11/10/12

I graduated last May, which means I've been in my current job for about 5 months. Suffice to say I hate it. I'm at a boutique consulting firm in a pretty small town (not super small but definitely no NYC or Chicago or even Boston/Houston). Dealflow ("engagement flow"?) isn't bad. But...
--consulting wasn't my top choice (ultimately not what i'm really interested in)
--I dislike the work environment (not much interaction with colleagues, career advancement prospects are low, etcc.)
--I would like to move out of this town asap

I have always been trying for investment banking (summered at a boutique) but didn't get an FT offer so I accepted my second choice (consulting) thinking that I would like it, I tried it for nearly half a year, and I really want to go back to ibanking.

So my questions are....
--Would it look bad to quit after only 6 months?
--I know I would be joining IB as an analyst, which firms are okay with this move? I know some firms only hire at specific points (graduating senior undergrad, graduating MBA, or after 2/3 years in IB as a pre-MBA)
--On my resume it looks like I am flipflopping a lot, going from IB to consulting and back, how do I convince the banks that I really do want to be in IB?

thanks!

Comments (10)

11/9/12

Just do it, it's not as big a deal as ebveryone makes out. If you switch within 6 months 3 or 4 times then yes, but to do it once or twice, early in your career is not a big deal.

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11/9/12

Agree with newfirst; Its not a big deal. However, realize that the last 6 months were wasted and consider yourself 6 months behind. If you stay for 2-3 years you may be going for a senior analyst or associate position somewhere. Now you will be effectively starting over on the 2-3 year track.

I cannot speak for everone everywhere, but I do have experience in small(er) cities.

This:

looks like I am flipflopping a lot, going from IB to consulting and back

Does not look like flip-flopping to me and makes your story on why you want to leave really easy (I have a good job and still want IB). Most small city boutiques actually prefer a small amount of previous work experience and your previous summer intership will also bode well for you.

I cannot comment on how BB banks would view your background (my guess is negatively) but I would bet you have a good shot at boutique/regional banks that staff a few analysts/associates.

Also, DO NOT QUIT, rather resign after you have another offer.

Final Advice: Be absolutely sure you like IB better than consulting. You will not be able to go back for as long as you have that 6 months on your resume. Consider that you may be getting the 6 month jitters; Work sucks my man you will just have to get used to it.

11/9/12

If you want IB then make sure you have a job offer first before you leave. It's good that you recognize you want out of consulting soon rather than 2-3 years in it. You have a great excuse for leaving. You realized that your experience at the boutique IB was a lot better and consulting isn't for you. Boom

In reply to blackjack21
11/10/12
blackjack21:

If you want IB then make sure you have a job offer first before you leave. It's good that you recognize you want out of consulting soon rather than 2-3 years in it. You have a great excuse for leaving. You realized that your experience at the boutique IB was a lot better and consulting isn't for you. Boom

But won't they call up my current employers for recs or bg check? When I was interviewing for consulting I made it sound like I really wanted consulting over IB (I needed a job!) but doesn't it seem a bit 2-faced now?
Glad to hear it's probably not too big of a deal, but do I go about recruiting off-cycle? Cold-emails again? Or would I basically be pitted against current FT candidates right now?

11/10/12
MaximA:

I graduated last May, which means I've been in my current job for about 5 months. Suffice to say I hate it. I'm at a boutique consulting firm in a pretty small town (not super small but definitely no NYC or Chicago or even Boston/Houston). Dealflow ("engagement flow"?) isn't bad. But...
--consulting wasn't my top choice (ultimately not what i'm really interested in)
--I dislike the work environment (not much interaction with colleagues, career advancement prospects are low, etcc.)
--I would like to move out of this town asap

I have always been trying for investment banking (summered at a boutique) but didn't get an FT offer so I accepted my second choice (consulting) thinking that I would like it, I tried it for nearly half a year, and I really want to go back to ibanking.

So my questions are....
--Would it look bad to quit after only 6 months?
--I know I would be joining IB as an analyst, which firms are okay with this move? I know some firms only hire at specific points (graduating senior undergrad, graduating MBA, or after 2/3 years in IB as a pre-MBA)
--On my resume it looks like I am flipflopping a lot, going from IB to consulting and back, how do I convince the banks that I really do want to be in IB?

thanks!

In a similar position myself...

How do you get along with your coworkers/boss? Would you ask them for a recommendation when you leave? I'm debating this myself ATM.

In reply to John Rolfe
11/10/12
<a href=http://tinyurl.com/3zap9yh rel=nofollow>John Rolfe</a>:

In a similar position myself...
How do you get along with your coworkers/boss? Would you ask them for a recommendation when you leave? I'm debating this myself ATM.

Relieved I'm not the only one. I've been asking the same questions, I actually get along fine with my coworkers and boss, but due to the culture of the firm I don't get to see many of them most of the time (travel, lots of people work from home offices, etcc.) I have a feeling that if I leave it may be a bad thing since I still haven't made any strong connections with people, so leaving may be seen as more of a eff you move than anything.

In reply to MaximA
11/10/12
MaximA:
blackjack21:

If you want IB then make sure you have a job offer first before you leave. It's good that you recognize you want out of consulting soon rather than 2-3 years in it. You have a great excuse for leaving. You realized that your experience at the boutique IB was a lot better and consulting isn't for you. Boom

But won't they call up my current employers for recs or bg check? When I was interviewing for consulting I made it sound like I really wanted consulting over IB (I needed a job!) but doesn't it seem a bit 2-faced now?
Glad to hear it's probably not too big of a deal, but do I go about recruiting off-cycle? Cold-emails again? Or would I basically be pitted against current FT candidates right now?

Just say you realized 6 months in that consulting wasn't for you. Initially, you were passionate about it, but then saw after 6 months on the job that consulting isn't your thing. The employers could call them up just to verify that you actually worked there. Recs are a separate thing. That's up to you. They can be written or via phone call.

At this point, use your contacts and if you don't have any useful ones then start cold-emailing/trolling LinkedIn.

11/11/12

Thanks, that helps!
Anyone else have any insight?

7/17/13

Sorry to resurrect this thread but I'm wondering how early is too early to start applying for other jobs.

I'm in my first month of my first job (yeah I know this is a bad start) and I found another opportunity that I think I am very qualified for, and would be a huge step up from my current position.

Is there reputational danger of applying too early? Would the new bank take me seriously, or would they laugh and possibly black list me (or even call my current boss)?

Silly question I know. But I would appreciate some comments

In reply to therealslimmonkey
7/19/13

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