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Got accepted in Stern, Sloan and Yale MBA programs and having hard time deciding where to go. I want to get a job in IB after graduation and it seems that Stern has a great name in finance. But MIT Sloan is ranked much better than Stern. I think I am not considering Yale at this point. Any opinions?

Comments (109)

  • confusedIB's picture

    At CBS, and I'll be very honest with you. There are a group of core feeder schools banks use to fill most of their associate class. Stern is definitely one of them. I would take Stern over the other two hands down if your goal is to break banking.

    And once recruiting starts, you'll be very happy you went with Stern. Scheduling informational interviews for each Friday and spending Thursday and Friday nights commuting to the city from Boston/New Haven is going to be a bitch. Doing that process while in NYC is MUCH BETTER.

    Go with Stern for banking. For all else, go with Sloan. Don't even consider SOM.

  • Leonidas's picture

    Sloan>Yale>Stern. For all of Sloan's criticisms, it is still an M7, and a fantastic B-School. You won't have any trouble scoring BB IBD gigs out of MIT. Stern is fine, but since everyone at Stern will be gunning for Banking, you'll likely have your work cut out for you.

    EDIT: In light of Yale SOM Guy's post, Ive amended my preference.

    Calling Ron Paul an isolationist is like calling your neighbor a hermit because he doesn't come over to your property and break your windows.

  • In reply to confusedIB
    Vancouver Canucks 2011's picture

    confusedIB wrote:
    At CBS, and I'll be very honest with you. There are a group of core feeder schools banks use to fill most of their associate class. Stern is definitely one of them. I would take Stern over the other two hands down if your goal is to break banking.

    And once recruiting starts, you'll be very happy you went with Stern. Scheduling informational interviews for each Friday and spending Thursday and Friday nights commuting to the city from Boston/New Haven is going to be a bitch. Doing that process while in NYC is MUCH BETTER.

    Go with Stern for banking. For all else, go with Sloan. Don't even consider SOM.


    Sloan and Yale SOM are also core schools for virtually ever bulge-bracket bank out there.

    Also, to provide a counterpoint:
    The New York location is a blessing but it is also a curse. Given the proximity to all the banks, the standards are much higher - you pretty much are required to do a lot more informational interviews. There is a lot more competition / pressure from classmates who are constantly networking.

  • In reply to Vancouver Canucks 2011
    confusedIB's picture

    Vancouver Canucks 2011 wrote:
    confusedIB wrote:
    At CBS, and I'll be very honest with you. There are a group of core feeder schools banks use to fill most of their associate class. Stern is definitely one of them. I would take Stern over the other two hands down if your goal is to break banking.

    And once recruiting starts, you'll be very happy you went with Stern. Scheduling informational interviews for each Friday and spending Thursday and Friday nights commuting to the city from Boston/New Haven is going to be a bitch. Doing that process while in NYC is MUCH BETTER.

    Go with Stern for banking. For all else, go with Sloan. Don't even consider SOM.


    Sloan and Yale SOM are also core schools for virtually ever bulge-bracket bank out there.

    Also, to provide a counterpoint:
    The New York location is a blessing but it is also a curse. Given the proximity to all the banks, the standards are much higher - you pretty much are required to do a lot more informational interviews. There is a lot more competition / pressure from classmates who are constantly networking.

    Regarding SOM being a core school:

    I met with the head of recruiting for a BB and he told me flat out that SOM is a core school, but to fill out whatever spots are left behind by their main feeders (CBS/W/Booth...Stern). Stern's recruiting ends mid-Jan. I think SOM's ends later. I could be entirely wrong. Regardless, the point is the same. If you're doing banking, do Stern.

    Your point about informational interviews is a very good one. Last semester absolutely sucked. Doing 40 informational interviews is not fun, and it's not even an exceptional number - that's the norm. At the same time, however, you have so many touch points at a bank so the opportunity to learn and network is higher. And, I would rather take the subway to an informational interview on a M/T than waste my Thursday night traveling to NYC to prep for 8 informational interviews that I've got on Friday.

  • zardari's picture

    Totally agree with Vancouver. At Stern literally everyone wants to do banking and not everyone ends up getting a banking job. And life is miserable as Vancouver mentioned you are expected to network non stop. Sloan is a much better school - you will be with smarter group of people, you will get more opportunities while in school and in future, and you will simply have a better learning experience. I would pick Sloan > Yale > NYU. Although i dont have real data to back it up but based on what i have heard from NYU alums, NYU doesnt do too well in terms of number of people who want to do banking and the % actually getting the banking job. And the NYU location is actually a significant disadvantage in terms of a getting a solid business school experience. You do get a very good NYC experience though.

  • yhp2009's picture

    If you have background in IB and feel fairly confident that you can hold your own against your peers, then pick Sloan. Judging from their employment stats, their IB representation is fairly small... So you may have an advantage if you have a strong IB background. Looks to me that Sloan attracts alot of consultants and technology buffs. Easier to stand out as an IB guy there.

  • confusedIB's picture

    See if you can reach out to any current students/alums at Sloan and Stern. Ask them about banking employment stats. I am not sure if Sloan's employment reports reflect whether their class just doesn't go into banking or have limited spots/recruiting opportunities at banks. For instance, Moelis recruits at Stern, but not Sloan. I think the same goes for Evercore.

    Anyways, both are fantastic schools. Reach out to alums/students and let that help form your decision.

  • Yale SOM Guy's picture

    I am a current second-year at Yale SOM. Although it sounds like you are leaning towards Sloan and Stern, I just wanted to take this opportunity to at least clear up some misconceptions. Yale SOM's banking recruiting is extremely strong. In fact, it is Yale SOM's strongest area and on a per capita-basis, recruiting was better than that of almost all other schools. Last year, 40 out of 235 first-years completed investment banking internships and 30 of them did so at bulge bracket banks. On a percentage basis, I don't think you will see as many bulge bracket offers at any other school, considering Wharton has 850 students per year, Columbia has 650, Booth 600 and Stern has 400. This year and last, we were the feeder school to eight bulge bracket banks and a lot of boutiques.

    I honestly can tell you that banking recruiting will be a lot easier at Yale given that:
    1.) Every bank allocates a few spots to Yale SOM and some banks allocates the same number of spots to Yale as it does to much bigger schools. For example, Barclays Capital US gave Yale SOM 7 investment banking summer associates, which was the most out of all MBA programs. And all 7 all received full-time return offers, making Yale one of the only business school to receive an 100% offer rate at Barclays. Thus, you are essentially competing against a much smaller population as opposed to fighting it out for limited spots at bigger schools.
    2.)You won't be competing against as many hardcore finance kids as you would at Stern or Booth. A lot of people at Yale are actually pursuing non-finance and non-profit tracks. Furthermore, I have recruited against kids from other schools and they are cut-throat. You will really appreciate how nice and collegial everyone is at Yale, when it comes to recruiting.
    3.) We are the smallest of all top 15 schools and have a very loyal alumni-base. Based on almost all metrics, Tuck and Yale SOM's alumni are by far the most active and helpful. Whether it is recruiting or networking, Yale SOM alumnis will go to war for currents students and help out enormously. Moreover, I have been extremely surprised by how helpful powerful Yale undergrad alums. Many of them want to see Yale excel as an institution and have played an immense role in helping Yale's recruiting efforts. Last year, the captain of some of our school recruiting teams at various banks were actually Yale College alums.
    4.) Yale SOM doesn't have proper grades and we have grade non-disclosure on top of that. Stern has proper grades and so does Sloan. Both schools also report, if I am not mistaken. This is a huge factor as people will ask you for grades during interviews. If you are not comfortable juggling a lot of networking and academics at the same time, Yale SOM will be a lot more comfortable environment.

    I don't expect you to choose Yale SOM but wanted to at least provide a Yale SOM perspective so that other people can make an informed judgment in the future. I myself chose Yale SOM over other options, because of banking recruiting. I love this place and the school has exceeded all my expectations. Good luck with your decision!

  • In reply to Yale SOM Guy
    confusedIB's picture

    Yale SOM Guy wrote:
    I am a current second-year at Yale SOM. Although it sounds like you are leaning towards Sloan and Stern, I just wanted to take this opportunity to at least clear up some misconceptions. Yale SOM's banking recruiting is extremely strong. In fact, it is Yale SOM's strongest area and on a per capita-basis, recruiting was better than that of almost all other schools. Last year, 40 out of 235 first-years completed investment banking internships and 30 of them did so at bulge bracket banks. On a percentage basis, I don't think you will see as many bulge bracket offers at any other school, considering Wharton has 850 students per year, Columbia has 650, Booth 600 and Stern has 400. This year and last, we were the feeder school to eight bulge bracket banks and a lot of boutiques.

    I honestly can tell you that banking recruiting will be a lot easier at Yale given that:
    1.) Every bank allocates a few spots to Yale SOM and some banks allocates the same number of spots to Yale as it does to much bigger schools. For example, Barclays Capital US gave Yale SOM 7 investment banking summer associates, which was the most out of all MBA programs. And all 7 all received full-time return offers, making Yale one of the only business school to receive an 100% offer rate at Barclays. Thus, you are essentially competing against a much smaller population as opposed to fighting it out for limited spots at bigger schools.
    2.)You won't be competing against as many hardcore finance kids as you would at Stern or Booth. A lot of people at Yale are actually pursuing non-finance and non-profit tracks. Furthermore, I have recruited against kids from other schools and they are cut-throat. You will really appreciate how nice and collegial everyone is at Yale, when it comes to recruiting.
    3.) We are the smallest of all top 15 schools and have a very loyal alumni-base. Based on almost all metrics, Tuck and Yale SOM's alumni are by far the most active and helpful. Whether it is recruiting or networking, Yale SOM alumnis will go to war for currents students and help out enormously. Moreover, I have been extremely surprised by how helpful powerful Yale undergrad alums. Many of them want to see Yale excel as an institution and have played an immense role in helping Yale's recruiting efforts. Last year, the captain of some of our school recruiting teams at various banks were actually Yale College alums.
    4.) Yale SOM doesn't have proper grades and we have grade non-disclosure on top of that. Stern has proper grades and so does Sloan. Both schools also report, if I am not mistaken. This is a huge factor as people will ask you for grades during interviews. If you are not comfortable juggling a lot of networking and academics at the same time, Yale SOM will be a lot more comfortable environment.

    I don't expect you to choose Yale SOM but wanted to at least provide a Yale SOM perspective so that other people can make an informed judgment in the future. I myself chose Yale SOM over other options, because of banking recruiting. I love this place and the school has exceeded all my expectations. Good luck with your decision!

    Great post.

  • In reply to yhp2009
    Yale SOM Guy's picture

    yhp2009 wrote:
    ^^^ You may have singlehandedly increased the number of next yrs applicants to SOM twofold.
    No grade is definite plus

    Haha. Thanks! I love Yale SOM and just wanted to at least share my personal, though biased (but still accurate), perspective.

    The grades factor is HUGE. People don't realize it now but this is a game-changer. Having grades will ruin (or at least severely affect) either your social life or recruiting. Not having to worry about grades and just being able to have fun has made my time here at blast. You literally have to try hard to get a fail here. I don't think I have heard of anyone failing a course here. But even if someone does, an employer will certainly not be able to know or find out.

  • confusedIB's picture

    ^^^ Dude, GND is solid, but isn't as helpful when it comes to recruiting. Either you bust your balls to hopefully make Dean's List or you're in the same boat as everyone else. And the interviews can get technical as hell with GND.. Lastly, for boutiques like BX/GHL, more preference is given to ex-bankers.

    After recruiting's done though, it's AMAZING. Whiskey every night. You'll need to work HARD to get below a B in your classes.

  • In reply to confusedIB
    Yale SOM Guy's picture

    confusedIB wrote:
    ^^^ Dude, GND is solid, but isn't as helpful when it comes to recruiting. Either you bust your balls to hopefully make Dean's List or you're in the same boat as everyone else. And the interviews can get technical as hell with GND.. Lastly, for boutiques like BX/GHL, more preference is given to ex-bankers.

    After recruiting's done though, it's AMAZING. Whiskey every night. You'll need to work HARD to get below a B in your classes.


    True, true. But you overestimate me :)

    I don't see myself as being particularly smart, motivated or hardworking. Getting an A in Accounting and Corporate Finance against other hardcore finance kids would be very tough. I have heard from friends at grade-disclosing schools that every banking interview consists of the banker asking them for grades in the first 10 mins of an interview. Apparently getting a B or lower in Accounting of Corporate Finance dooms one's chances of landing a banking offer. This scared the hell out of me. Thus, I think it is important for people to realize their strong and weak suits. For me, academics isn't one of my strengths so a GND school was crucial.

    P.S.: If even a schmuck like me can get a BB summer associate internship and full-time offer, it really ain't too hard for other guys at Yale SOM :)

  • In reply to Yale SOM Guy
    mikebrady's picture

    Yale SOM Guy wrote:
    I am a current second-year at Yale SOM. Although it sounds like you are leaning towards Sloan and Stern, I just wanted to take this opportunity to at least clear up some misconceptions. Yale SOM's banking recruiting is extremely strong. In fact, it is Yale SOM's strongest area and on a per capita-basis, recruiting was better than that of almost all other schools. Last year, 40 out of 235 first-years completed investment banking internships and 30 of them did so at bulge bracket banks. On a percentage basis, I don't think you will see as many bulge bracket offers at any other school, considering Wharton has 850 students per year, Columbia has 650, Booth 600 and Stern has 400. This year and last, we were the feeder school to eight bulge bracket banks and a lot of boutiques.

    I honestly can tell you that banking recruiting will be a lot easier at Yale given that:
    1.) Every bank allocates a few spots to Yale SOM and some banks allocates the same number of spots to Yale as it does to much bigger schools. For example, Barclays Capital US gave Yale SOM 7 investment banking summer associates, which was the most out of all MBA programs. And all 7 all received full-time return offers, making Yale one of the only business school to receive an 100% offer rate at Barclays. Thus, you are essentially competing against a much smaller population as opposed to fighting it out for limited spots at bigger schools.
    2.)You won't be competing against as many hardcore finance kids as you would at Stern or Booth. A lot of people at Yale are actually pursuing non-finance and non-profit tracks. Furthermore, I have recruited against kids from other schools and they are cut-throat. You will really appreciate how nice and collegial everyone is at Yale, when it comes to recruiting.
    3.) We are the smallest of all top 15 schools and have a very loyal alumni-base. Based on almost all metrics, Tuck and Yale SOM's alumni are by far the most active and helpful. Whether it is recruiting or networking, Yale SOM alumnis will go to war for currents students and help out enormously. Moreover, I have been extremely surprised by how helpful powerful Yale undergrad alums. Many of them want to see Yale excel as an institution and have played an immense role in helping Yale's recruiting efforts. Last year, the captain of some of our school recruiting teams at various banks were actually Yale College alums.
    4.) Yale SOM doesn't have proper grades and we have grade non-disclosure on top of that. Stern has proper grades and so does Sloan. Both schools also report, if I am not mistaken. This is a huge factor as people will ask you for grades during interviews. If you are not comfortable juggling a lot of networking and academics at the same time, Yale SOM will be a lot more comfortable environment.

    I don't expect you to choose Yale SOM but wanted to at least provide a Yale SOM perspective so that other people can make an informed judgment in the future. I myself chose Yale SOM over other options, because of banking recruiting. I love this place and the school has exceeded all my expectations. Good luck with your decision!

    The only merit this post has is for Yale info. 7 offers from Barclays the most of any school? yeah right. I know a handful of schools that had more offers than 7. They also got those numbers, shall we say residual numbers, because all the other schools are turning down Barclays. My school had 9-10 offers and only a few accepted because most people went to better banks. Barclay's isn't a good proxy and sure they had 100% acceptance rate only because other schools don't have them high up on the list. SOM alum will go to war but the problem is the representation at the higher levels do not come from SOM. I have met plenty of MDs at all the banks and never met anyone from SOM. Not to say that there aren't any but the same schools keep popping up time and time again. HBS, CBS, NYU, Tuck, Chicago, and even Kellogg. With that being said I think Yale is a great school but unfortunately it is not well regarded because it hasn't been as great as some of the older players. Give it time. The question is, do you want to wait?

  • Leonidas's picture

    Yale SOM Guy, I didn't know Yale Undergrads were eager to help SOMers. I always got the impression that SOM was treated like the red headed step-child of the Yale family. Seems like Dean Snyder really is a miracle worker.

    But as of now, among it's Graduate Schools, only the Law School is Top-5. So OP is better off with Sloan.

    Calling Ron Paul an isolationist is like calling your neighbor a hermit because he doesn't come over to your property and break your windows.

  • In reply to mikebrady
    Yale SOM Guy's picture

    mikebrady wrote:
    The only merit this post has is for Yale info. 7 offers from Barclays the most of any school? yeah right. I know a handful of schools that had more offers than 7. They also got those numbers, shall we say residual numbers, because all the other schools are turning down Barclays. My school had 9-10 offers and only a few accepted because most people went to better banks. Barclay's isn't a good proxy and sure they had 100% acceptance rate only because other schools don't have them high up on the list. SOM alum will go to war but the problem is the representation at the higher levels do not come from SOM. I have met plenty of MDs at all the banks and never met anyone from SOM. Not to say that there aren't any but the same schools keep popping up time and time again. HBS, CBS, NYU, Tuck, Chicago, and even Kellogg. With that being said I think Yale is a great school but unfortunately it is not well regarded because it hasn't been as great as some of the older players.

    12 offers made by Barclays Capital US to Yale SOM. 7 from Yale SOM ended up going there.
    Yale SOM, which sent 7 (and also one more to BarCap UK) ended up being school that had the most summer associates at Barclays Capital.

    I don't know whom you have met so I cannot comment on your second point.

  • Yale SOM Guy's picture

    This is for internship data for last year (since I am a second-year). And this is all for US investment banking, btw.
    -GS = 4 offers made, 3 accepted. 3 full-time offers extended.
    -MS = 3 offers made, 2 accepted. 2 full-time offers extended
    -JPM = 5 offers made, 4 accepted. 3 full-time offers extended
    This is pretty impressive considering that Yale SOM had 235 students our year and only about 40 people who were seriously pursuing investment banking.

    How about your school? Where did you go and what was your GS/MS/JPM breakdown?

  • confusedIB's picture

    those are good numbers, but tough to compare since recruiting classes are different sizes.

    Yeah BarCap had a bad year last year here, too. 10+ offers, 1 accept. this year tho, their class is 9-10 kids.

    Anyways, great info for the OP. Again, talk to alums/second years.

  • In reply to Yale SOM Guy
    zardari's picture

    Yale SOM Guy wrote:
    This is for internship data for last year (since I am a second-year). And this is all for US investment banking, btw.
    -GS = 4 offers made, 3 accepted. 3 full-time offers extended.
    -MS = 3 offers made, 2 accepted. 2 full-time offers extended
    -JPM = 5 offers made, 4 accepted. 3 full-time offers extended
    This is pretty impressive considering that Yale SOM had 235 students our year and only about 40 people who were seriously pursuing investment banking.

    How about your school? Where did you go and what was your GS/MS/JPM breakdown?

    seems about 40 people at SOM were interested in banking and almost all of them got banking jobs most at BBs. At NYU my guess would be that 200+ people were serious about banking and probably 100 or so got banking jobs.
    Sloan probably had similar success rate as SOM but Sloan is obviously a better ranked school and lot more people get multiple offers. I know Sloan's recruiting overall is not as strong as its top competitors CBS, Wharton, Booth, Kellogg but without any doubt they place better than NYU and SOM.
    a lot of people who go to yale are interested in non-profit and a lot of people who end up at sloan are interested in entrepreneurship/technology. competition for banking jobs is much less and the success rate is very high.

    At the end of the day if you are in the top 90% at sloan or som you will likely get a banking job. at stern you will probably need to be above average (top 50%) to get a banking job and you will need to work much harder for it. And at NYU your learning experience would be more uni-dimensional.
    If you are a rockstar you will get multiple offers whichever of the 3 you pick so why not go with the best ranked school.

  • IBeinhopeful's picture

    ^not sure if I agree with this. 200+ kids into banking dude? C'mon. At CBS (and we have 550 kids), 80 wanted to do banking. Def not 200 at stern. That's a ridiculous number. I have many buds at stern and none of them is going for banking. C'mon man.

  • IBeinhopeful's picture

    550 per class (not including J-termers).

    Again, NO WAY IN HELL 200 kids from stern going into banking. Stern's class is ~400. So you're telling me that OVER HALF of them want banking? Out of 550 kids here, 80 want banking. That's less than 20%. Apply even 30% to stern's class and that's 120 kids.

    Please don't make statement like that. I don't even go there and I found that offensive.

  • john1234's picture

    I wrote this before about two months ago but still applies:

    I go to MIT Sloan and am heading into banking. I'll try to give as unbiased opinions on IBD recruiting as possible but take what I say with a grain of salt.

    The school has both an incredible financial history and current presence: Merton, Modigliani, Black, Scholes, Asquith, Meyers, Fisher, Johnson, Lo etc. etc. This may not mean much to IBD recruiters but there are some excellent classes in finance. MIT has, without any question, the best economics department in the world. This transfers over to the finance and business school in some regards as we share the same building. There are two nobel prize winners actively teaching in the business school (Diamond & Merton) as well as other legendary figures (Myers, Ross, Cox, Lo, Johnson, et al).

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-01-12/rescuing-...

    About 40 students of the 400 student class actively recruit for banking. All of the banks recruit on-campus and the competition for the 20 first round interview slots of each bank is pretty light. Around 30 students landed investment banking internships last year. The other 10 probably ended up in IM or consulting jobs.

    Alumni presence in various banks is light which can be good and bad. They are not getting barraged by 100+ students but there are fewer contacts to make a connection with. The alumni presence in West Coast tech is huge for Sloan. Students made one or two trips out there last year and this year. I didn't go but I believe the GS office has 8+ MIT bankers.

    The finance club at MIT is one of the top three clubs at Sloan (behind tech & management consulting I think). The process for leading students through IBD recruiting is very polished: free WTS training, resume reviews, interview prep, organized on-campus bank presentations, and NYC banking day. That club is really, really great.

    A great finance club makes up for a slightly lackluster career office. MIT Sloan has made a strong commitment to tech (Google, Facebook. LinkedIn, Zynga, blah blah blah) which takes resources away from banking.

    There is a large MIT PE Symposium every year which is the total extent of PE official presence on-campus. Students who head to Apollo, Blackstone, etc. come from prior PE or banking experience. There are also IM and CFO conferences.

    The social scene of Sloan is pretty active and, like most business schools, involves a lot of partying. Every Wednesday the school heads to BHP (Beacon Hill Pub) and every Thursday there is free booze at C-Functions. Weekends continue the boozing. I played rugby in undergrad at a "Southern Ivy" and am drinking the same amount now as I did back then.

  • mikebrady's picture

    ^^ I agree with regards to sloan. This is the problem with schools like Yale trying to get out of the "nonprofit" classification and rebranding as a finance school. If a good finance school is directly related to number of IB positions then Yale is average. Yale places about the same if not worse in IBD than other non-finance schools. There is nothing unique about a path from Yale to IB. A similar path exists at any other top school. They don't place as well in anything else. Consulting. You don't go to Yale. General Management. Not Yale. Marketing not Yale. Nonprofit, okay Yale. Finance. Not Yale because you have similar if not better opportunities at other schools that are not considered finance schools. Operations Management. Not Yale. PE/VC not Yale. Brand management. Not Yale. Did I miss something? Maybe the dean will change things up but saying go to Yale because your chances are better for IB positions may be somewhat true, but the 10 schools ranked above it place just as well if not better.

  • In reply to yhp2009
    cphbravo96's picture

    yhp2009 wrote:
    If you have background in IB and feel fairly confident that you can hold your own against your peers, then pick Sloan. Judging from their employment stats, their IB representation is fairly small... So you may have an advantage if you have a strong IB background. Looks to me that Sloan attracts alot of consultants and technology buffs. Easier to stand out as an IB guy there.

    This.

    Regards

    "The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant, it's just that they know so much that isn't so."
    - Ronald Reagan

  • In reply to Leonidas
    Yale SOM Guy's picture

    Leonidas wrote:
    Yale SOM Guy, I didn't know Yale Undergrads were eager to help SOMers. I always got the impression that SOM was treated like the red headed step-child of the Yale family. Seems like Dean Snyder really is a miracle worker.

    But as of now, among it's Graduate Schools, only the Law School is Top-5. So OP is better off with Sloan.


    You would be very positively surprised. Last year, Yale SOM's two biggest donations were from two Yale College alums, Ned Evans and Wilbur Ross. Evans donated $50 million and Ross donated $10 million. Many of our top notch professors are also Yale College alums, such as Jim Chanos (the famous hedge fund manager) or Andrew Metrick (who came over from Wharton, where he was rated Wharton Professor of the Year three years in a row before he came to yale SOM). Also, from a recruiting standpoint, Yale College alums were very helpful. The two heads of our Barclays team are Yale College and Yale Law alums while the heads of our Goldman team are also two Yale College alums. Yale SOM's PE and hedge fund recruting is also strong as a result of our Yale College connections. Going back to the two previously mentioned alums for example, students this year and last recruited successfully into Wilbur Ross' PE fund as well as Chano's Kynikos Associates hedge fund.

    Even if most Yale College alums don't necessarily care about Yale SOM, the ones who do are very influential and have played an enormous impact in benefitting Yale SOM as well as Yale as an institution. Ted Snyder's goal is to really leverage Yale University's name and make Yale SOM the business school that is the most integrated with its parent university. Wharton is very separated from UPenn and HBS is almost completely segregated from the rest of Harvard. Snyder wants to make sure that Yale SOM is intentionally branded as a part of Yale and that SOM students have both the resources of SOM and Yale.

    This interplay between Yale SOM and Yale University is what has been making SOM strong in the last few years. For instance, out of all of the business schools, Yale students have the most flexibility in choosing non-business school classes. So instead of a purely-MBA education, our business school students have the breadth of Yale University / other graduate study courses. Taking a Yale College / law school or divinity or forestry school course is extremely easy and even encouraged. Lastly given Yale's strong brand name, we attract some of the best speakers on earth every year and all these events are open to Yale SOM students. Outside of Harvard and maybe Stanford, no institution worldwide attracts the same calibre speakers and visitors as Yale. This is something that really gives Yale SOM students an edge.

  • Comebackkid's picture

    OP, I am in a similar situation (Booth vs Stern) and am leaning toward Stern. I would strongly suggest you speak with students, alumni and spend time at the school. Stern was my backup and after touring the schools I starting to change my mind. A few points:

    1. All these schools can lead to banking if your well prepared - I would pick the one your best suited for;
    2. Yes, Stern students are expected to be more prepared; however, they ARE more prepared. If you want a long term career in banking.....spending time networking and learning finance from the first day of your MBA will pay off later;
    3. You will learn more about other finance careers options at Stern. Not just graduate recruitment programs;
    4. SOM and Sloan will likely provide you with a broader network (more potential clients late in your career) .

    Disclosure - I am not planning to enter IB and I have funding from Stern

  • In reply to Leonidas
    monkeyc's picture

    Leonidas wrote:
    Sloan>Yale>Stern. For all of Sloan's criticisms, it is still an M7, and a fantastic B-School. You won't have any trouble scoring BB IBD gigs out of MIT. Stern is fine, but since everyone at Stern will be gunning for Banking, you'll likely have your work cut out for you.

    EDIT: In light of Yale SOM Guy's post, Ive amended my preference.

    if you want to look at buyside, sloan is actually thought of pretty highly. part of this is the boston boys club, part of this is stern being full of IB gunners.

  • BigBucks's picture

    Bernankey that is wrong, 1 yr MSF no w/e u are starting as analyst....
    So far the break down is like this:

    If u wanna chill and still have a very good shot at banking (Yale)
    If think you can outshine your peers and are hungry to display that (NYU)
    MIT is a mixture of the aforementioned attributes

    personally, I would pick Yale, but, what can I say? I am a bit of a slacker

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