reasons why it's a silly move.
    1. I'd say that easily a quarter of the front-office folks hired at top firms have that IQ (and I'm being conservative). If I had to guess, I'm more inclined to think that there are more folks who are "120ish IQ and incredibly hard working" but there are enough high IQ folks for it to be considered normal and wholly unexceptional, so you would not be standing out.
    2. You're never going to be hired just for your brains: you're hired for what you can do with your brains. Accomplish or do things that show you have the brains, rather than tell them you have the brains (which, as I said before, won't help you stand out, but rather, show that you are normal by a top firm's standards). You will be inviting them to wonder whether you have any accomplishments at all to show your intelligence.

  • In reply to jtbbdxbnycmad
    Getgo's picture

    jtbbdxbnycmad wrote:
    There are many high IQ societies and MENSA is the most high-profile/least exclusive, taking people with a 98th percentile or higher and accepting standardized academic tests as proxies for the Weschler/Stanford-Binet/standard MENSA test.

    I would not do it. The last time I volunteered my IQ score was around 10 years ago and I quickly learned that it does not impress the right people; in fact, it'll do the opposite - impress insecure morons while turning off the people worth impressing. Don't do it, it's a serious faux pas. One thing is to know your IQ - that's legitimate. Another thing is to mail in your score as an application for membership in a high IQ society - which I find tragic, but still legitimate. Another is to broadcast that to your employers - which is mindless.

    Think about it for a moment: who's going to read your resumé? If the person has a more modest IQ, s/he's going to think "what an arrogant prick" - NOT "what a genius!". If the person has a MENSA level IQ and didn't bother becoming a member, s/he's going to think "what an insecure prick" - NOT "what a genius!". And if the person happens to be a fellow MENSA member, they're going to think "oh crap, better not associate myself with this prick, it'll undermine my own credibility in the firm." Your best hope is that the reader doesn't even know what MENSA is and thinks it's some "MEN'S Aftershave" group.

    In addition to giving off a poor impression as a person, there are at least two further reasons why it's a silly move.
    1. I'd say that easily a quarter of the front-office folks hired at top firms have that IQ (and I'm being conservative). If I had to guess, I'm more inclined to think that there are more folks who are "120ish IQ and incredibly hard working" but there are enough high IQ folks for it to be considered normal and wholly unexceptional, so you would not be standing out.
    2. You're never going to be hired just for your brains: you're hired for what you can do with your brains. Accomplish or do things that show you have the brains, rather than tell them you have the brains (which, as I said before, won't help you stand out, but rather, show that you are normal by a top firm's standards). You will be inviting them to wonder whether you have any accomplishments at all to show your intelligence.

    Good post. Good insight. It always comes down to insecurity.

    Thank you for answering the question.

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