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Attention high school men: if you end up going to a college with a dominant Greek presence (most large state schools in the south), join a frat. Not joining a frat is my one regret of college. Not sure if it's just my school, but 95% of the hot girls at my campus are in sororities. As ridiculous as that sounds, I'm not even exaggerating. Not only are they hotter, but they're also easier because it's part of their culture.

Of course if you already have an awesome group of friends, then there's no need to bother joining a frat. But if you don't have a solid social network that you're content with after your first semester (aka your roommates are antisocial losers and you're not in any clubs or anything), then do it. After freshman year, you'll be too busy and won't have the time to pledge.

Also, if you go to a school with a high male/female ratio and/or you're in a major where finding a bangable girl is rarer than spotting an ultra-rare pokemon (eg. math, engineering), then this advice goes double for you. There's no reason to deprive yourself of the easiest pussy you'll ever get (especially once you become a senior).

That is all.

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Comments (46)

  • moneymogul's picture

    Exact reason why I went Greek. I came to my large southern state school with only a few kids from my high school that I barely ever talked to, all the hot girls were in sororities. Pledged a top house, got my shit kicked for a semester, and haven't looked back since. Easily one of the best decisions I've ever made.

    "Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected." - Jobs

  • D M's picture

    Just be careful about the frat you join, a lot of them are douchebags and will do nothing for your social, personal, or professional life.

    "You stop being an asshole when it sucks to be you." -IlliniProgrammer
    "Your grammar made me wish I'd been aborted." -happypantsmcgee

  • swagon's picture

    True, but there are other reasons to join besides social ones. Yes, that's usually the main reason, but I'm proud to say my chapter really prided itself on character, academics, while also being top house. Now, I did go to a small school, so I never quite had the wild-ass SEC frat experience.

    If you do go Greek, be fratty and blah blah, all that good stuff, just don't lose yourself or become an elitist cunt. And don't let in hurt your grades (much easier said than done).

  • In reply to D M
    JDawg's picture

    D M:
    Just be careful about the frat you join, a lot of them are douchebags and will do nothing for your social, personal, or professional life.

    Yeah, you gotta talk to people at your school and find out which frats are the good ones. Not all frats are great. But find the right one and you're set.

  • In reply to swagon
    JDawg's picture

    swagon:
    And don't let in hurt your grades (much easier said than done).

    This is the main problem. It will hurt your grades (from what I've heard), but I'd still say it's worth it. I'd rather have an amazing college experience with tons of memories and friends even if it means having a slightly less GPA. You're only an undergraduate once. GPA doesn't really matter after a certain level anyways.

  • In reply to JDawg
    swagon's picture

    JDawg:
    swagon:
    And don't let in hurt your grades (much easier said than done).

    This is the main problem. It will hurt your grades (from what I've heard), but I'd still say it's worth it. I'd rather have an amazing college experience with tons of memories and friends even if it means having a slightly less GPA. You're only an undergraduate once. GPA doesn't really matter after a certain level anyways.


    Where it gets really tough is when you have to balance school with networking from a nontarget, and if you have an internship during school or even just some major extracurriculars, then any significant fraternity involvement will probably require sacrifices from other said obligations...there's only 24 hours in a day - learn time management and discipline as early as possible. Try to study as much as you can, and as efficiently as you can, after class during the weekdays when people won't be doing as much socially. Wish I could go back and implement that strategy more effectively. Of course study finance so you don't have to spend time learning it for interviews and internships, that'd just be a damn nightmare on top of everything.

    Get to know your pledge brothers as well as you can given your time constraints, you'll be so damn glad you did at graduation and beyond. At the very least, focus on a few key pledge bros you can become great friends with. Also, try to garner respect early in pledgeship. Like the superbad quote says "people don't forget!" so don't puke on a brother or piss your pants drunk and pass out in front of sorority quad during pledgeship.

  • Thedss's picture

    I joined a frat last year and I have mixed feelings about it. Yes, you do get to party with some really hot girls and get your dick wet. That is true. The problem is, there is a serious lack of seriousness among most of my fraternity. A lot of them smoke/drink all the time and just fuck around with school. But because their dad is CEO of some company, they are fine. Some guys are fine, but a lot of them are in fact douchebags. Maybe I just joined a slightly more douchy one.

  • In reply to swagon
    wantajob's picture

    swagon:
    JDawg:
    swagon:
    And don't let in hurt your grades (much easier said than done).

    This is the main problem. It will hurt your grades (from what I've heard), but I'd still say it's worth it. I'd rather have an amazing college experience with tons of memories and friends even if it means having a slightly less GPA. You're only an undergraduate once. GPA doesn't really matter after a certain level anyways.


    Where it gets really tough is when you have to balance school with networking from a nontarget, and if you have an internship during school or even just some major extracurriculars, then any significant fraternity involvement will probably require sacrifices from other said obligations...there's only 24 hours in a day - learn time management and discipline as early as possible. Try to study as much as you can, and as efficiently as you can, after class during the weekdays when people won't be doing as much socially. Wish I could go back and implement that strategy more effectively. Of course study finance so you don't have to spend time learning it for interviews and internships, that'd just be a damn nightmare on top of everything.

    Get to know your pledge brothers as well as you can given your time constraints, you'll be so damn glad you did at graduation and beyond. At the very least, focus on a few key pledge bros you can become great friends with. Also, try to garner respect early in pledgeship. Like the superbad quote says "people don't forget!" so don't puke on a brother or piss your pants drunk and pass out in front of sorority quad during pledgeship.

    To your last line...you didn't pledge a real frat if that wasn't inevitable.

  • 24837's picture

    I joined a frat, and i'm not sure it was worth it.

    Then again, German fraternities are a bit "rougher around the edges" than American ones.
    If you think US frats drink vigorously think again; much harder disciplining in the first semester e.g. no personal cell phone; you have to participate in fencing duels which means training on a daily basis - plus you're quite likely to graduate with a scar on your face (still the mark of the conservative, educated elite in Germany).

  • DrPeterVenkman's picture

    Seriously please elaborate on German Frat Life. That sounds ridiculous.

    Also, in case anyone hasn't seen this site it is pretty funny: www.TotalFratMove.com

  • kmzz's picture

    as sad as it is i agree 100% with the OP

    i transferred and was scared of fucking up 1 of my 4 remaining semesters (whereas if u start freshman year you have much more time to make it up). huge regret

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  • D M's picture

    Yea, if you're transferring I'd definitely be careful about a frat. It's a great way to get involved on campus and meet people, but it's also a great way to screw your chances of getting an internship or FT job.

    As long as you know the score and make sure you take care of your business, you should be fine joining a frat. Of course, everyone says they're going to do that and most don't.

    "You stop being an asshole when it sucks to be you." -IlliniProgrammer
    "Your grammar made me wish I'd been aborted." -happypantsmcgee

  • In reply to wantajob
    swagon's picture

    wantajob:

    To your last line...you didn't pledge a real frat if that wasn't inevitable.

    Hey, cool bro, thanks for your contribution.
  • blackrainn's picture

    I go to a smaller top school, and it really is a mixed bag. Some people love it, some people hate it, and some people are in-between. I think it's a great idea to rush and get a sense of what's out there, but I personally did not join a frat because of the time constraints involved and talking to older students. Unless a frat really jives with you and you can really see yourself as a member of the frat, then I don't think it is a great idea to pledge. Plus, if you have good friends in the frats you can still go to parties and not have to deal with everything else. I also find a lot of people become "consumed" by their fraternity / sorority and don't really have a broader social life, but again it varies from person to person.

  • sdmcarth's picture

    I joined a fraternity first semester my freshman year, got a 3.4 during pledging at what I would like to think is an academically credible school, and haven't regretted any of it. The social benefits themselves make it worth it but other benefits exist. I would argue that being in a fraternity helped my GPA. I studied a lot with my fraternity brothers and i definitely think that helped me in the long run. Also, the network you have access to is incredible. Its one thing to contact an alumni from your university, but to contact an alum from your school that was in your fraternity gives you quite a leg up on the competition. My fraternity brother did just that and landed a BB IB summer internship.

  • JeffSkilling's picture

    The problem with frats is that you rush when you're 18 and almost no one has their shit together at that stage, let alone are thinking about getting into banking. If you're not a total fuckup though, you should absolutely rush.

  • TheKid1's picture

    I do regret not joining a fraternity..

  • In reply to DrPeterVenkman
    24837's picture

    FinanceStudent28:
    Seriously please elaborate on German Frat Life. That sounds ridiculous.

    I'll let Mark Twain do the talking:

    One day in the interest of science my agent obtained permission to bring me to the students` dueling-place.
    (...)
    It was observable that the young gentlemen neither bowed to nor spoke with students whose caps differed in color from their own. This did not mean hostility, but only an armed neutrality. It was considered that a person could strike harder in the duel, and with a more earnest interest, if he had never been in a condition of comradeship with his antagonist; therefore, comradeship between the corps was not permitted. At intervals the presidents of the five corps have a cold official intercourse with each other, but nothing further. For example, when the regular dueling-day of one of the corps approaches, its president calls for volunteers from among the membership to offer battle; three or more respond--but there must not be less than three; the president lays their names before the other presidents, with the request that they furnish antagonists for these challengers from among their corps. This is promptly done. It chanced that the present occasion was the battle-day of the Red Cap Corps. They were the challengers, and certain caps of other colors had volunteered to meet them. The students fight duels in the room which I have described, TWO DAYS IN EVERY WEEK DURING SEVEN AND A HALF OR EIGHT MONTHS IN EVERY YEAR. This custom had continued in Germany two hundred and fifty years.

    ...

    The combatants were watching each other with alert eyes; a perfect stillness, a breathless interest reigned. I felt that I was going to see some wary work. But not so. The instant the word was given, the two apparitions sprang forward and began to rain blows down upon each other with such lightning rapidity that I could not quite tell whether I saw the swords or only flashes they made in the air; the rattling din of these blows as they struck steel or paddings was something wonderfully stirring, and they were struck with such terrific force that I could not understand why the opposing sword was not beaten down under the assault. Presently, in the midst of the sword-flashes, I saw a handful of hair skip into the air as if it had lain loose on the victim`s head and a breath of wind had puffed it suddenly away.

    The seconds cried "Halt!" and knocked up the combatants` swords with their own. The duelists sat down; a student official stepped forward, examined the wounded head and touched the place with a sponge once or twice; the surgeon came and turned back the hair from the wound-- and revealed a crimson gash two or three inches long, and proceeded to bind an oval piece of leather and a bunch of lint over it; the tally-keeper stepped up and tallied one for the opposition in his book.

    Then the duelists took position again; a small stream of blood was flowing down the side of the injured man`s head, and over his shoulder and down his body to the floor, but he did not seem to mind this. The word was given, and they plunged at each other as fiercely as before; once more the blows rained and rattled and flashed; every few moments the quick-eyed seconds would notice that a sword was bent--then they called "Halt!" struck up the contending weapons, and an assisting student straightened the bent one.

    The wonderful turmoil went on--presently a bright spark sprung from a blade, and that blade broken in several pieces, sent one of its fragments flying to the ceiling. A new sword was provided and the fight proceeded.

    full text:
    http://www.classicauthors.net/Twain/trampabroad/tr...

    story actually takes place in my hometown!

    academic fencing still takes place, more or less exactly as described - it's been following the same set of rules for centuries, so obviously no huge changes are to be expected.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_fencing

  • Chocobo's picture

    I pledged for a business frat once, and they accepted girls as well since this was a professional frat. The main reason I pledged was to network and make connections with the alumni. However, at the end of the pledging process, I learned that the alumni brothers aren't exactly willing to network much, and I started to feel like I was paying to make friends as well. Plus, it felt like these students had no ambition to do anything other than just making sure they get a regular 9 to 5 job (not that it's bad...just thought there would at least be one person who wanted to not rely only on their career center and break into IB or something from a nontarget.). And the frat had all these directors for the smallest things so that anyone can say they are the director of bullshit. At the end of it, everything felt like bullshit & everyone seemed to be pretentious so I quit before initiation.

    I don't regret not joining them, but occasionally, when I run into the students who were pledging with me, they don't even bother saying hi or acknowledging they made eye contact with me. It's like I'm shunned, which just pisses me off cause I was the only one who even ran for pledge class president in the first place (no one wanted the responsibility and they were afraid of having a more stressful pledging experience) and even though I was unsure about joining them, I made sure my pledge class didn't suffer. I did everything I can to make their life easier and prepared them for initiation as much as I can.

    Yes, it does look bad when your president quits, but before I started pledging, I actually had travel plans which coincidentally was during the weekend of initiation so I prepared the vice president to take charge for that weekend from the beginning.

    I don't know if what I did was wrong, but I don't regret any of it. To me, it was a fun experience as the pledge class president. I loved helping everyone, listening to their concerns, organizing everything & etc. I just didn't want to pay to join something that felt like it wasn't worth my time.

  • boofratley's picture
  • BigTalkinWalker's picture

    I'm going to be a senior next semester.

    I know frats that let seniors pledge. But should I do it?

    I really want to do it for the network. I don't really care a whole lot about the social life, but that is also an excellent addition. I mean, my college life really isn't exciting, I had more fun in high school. So, I definitely wouldn't mind pledging.

  • DJ LIBOR's picture

    ^ Blossom got me a job senior year. Totally worth it

  • In reply to Thedss
    bankbank's picture

    Thedss:
    I joined a frat last year and I have mixed feelings about it. Yes, you do get to party with some really hot girls and get your dick wet. That is true. The problem is, there is a serious lack of seriousness among most of my fraternity. A lot of them smoke/drink all the time and just fuck around with school. But because their dad is CEO of some company, they are fine. Some guys are fine, but a lot of them are in fact douchebags. Maybe I just joined a slightly more douchy one.

    umm...get jobs and/or connections from the dads of your frat bros?

  • In reply to Chocobo
    bankbank's picture

    June Rose:
    I pledged for a business frat once, and they accepted girls as well since this was a professional frat. The main reason I pledged was to network and make connections with the alumni. However, at the end of the pledging process, I learned that the alumni brothers aren't exactly willing to network much, and I started to feel like I was paying to make friends as well. Plus, it felt like these students had no ambition to do anything other than just making sure they get a regular 9 to 5 job (not that it's bad...just thought there would at least be one person who wanted to not rely only on their career center and break into IB or something from a nontarget.). And the frat had all these directors for the smallest things so that anyone can say they are the director of bullshit. At the end of it, everything felt like bullshit & everyone seemed to be pretentious so I quit before initiation.

    I don't regret not joining them, but occasionally, when I run into the students who were pledging with me, they don't even bother saying hi or acknowledging they made eye contact with me. It's like I'm shunned, which just pisses me off cause I was the only one who even ran for pledge class president in the first place (no one wanted the responsibility and they were afraid of having a more stressful pledging experience) and even though I was unsure about joining them, I made sure my pledge class didn't suffer. I did everything I can to make their life easier and prepared them for initiation as much as I can.

    Yes, it does look bad when your president quits, but before I started pledging, I actually had travel plans which coincidentally was during the weekend of initiation so I prepared the vice president to take charge for that weekend from the beginning.

    I don't know if what I did was wrong, but I don't regret any of it. To me, it was a fun experience as the pledge class president. I loved helping everyone, listening to their concerns, organizing everything & etc. I just didn't want to pay to join something that felt like it wasn't worth my time.

    I don't think OP is talking about a business frat. Nor a co-ed frat (sorority?).

  • unslain's picture

    AT my school the Greek system blows, sorority girls are ugly and fraternity guys are like all drug dealers/scum bags.

    "For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?"

  • Warhead's picture

    The idea that frat shenanigans and "getting pussy" is an integral part of the college experience is very sad.

  • In reply to Warhead
    biglawgirlfriend's picture

    Warhead:
    The idea that frat shenanigans and "getting pussy" is an integral part of the college experience is very sad.

    +1

    I don't get the appeal either. I had a ton of fun in college, made wonderful memories, and managed to network with people who are now very successful...and not one of us was in a fraternity/sorority.

  • JDawg's picture

    If you don't care about easy access to easy hot girls, then don't join a frat. My post was directed towards those of us who enjoy that kind of stuff.

  • In reply to 24837
    DrPeterVenkman's picture

    24837:

    I'll let Mark Twain do the talking:

    story actually takes place in my hometown!


    Awesome!
  • mrcrassic's picture

    Fraternity life is not all black and white. It depends on the school and self-personality. Smaller schools typically have significantly weaker "Greek life" than huge state schools do. I was reminded of this when I (accidentally) visited another chapter of my fraternity in a cross-country trip I did some time ago. They were *completely* different from us socially and fraternally.

    Check out all of the fraternities before pledging to one. Some have very loose pledging programs while others are borderline illegal. Alumni networks are important; that's what differentiates a top house fraternity with one that is struggling to keep things running every year and definitely helps in landing good jobs. It's not worth joining a fraternity you won't get along too well with or benefit from later on down the road. (I did...sadly, it hasn't done much for me.)

    (Potential case-in-point: My school's Delta Tau Delta chapter, the same fraternity Jon Stewart is a member of, has the biggest house on campus and most of its members, who usually take on the "softer" degrees, are pretty athletic and have no career problems post-graduation. This is despite some of their brothers destroying this same house over 20 years ago through neglect and a continuous stream of raging parties.)

  • kstyles's picture

    possibly the first serious post that swagon has taken seriously?? we've hit a soft spot

  • TraderDaily's picture

    I regret not doing it. I've decided to pledge a grad chapter.

  • oowij's picture

    Never realized how much of a network the greek system is until I was a part of it. No regrets made here, if you have the time to pledge...Do it.

  • Mazoku's picture

    I go to an SEC school where probably >60% of males are in a frat. The networking and cute girls are plentiful, but I just can't stand 80% of the people in them. I do kinda regret not pledging though, the networking you get from a fraternity is top notch.

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  • In reply to idrankmalk
    Senvik's picture

    "You stop being an asshole when it sucks to be you." - IlliniProgrammer

  • aicccia's picture

    "It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer." - Albert Einstein

  • CountryUnderdog's picture

    "They are all former investment bankers that were laid off in the economic collapse that Nancy Pelosi caused. They have no marketable skills, but by God they work hard."

  • In reply to aicccia
    CountryUnderdog's picture

    "They are all former investment bankers that were laid off in the economic collapse that Nancy Pelosi caused. They have no marketable skills, but by God they work hard."