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Hey guys, looking for some advice. So I've been knocking on a few doors recently by making early morning drop ins which is a great experience btw. While doing my research of firms, I became more focused on understanding the strategies and culture (boutique and medium sized firms) which has helped preparing the resume and cover letter for the firms.

Have a question regarding two walk-ins I'm planning: I noticed at one firm that not only is the VP overlooking HR an alumni of my uni, but so is over a third of the IM and PWM team. At the other firm, VP of HR is also an alumni and about half the analysts. What is the best way to approach and utilize from the alumni connection or is it something they will notice or bring up on their own if felt appropriate? All this assuming I get a face to face but advice regarding email/cl would be helpful as well.

Cheers,

T

4 1

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Comments (99)

  • In reply to JustNumbers
    DJBanker's picture

    JustNumbers:
    I can agree with the OP 100%. It takes some guts, but the ability to react quickly and say something to somebody who you want to help you, without looking stupid, is an incredible talent that only comes with practice.

    I am graduate from a completely non-target and was looking to break into the industry. Because I couldn't find out online what boutiques were in town, I literally started walking around downtown looking in each building's directory for the words "capital", "asset", "fund", "equity", or "investors" in the name. Also, it's naive, but I was determined to work in the tallest building on the top floor (still am) since that real estate is pricey and you'd have to be a solid name to occupy it. I spent the evening researching the companies found, discovering who I should speak with, and preparing an elevator speech.

    One piece of advice that worked for me: Don't go to the lobby and ask, when there are multiple floors that the company occupies. You'll get direction to apply online. Instead find the floor that the department you are targeting is on, and knock on the door. I did this when I was looking to land a credit analyst position. I said I was little lost trying to locate HR to drop a resume, when I found out that the guy who answered the door was a Sr. Analyst. We chatted for a few minutes and then he took my resume down to HR for me. I was called later that next day to come in for an interview. Hired about a week later.

    I didn't know anyone else did this, so major props to the OP!

    "How do you get into a company you really want to work for?.....Right through the front door." - Anonymous WSO Monkey

    Thanks for the props once again. I agree with what you've said and I'm applying the same strategy. I would add "securities" to the list of firm titles but I'm sure you did that as well. Definitely don't ask the security ppl unless the talk to u first. Like MissNG said, act like this is how it goes down. Regarding research and preparing pitches, I do the same but sometimes I'll see a firm and walk in. I would much rather do my research, pick a few key firms, be knowledgeable about their products/departments/strategy/culture etc. and if/when asked what I am interested in doing, mention the specific department rather than saying "anything" or "analyst". I'm not saying this will get you a job (I am still hunting) but I feel more confident if I know the securities firm has a s&t dept. vs an IM firm which has PMs managing pooled funds/assets/products etc. I like your last piece of advice, a lot. I don't think I will ever apply for a position online or via email as the initial attempt.

  • In reply to MissNG
    DJBanker's picture

    MissNG:
    DJBanker:
    MissNG:
    I did that too; as long as you dont look uncomfortable (at all. walk in as if thats how it works), the person you meet (if all goes well; which surprisingly often it does) is just as surprised as the previous posters that someone would have the guts to do that, that they end up listening for longer than they intended, and if you can get their intention during that moment... then, well, bob's your uncle

    doing that nice and early tmrw.

    Ugh, I said 'intention' instead of 'attention'. I never mismatch rhyming words. I blame the glass of scotch I had last night.

    Lol, yeah I wasn't clear headed myself last night... U never finished your story. What was the result of your walk ins btw? I'm assuming bob is your uncle now?

  • In reply to DJBanker
    Mcom's picture

    So let's say you've done your homework on this company, and you are very impressed and want to there with absolute determination. But when you arrived to the building, you've come to realized there's security at front desk that needs ID pass to get to elevators. How would you come about in getting through that? If not, what's your tactic or would you suggest doing?

    I feel this would be a better piece to be on CNBC than the previous article about dating Wall st guys.

    DJbanker You deserve this line : "This is the kid. Calls me 59 days in a row, wants to be a player. Oughta be a picture of you in the dictionary under 'Persistence', kid." --Gekko

    All warfare is based on deception. - Art of War

  • soules9219's picture

    Haha bro I am rooting for you keep up the good work,

    I just sent you a message I hope you read, I think we can help each other

    Coming from a non-target with a not so great GPA I'm ready to start pounding the pavement like you once I get back to Boston. Have had success cold-calling, but am waiting out on doing it on investment banks (BB, MM, boutiques) compiling a list to get ready to hit the road .

    First will send an email --> Likely call make some execuse like the MD told me to call can you please connect me through :) --> If it goes well or not well I'll still physically go to the office and ask to talk to someone in recruiting.

    Not only is this effective but for me its fun haha

    In fact I would be willing to march into 200 West and say "I'm here to see Lloyd" lol

    Keep up the good work man you will land something you want very soon :)

  • In reply to DJBanker
    SirTradesaLot's picture

    DJBanker:
    SirTradesaLot:
    I love this.

    Any more advice? Your tactic on staying persistent worked well this morning. How should I deal with the firms/contacts who have a copy of my resume (prior to our discussion)?


    Why don't you just try showing up there again and either get a meeting on the spot or schedule one while you're there? That seems to be working for you.

    adapt or die:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • In reply to DJBanker
    MissNG's picture

    DJBanker:
    MissNG:
    DJBanker:
    MissNG:
    I did that too; as long as you dont look uncomfortable (at all. walk in as if thats how it works), the person you meet (if all goes well; which surprisingly often it does) is just as surprised as the previous posters that someone would have the guts to do that, that they end up listening for longer than they intended, and if you can get their intention during that moment... then, well, bob's your uncle

    doing that nice and early tmrw.

    Ugh, I said 'intention' instead of 'attention'. I never mismatch rhyming words. I blame the glass of scotch I had last night.

    Lol, yeah I wasn't clear headed myself last night... U never finished your story. What was the result of your walk ins btw? I'm assuming bob is your uncle now?

    Bob was my uncle for a while; and then I discovered he was in fact only a close friend...

    In other words; the walk in was successful but it was just after my architecture degree. Jobs were hard to come by, or rather responses to anything emailed were hard to come by. I did not want to email drawings that it had taken me hundreds of hours to complete; hence the development of the balls to walk in with my cv and portfolio. After getting what I thought I wanted, I discovered I love drawing, buildings and architecture but as a career, in so many ways, it just wasnt what I thought it was. I'm not really a clearly left or right brained person; the things I enjoy/am good at vary between sides and deciding what to make a career from wasnt clear. (Erm I hope that didnt come across as ''boohoo I'm so talented' and you understand the spirit in which that was intended)

    Architecture is one of those careers that feels like 'a labour of love' in ways its difficult to explain; and the juice just wasnt worth the squeeze. If I'm going to sell out, and do money making projects in real estate development/marketing (studying for gmat and deciding) then I can do that and actually enjoy that; I dont not enjoy selling out and doing money making projects while hiding behind 'design' and a drawing board and calling it some thing else...

    "Dont compromise yourself; you're all you've got" - Janis Joplin

  • In reply to SirTradesaLot
    SymphonyBanker's picture

    SirTradesaLot:
    Beretta:
    Wow. Is for serious?

    You should walk into 200 West and say "I'm here to see Mr. Blankfein."


    Fuck it, why not? Probably more effective if you just call him Lloyd though.

    Just wanted to say LOL.

  • happypantsmcgee's picture

    I just don't see how this would work some places. You wouldn't get in the door here as security would stop you before you even had the chance to ask anyone, anything. I guess you said you're looking smaller places but still, I would think the building itself would have some sort of security in place?

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • In reply to Mcom
    SymphonyBanker's picture

    Just wanted to say:

    1. This is an immensely useful thread. Absolutely trying this; I've been feeling stuck for a while. And,

    2: Same question as above:

    Mcom:
    But when you arrived to the building, you've come to realized there's security at front desk that needs ID pass to get to elevators. How would you come about in getting through that? If not, what's your tactic or would you suggest doing?
  • In reply to SymphonyBanker
    MissNG's picture

    SymphonyBanker:
    Just wanted to say:

    1. This is an immensely useful thread. Absolutely trying this; I've been feeling stuck for a while. And,

    2: Same question as above:

    Mcom:
    But when you arrived to the building, you've come to realized there's security at front desk that needs ID pass to get to elevators. How would you come about in getting through that? If not, what's your tactic or would you suggest doing?

    Try this...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0uyIWOU024

    On a serious note there is a lot to be said for coming in with purpose; like you hadnt considered the possibility of being stopped (not looking around waiting for the moment when you are). Being confident, well dressed and well spoken goes a very long way; and at the end of the day, they arent expecting somebody to do this; so theyre simply not watching out for it = you can get so much further thank you think. Try it; I really would recommend it.

    "Dont compromise yourself; you're all you've got" - Janis Joplin

  • In reply to SymphonyBanker
    MissNG's picture

    SymphonyBanker:
    Just wanted to say:

    1. This is an immensely useful thread. Absolutely trying this; I've been feeling stuck for a while. And,

    2: Same question as above:

    Mcom:
    But when you arrived to the building, you've come to realized there's security at front desk that needs ID pass to get to elevators. How would you come about in getting through that? If not, what's your tactic or would you suggest doing?

    SymphonyBanker, sorry, didnt answer your question. This seems the time to mention a name if you have one... I said: 'I have an unconfirmed appointment with x; if he is not expecting me I need to go in and make another app with his pa.' Risky, a few things can go wrong (it will always be risky) - but this approach has a lot to do with delivery, not so much what you say (as far as getting in to the building/speaking to pa). You drop a quick line to move forward to reception, not to give security time/opportunity to dissect your reason. Youre not waiting for approval, youre telling them why youre going in (obviously polite, assertive, brief). ('x' was a college alum; which worded properly to pa, could get you phone app/direct email) It was in a different field, mid-sized firm; how different can the formula be? Again, there is some risk; you have to get over that. I'd rather take an all or nothing gamble than drop my cv into an ocean of them.

    "Dont compromise yourself; you're all you've got" - Janis Joplin

  • IvyLeagueVet's picture

    Way to take initiative and be proactive about your job search.

    Many people don't have the balls to do this and balls will get you pretty far because every decision in finance is based on risk so golf clap to you. Which begs the question why more non targets don't try to break into Risk and go from there, especially since this website is 99% of non target students or grads. Anyways...

    When you drop your resume, follow up. You must have gotten a name so you have their email address. Start there, if you get NDRs, there is finite # of email address combinations so keep trying. Hit on some points about your conversation with him/her. Many people overlook this, but every interaction is an interview so make it memorable. One off the cuff comment can lead to a small detail that you can reference in an email for the follow up. Those small details show that you're locked in, you pay attention and you pick up things that others don't, you can see clearly through the fog.

    Most successful people in finance have great memories and they will remember the little things, attention to detail. You'd be surprised how useful it is.

    As for the people looking for guidance on how to circumvent security at the front, if you can't figure that one out, then you have no business in finance. Figure it out...

  • In reply to Mcom
    DJBanker's picture

    Mcom:
    So let's say you've done your homework on this company, and you are very impressed and want to there with absolute determination. But when you arrived to the building, you've come to realized there's security at front desk that needs ID pass to get to elevators. How would you come about in getting through that? If not, what's your tactic or would you suggest doing?

    I feel this would be a better piece to be on CNBC than the previous article about dating Wall st guys.

    DJbanker You deserve this line : "This is the kid. Calls me 59 days in a row, wants to be a player. Oughta be a picture of you in the dictionary under 'Persistence', kid." --Gekko

    As far as the security question, I would suggest using MissNG's tactic or improvise. There is no set formula in dealing with this issue - you have to understand, I am dressed in a suit (that fits me properly), am clean, walk with confidence, have a portfolio in my hand with copies of my transcript, resume, past papers and now will include some random white papers as well. If you walk into Goldman's or KKR, then go for it. I personally like the boutique/mm feel and like I said, I don't live in a town my any means (think San Fran, Chicago, Minn/St. Paul) so it boils down to ure preference.

  • In reply to SirTradesaLot
    DJBanker's picture

    SirTradesaLot:
    DJBanker:
    SirTradesaLot:
    I love this.

    Any more advice? Your tactic on staying persistent worked well this morning. How should I deal with the firms/contacts who have a copy of my resume (prior to our discussion)?


    Why don't you just try showing up there again and either get a meeting on the spot or schedule one while you're there? That seems to be working for you.

    Yup, I think with the Alumni I'm going to play it differently (regarding the original two firms I started this post about but for the other 50 firms lol I will drop in again.

  • In reply to happypantsmcgee
    DJBanker's picture

    happypantsmcgee:
    I just don't see how this would work some places. You wouldn't get in the door here as security would stop you before you even had the chance to ask anyone, anything. I guess you said you're looking smaller places but still, I would think the building itself would have some sort of security in place?

    It happens, it works and its effective. You have to be creative, confident and know what you want to say. I NEVER talk to security and the one or two times I did, they offered to call up and see if the person I wanted to see was available. I instead chose to call that person myself b/c I had their contact info and then set up a way for them to meet me downstairs to meet/submit resume. So I guess if you get stopped, just know who you are there to see at the firm. The buildings I walk into (like most major cities with a "street" or financial district) have around 30-50 floors wit 3-5 firms per floor. I am not blankly walking - I know where I am going. I am not guaranteeing myself a job, but these secretaries and office managers know who I am now.

  • In reply to DJBanker
    happypantsmcgee's picture

    DJBanker:
    happypantsmcgee:
    I just don't see how this would work some places. You wouldn't get in the door here as security would stop you before you even had the chance to ask anyone, anything. I guess you said you're looking smaller places but still, I would think the building itself would have some sort of security in place?

    It happens, it works and its effective. You have to be creative, confident and know what you want to say. I NEVER talk to security and the one or two times I did, they offered to call up and see if the person I wanted to see was available. I instead chose to call that person myself b/c I had their contact info and then set up a way for them to meet me downstairs to meet/submit resume. So I guess if you get stopped, just know who you are there to see at the firm. The buildings I walk into (like most major cities with a "street" or financial district) have around 30-50 floors wit 3-5 firms per floor. I am not blankly walking - I know where I am going. I am not guaranteeing myself a job, but these secretaries and office managers know who I am now.


    I guess my office is just different. You can even get to a secretary without talking to/passing through security first.

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • In reply to MissNG
    DJBanker's picture

    MissNG:
    SymphonyBanker:
    Just wanted to say:

    1. This is an immensely useful thread. Absolutely trying this; I've been feeling stuck for a while. And,

    2: Same question as above:

    Mcom:
    But when you arrived to the building, you've come to realized there's security at front desk that needs ID pass to get to elevators. How would you come about in getting through that? If not, what's your tactic or would you suggest doing?

    SymphonyBanker, sorry, didnt answer your question. This seems the time to mention a name if you have one... I said: 'I have an unconfirmed appointment with x; if he is not expecting me I need to go in and make another app with his pa.' Risky, a few things can go wrong (it will always be risky) - but this approach has a lot to do with delivery, not so much what you say (as far as getting in to the building/speaking to pa). You drop a quick line to move forward to reception, not to give security time/opportunity to dissect your reason. Youre not waiting for approval, youre telling them why youre going in (obviously polite, assertive, brief). ('x' was a college alum; which worded properly to pa, could get you phone app/direct email) It was in a different field, mid-sized firm; how different can the formula be? Again, there is some risk; you have to get over that. I'd rather take an all or nothing gamble than drop my cv into an ocean of them.

    Ditto. The one time I walked in and security stopped me, I said I was here to x who is blah blah. He told me unauthorized peeps can't go up and offered to call and see if she was int. I already had her number so called her and left a msg. She called me back 3o mins later, said she got my message and that making an appt. to see person y (whom she was exec assistant to) would be impossible that day - in retrospect, I should have set up an meeting for the next day or at least pushed her. Anyway, she was happy to come downstairs and quickly meet me. So she did and I pitched my pitch and that's that. No call back but that was Monday. Will follow up once I'm back from the trip.

  • In reply to IvyLeagueVet
    DJBanker's picture

    IvyLeagueVet:
    Way to take initiative and be proactive about your job search.

    Many people don't have the balls to do this and balls will get you pretty far because every decision in finance is based on risk so golf clap to you. Which begs the question why more non targets don't try to break into Risk and go from there, especially since this website is 99% of non target students or grads. Anyways...

    When you drop your resume, follow up. You must have gotten a name so you have their email address. Start there, if you get NDRs, there is finite # of email address combinations so keep trying. Hit on some points about your conversation with him/her. Many people overlook this, but every interaction is an interview so make it memorable. One off the cuff comment can lead to a small detail that you can reference in an email for the follow up. Those small details show that you're locked in, you pay attention and you pick up things that others don't, you can see clearly through the fog.

    Most successful people in finance have great memories and they will remember the little things, attention to detail. You'd be surprised how useful it is.

    As for the people looking for guidance on how to circumvent security at the front, if you can't figure that one out, then you have no business in finance. Figure it out...

    Thank you for the support and the tip. I am definitely going to email contacts after I have attempted a call first, except for contacts I have not approached yet and are alumni (this is my tactic). One thing I would add is keep the emails short. Don't write your life story in the email and how you always wanted this blah blah. Be direct and succinct. It's like a post I read here or somewhere - think of whether they'll quickly be able to scan you're email on a bb while walking to grab a coffee.

  • In reply to DJBanker
    IvyLeagueVet's picture

    DJBanker:
    IvyLeagueVet:
    Way to take initiative and be proactive about your job search.

    Many people don't have the balls to do this and balls will get you pretty far because every decision in finance is based on risk so golf clap to you. Which begs the question why more non targets don't try to break into Risk and go from there, especially since this website is 99% of non target students or grads. Anyways...

    When you drop your resume, follow up. You must have gotten a name so you have their email address. Start there, if you get NDRs, there is finite # of email address combinations so keep trying. Hit on some points about your conversation with him/her. Many people overlook this, but every interaction is an interview so make it memorable. One off the cuff comment can lead to a small detail that you can reference in an email for the follow up. Those small details show that you're locked in, you pay attention and you pick up things that others don't, you can see clearly through the fog.

    Most successful people in finance have great memories and they will remember the little things, attention to detail. You'd be surprised how useful it is.

    As for the people looking for guidance on how to circumvent security at the front, if you can't figure that one out, then you have no business in finance. Figure it out...

    Thank you for the support and the tip. I am definitely going to email contacts after I have attempted a call first, except for contacts I have not approached yet and are alumni (this is my tactic). One thing I would add is keep the emails short. Don't write your life story in the email and how you always wanted this blah blah. Be direct and succinct. It's like a post I read here or somewhere - think of whether they'll quickly be able to scan you're email on a bb while walking to grab a coffee.


    Yes, succinct is key. 9 times out of 10, you won't get a response from someone on their desk and if you do, it's short and everything is abbreviated. So when will you get a response? When someone is standing in line or catching up on email after the day or on the weekend. Those emails are from a smartphone device and the screen is small so get your point across in 2 -3 sentences max. Use the subject to save space and pitch from there too. "Introduction from uni with x GPA and captain of the balls team"

    Hi, I'm a recent grad from x with a y GPA. We are alums of uni and I'd to have a discussion to learn more about z. When are you available?

    Obviously the more attractive credentials, the better, but leave the BS to the side.

    Hi, I'm a recent grad from x with a y GPA and I'm scheduled to take the CFA Level 1 in z. You're an alumn and I'd to have a discussion to learn more about w. When are you available?

    or

    Hi, I'm a veteran and a recent grad from x with a y GPA and I'm scheduled to take the CFA Level 1 in z. I'd to have a discussion to learn more about w. When are you available?

    or

    Hi, I'm a recent grad from x with a y GPA and I was the captain of z college team. I'd to have a discussion to learn more about w. When are you available?

    Contrary to belief on this site and the numerous bullshit long winded "templates", no one really gives a shit. You're only wasting time. Instant gratification, so give it to me. Someone should be able to spend 10 seconds on your email and build a profile. Based on that profile, someone will know if you're even a candidate.

    X where you went to school
    Y Some skill that crosses well into finance and/or my specific biz
    Z 1 last nugget to show dedication and seriousness

    The BS about your passion for finance and/or some long winded story about your very short lived life is well bullshit and no one cares. I promise.

The WSO Advantage - Land Your Dream Job

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  • SirTradesaLot's picture

    So, how did it all turn out?

    adapt or die:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • DJBanker's picture

    Well I've been on a trip with family and got back to the city I live in (vs. the city where I was doing the walk ins) and have had to attend to some engagements here. Back on the hunt starting Monday. Have had increased activity on my LinkedIn profile but that could be due to a multitude of factors.

  • DJBanker's picture

    SirTradesaLot:
    So, how did it all turn out?

    Alright, update time. So, on the walk-in approach alone, so far I haven't heard much back. I got one very polite rejection letter in the mail from one of the firms. However, I think what I failed to notice was how much my interactions and interview skills have improved since being on my toes. Through other avenues, I have been interviewing and I've noticed a change in my presentation both on phone and in person. That said, the next steps for me are to make second rounds at some of the firms I liked during my initial visits. If there are openings I'm going to focus on them but I'm also open to going with the flow and being able to have a informative conversation with a decision maker. I've cleaned up my email approach as well thanks to IveyLeagueVeteran's suggestions. Should also buy another suit or more shirts at least!

  • DJBanker's picture

    So more updates as I move along...

    I did contact one of the alumni VPs.. sent an email and followed up according to plan via phone. Had a great conversation with her; learned about the firm and where things are going. Unfortunately she was a bit reluctant to mention anything about the hiring process or open roles, but that's mainly due to the fact the firm's been acquired and they are in a transition period. That being said, she offered to forward my email to the head office where recruiting takes place. So I guess not a complete blank. I will follow up on the other place tomorrow.

    Cheers,

    T

  • Don'tyoudoit's picture

    Any new updates on your walk-ins? My biggest piece of advice is to find something you have in common with a person there, then search that person out. I walked into a FA office looking for an internship last year, left with no internship, but a job offer to work in his office. I know it's not as hard as IB to get into, but the formula still works.

  • Febreeze's picture

    Interested in hearing how this is all going...

  • DJBanker's picture

    Hello Monkeys,

    I am sure some of you are curious as to my recent developments, and there have been a few. So let's begin:

    When I originally posted my question, I was very new to the concept of walking in, as I'm sure some of you can relate to. I received great feedback and advice which not only allowed me to craft my own strategy, but boosted my confidence as well. I knocked on quite a few doors; had a regimented schedule. Landed a few interviews, some informational while others employment related. Gained exposure to a variety of niches and roles along the way. Intellectually stimulated, emotionally challenged and painfully anxious at times would be how I describe my state. However, I did manage to learn about some interesting positions - one as Portfolio/Trading Analyst had 3 rounds of interviews, with no offer at the end. Second role in Advisor Distribution at a BB was a go but an issue occurred last minute and the offer was revoked - this was through networking. Third, in PWM at a boutique through old fashioned email resume and a similar role at a BB through networking. Finally, a role in Hedge Fund and PE due diligence.

    I was quite busy. Met a lot of people during the process and while attending CFA events, ran into a few of them there. All positive interactions - I enjoyed them actually. One of the roles I was referred to was through someone I met at an event while another was off LinkedIn. I am just sharing part of my strategy as I believe it is a customized and subjective process - in reality I was applying numerous tactics during the hunt.

    A well written resume and cover letter helped. The balls, that I apparently possess according to a few members, are without a doubt, necessary. Other people's advice is important but you have to tailor it to you're role and who you are as a professional (realistically; not who you think you are and deserve to be acknowledged as b/c you had a 3.9 from a target or can approach a Director at a BB and start shooting the shit about his thoughts on the talk about hedging strategies with ETFs - yes, I did that). Throughout it all, I was drained and discouraged at times but .... drum roll please ....

    I was offered two positions within a 24 hour period. I don't want to get involved with details, but needless to say I was blessed to be in a situation job seekers dream of and was able to honestly and ethically leverage a deal with the role I had originally wanted. I am glad to report that I have landed the Due Diligence role and start next week.

    I hope my story inspires, motivates and reassures readers that it is possible to go out and get shit done. Your dream job is a handshake away.

    Cheers,

    T

  • SirTradesaLot's picture

    That is badass.

    adapt or die:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • Christopher Moltisanti's picture

    Congrats bud. You earned it.

  • pktkid10's picture

    Awesome. Way to go.

    I'm on the pursuit of happiness and I know everything that shine ain't always gonna be gold. I'll be fine once I get it

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  • advantageplayer's picture

    The best revenge is massive success. -Frank Sinatra

  • huanleshalemei's picture

    The Auto Show

  • In reply to DJBanker
    huanleshalemei's picture

    The Auto Show

  • Cmoss's picture
  • PeteMullersKeyboard's picture

    "When you stop striving for perfection, you might as well be dead."

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