• Sharebar

Hi all,

I wanted to ask for recommendations on what websites to read in the morning to 1) know what the current events are in the markets 2) to learn new things about the finance world.

Any recommendations? Thanks a lot!

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Comments (50)

  • General Disarray's picture

    I usually start my mornings with playboy

  • Nicholas Van Orton's picture

    I'm a freshman as well. I usually check out The Economist or Financial Times.

  • In reply to General Disarray
    OMS's picture

    General Disarray:
    I usually start my mornings with playboy

    this is what i was going when i was a freshy.

  • BTbanker's picture

    WSJ, Dealbook, Dealbreaker, Financial Times, and WSO. Also, watch CNBC and Bloomberg TV simultaneously.

    Also, it might not be a good idea to show your age and school in your signature. Not only is it douchey, but people will find out who you are, and it could hurt your career.

  • In reply to BTbanker
    Sandhurst's picture

    BTbanker:
    WSJ, Dealbook, Dealbreaker, Financial Times, and WSO. Also, watch CNBC and Bloomberg TV simultaneously.

    Also, it might not be a good idea to show your age and school in your signature. Not only is it douchey, but people will find out who you are, and it could hurt your career.

    All good points. I've sketched out my reading routine below. The morning stuff I tend to read cover to cover. I also read pretty much everything on Dealbreaker, because it's hysterical. Note: this is as a college senior, who is planning on joining an IBD group after graduation.

    My morning reading (inbox arrival times EST):
    -UBS Economics morning note (by 3:30 am)
    -Bond Buyer daily digest (by 4:30 am)
    -The Gartman Letter (by 6 am)
    -American Banker daily digest (by 8 am)
    -Thomson Reuters morning note (by market open)
    -Deakbook morning digest (by market open)
    -Dealbreaker Opening Bell (by 10 am)
    -Term Sheet (noon-ish)

    Throughout the day:
    -WSJ (the app is fantastic)
    -Dealbook (especially items by Steven Davidoff, aka the "Deal Professor")
    -Dealbreaker (Matt Levine does a great job of distilling complicated ideas, & is funny as well if you get his humor)
    -My portfolio (via Bloomberg's, Reuters', & my brokerage's apps)
    -WSO (honestly, less so more recently)

    Weekly:
    -Hedge Fund Alert (mostly for the "Grapevine")
    -My brokerage's macro research (can get tedious, so I skim)
    -Various equity research (individual stocks, industry guides, etc.)
    -A few other product- & industry-specific newsletters (ask alum/network contacts for their favorites)

    Ongoing:
    -Various books (recent titles include The Big Short & When Genius Failed)

    Pleasure reading (this is important, by the way - don't be a finance robot!):
    -Literature (a lot by Hemingway lately)
    -A few blogs (relating to my university, sports interests, funny stuff, etc.)

    "There are three ways to make a living in this business: be first, be smarter, or cheat."

  • Jamess1's picture

    Props to these students looking to get ahead this way. I wish I was this smart when I was a freshman. Freshman year most mornings I was reading my text messages from the previous night to make sure I didn't drunk text 384752 girls.

    Blue horseshoe loves Anacott Steel

  • Jamess1's picture

    .

    Blue horseshoe loves Anacott Steel

  • rajpbt's picture

    FT,
    WSJ,
    seekingalpha,
    The Economist,
    WSO,
    finance.google.com

  • pcubed's picture

    @Sandhurst: Thanks for a great response! I know I wouldn't be able to read all of those you listed but I will try some of them out. Any other recommendations at my level?

    "You see that building? I bought that building ten years ago. My first real estate deal. Sold it two years later, made an $800,000 profit. It was better than sex. At the time I thought that was all the money in the world. Now it's a day's pay."

  • In reply to pcubed
    Sandhurst's picture

    ppatell:
    @Sandhurst: Thanks for a great response! I know I wouldn't be able to read all of those you listed but I will try some of them out. Any other recommendations at my level?

    The morning reading that I listed probably totals ~1.5 hour, which I'll read over breakfast, walking, between classes, etc., all on my phone.

    That said, if you were to trim, my recommendation would be to keep the UBS note (it's succinct; max 2 min), the Gartman Letter (varies; ~15 min), American Banker (skim; ~5 min), Thomson Reuters (super worthwhile; ~10 min), Dealbook (varies; ~15 min), and Term Sheet (also great; ~10 min).

    That makes for a total of approx 45 min, after which you will be informed on (in the same order) macro news, global markets, US financial industry, US equities, US i-banking, and US private equity & venture capital. Not a bad deal.

    "There are three ways to make a living in this business: be first, be smarter, or cheat."

  • aspharagus's picture

    Hi sandhurst

    May i know where you get your subscriptions to term sheet and UBS Economics morning note?

    I can't seem to find them online.

  • Bondholm's picture

    Hi Sandhurst.

    Are these free? Also, I have googled UBS Econ morning notes and Reuters morning notes and there was no result.

    Snootchie Bootchies

  • MindOverMonkey's picture

    Someone already mentioned seeking alpha, but they have a wall street breakfast newsletter that will email you a quick breakdown every morning around 9. It can also be humorous at times.

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  • aspharagus's picture

    Thanks so much Sandhurst for the replies.

    Did you do a paid subscription to the Gartman Letter? For American Banker, Bond Buyer, it seems i need a business email or else I can't get them up and running.

    Do advise if you can.

  • In reply to Sandhurst
    rogersterling59's picture

    Sandhurst:
    BTbanker:
    WSJ, Dealbook, Dealbreaker, Financial Times, and WSO. Also, watch CNBC and Bloomberg TV simultaneously.

    Also, it might not be a good idea to show your age and school in your signature. Not only is it douchey, but people will find out who you are, and it could hurt your career.

    All good points. I've sketched out my reading routine below. The morning stuff I tend to read cover to cover. I also read pretty much everything on Dealbreaker, because it's hysterical. Note: this is as a college senior, who is planning on joining an IBD group after graduation.

    My morning reading (inbox arrival times EST):
    -UBS Economics morning note (by 3:30 am)
    -Bond Buyer daily digest (by 4:30 am)
    -The Gartman Letter (by 6 am)
    -American Banker daily digest (by 8 am)
    -Thomson Reuters morning note (by market open)
    -Deakbook morning digest (by market open)
    -Dealbreaker Opening Bell (by 10 am)
    -Term Sheet (noon-ish)

    Throughout the day:
    -WSJ (the app is fantastic)
    -Dealbook (especially items by Steven Davidoff, aka the "Deal Professor")
    -Dealbreaker (Matt Levine does a great job of distilling complicated ideas, & is funny as well if you get his humor)
    -My portfolio (via Bloomberg's, Reuters', & my brokerage's apps)
    -WSO (honestly, less so more recently)

    Weekly:
    -Hedge Fund Alert (mostly for the "Grapevine")
    -My brokerage's macro research (can get tedious, so I skim)
    -Various equity research (individual stocks, industry guides, etc.)
    -A few other product- & industry-specific newsletters (ask alum/network contacts for their favorites)

    Ongoing:
    -Various books (recent titles include The Big Short & When Genius Failed)

    Pleasure reading (this is important, by the way - don't be a finance robot!):
    -Literature (a lot by Hemingway lately)
    -A few blogs (relating to my university, sports interests, funny stuff, etc.)

    All of this is good stuff. I'd also add Wall St. Breakfast from Seeking Alpha. Get it sent to your email. And check out zerohedge. It might be the most doom-and-gloom financial website out there, but it is still very good stuff, and has a lot of other good websites listed on it down the left side of the home page. You can also follow zerohedge on twitter. They post news there much quicker than Bloomberg or CNBC or any of the other financial news twitter feeds.

    Although if this is your routine as a college senior, you really need to get a fucking life.

    I would agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  • In reply to MindOverMonkey
    rogersterling59's picture

    MindOverMonkey:
    Someone already mentioned seeking alpha, but they have a wall street breakfast newsletter that will email you a quick breakdown every morning around 9. It can also be humorous at times.

    With the current state of the financial system and the hilarity of the fiscal cliff negotiations, pretty much any financial/economic news is humorous these days...

    I would agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  • In reply to Sandhurst
    Ichan's picture

    Sandhurst:
    BTbanker:
    WSJ, Dealbook, Dealbreaker, Financial Times, and WSO. Also, watch CNBC and Bloomberg TV simultaneously.

    Also, it might not be a good idea to show your age and school in your signature. Not only is it douchey, but people will find out who you are, and it could hurt your career.

    All good points. I've sketched out my reading routine below. The morning stuff I tend to read cover to cover. I also read pretty much everything on Dealbreaker, because it's hysterical. Note: this is as a college senior, who is planning on joining an IBD group after graduation.

    My morning reading (inbox arrival times EST):
    -UBS Economics morning note (by 3:30 am)
    -Bond Buyer daily digest (by 4:30 am)
    -The Gartman Letter (by 6 am)
    -American Banker daily digest (by 8 am)
    -Thomson Reuters morning note (by market open)
    -Deakbook morning digest (by market open)
    -Dealbreaker Opening Bell (by 10 am)
    -Term Sheet (noon-ish)

    Throughout the day:
    -WSJ (the app is fantastic)
    -Dealbook (especially items by Steven Davidoff, aka the "Deal Professor")
    -Dealbreaker (Matt Levine does a great job of distilling complicated ideas, & is funny as well if you get his humor)
    -My portfolio (via Bloomberg's, Reuters', & my brokerage's apps)
    -WSO (honestly, less so more recently)

    Weekly:
    -Hedge Fund Alert (mostly for the "Grapevine")
    -My brokerage's macro research (can get tedious, so I skim)
    -Various equity research (individual stocks, industry guides, etc.)
    -A few other product- & industry-specific newsletters (ask alum/network contacts for their favorites)

    Ongoing:
    -Various books (recent titles include The Big Short & When Genius Failed)

    Pleasure reading (this is important, by the way - don't be a finance robot!):
    -Literature (a lot by Hemingway lately)
    -A few blogs (relating to my university, sports interests, funny stuff, etc.)

    Thnx mate

    It's not about the money. It's about the game between people.

  • Cruncharoo's picture

    I check my facebook, twitter, barstoolsports, kissingsuzykolber, profootballtalk, my fantasy team and my fanduel teams.

    This to all my hatin' folks seeing me getting guac right now..

  • Cruncharoo's picture

    Oh and linkedin if I'm really bored out of my mind

    This to all my hatin' folks seeing me getting guac right now..

  • Hayek's picture

    WSJ, FT, and AbnormalReturns.com (a daily linkfest of the best finance/econ writing in the blogosphere) are really all you need.

  • In reply to Sandhurst
    oowij's picture

    Sandhurst:
    BTbanker:
    WSJ, Dealbook, Dealbreaker, Financial Times, and WSO. Also, watch CNBC and Bloomberg TV simultaneously.

    Also, it might not be a good idea to show your age and school in your signature. Not only is it douchey, but people will find out who you are, and it could hurt your career.

    All good points. I've sketched out my reading routine below. The morning stuff I tend to read cover to cover. I also read pretty much everything on Dealbreaker, because it's hysterical. Note: this is as a college senior, who is planning on joining an IBD group after graduation.

    My morning reading (inbox arrival times EST):
    -UBS Economics morning note (by 3:30 am)
    -Bond Buyer daily digest (by 4:30 am)
    -The Gartman Letter (by 6 am)
    -American Banker daily digest (by 8 am)
    -Thomson Reuters morning note (by market open)
    -Deakbook morning digest (by market open)
    -Dealbreaker Opening Bell (by 10 am)
    -Term Sheet (noon-ish)

    Throughout the day:
    -WSJ (the app is fantastic)
    -Dealbook (especially items by Steven Davidoff, aka the "Deal Professor")
    -Dealbreaker (Matt Levine does a great job of distilling complicated ideas, & is funny as well if you get his humor)
    -My portfolio (via Bloomberg's, Reuters', & my brokerage's apps)
    -WSO (honestly, less so more recently)

    Weekly:
    -Hedge Fund Alert (mostly for the "Grapevine")
    -My brokerage's macro research (can get tedious, so I skim)
    -Various equity research (individual stocks, industry guides, etc.)
    -A few other product- & industry-specific newsletters (ask alum/network contacts for their favorites)

    Ongoing:
    -Various books (recent titles include The Big Short & When Genius Failed)

    Pleasure reading (this is important, by the way - don't be a finance robot!):
    -Literature (a lot by Hemingway lately)
    -A few blogs (relating to my university, sports interests, funny stuff, etc.)

    I have to ask, but do you really go through all of this as you've listed every day? I find it hard to believe as I rarely get enough time to even read WSJ/Dealbook in its entirety every morning.

  • In reply to Hayek
    pcubed's picture

    Hayek:
    WSJ, FT, and AbnormalReturns (a daily linkfest of the best finance/econ writing in the blogosphere) are really all you need.

    Thanks a lot!
    I'm going to stick with WSJ, Bloomberg, Seeking Alpha's Wall Street Breakfast, and FT.

    I quick question in regards to WSJ: Most of the articles on WSJ need a subscription, is there anyway, besides pay for a subscription, that I can get access to the locked articles?

    Thanks!

    "You see that building? I bought that building ten years ago. My first real estate deal. Sold it two years later, made an $800,000 profit. It was better than sex. At the time I thought that was all the money in the world. Now it's a day's pay."

  • In reply to pcubed
    Hayek's picture

    ppatell:
    Hayek:
    WSJ, FT, and AbnormalReturns (a daily linkfest of the best finance/econ writing in the blogosphere) are really all you need.

    Thanks a lot!
    I'm going to stick with WSJ, Bloomberg, Seeking Alpha's Wall Street Breakfast, and FT.

    I quick question in regards to WSJ: Most of the articles on WSJ need a subscription, is there anyway, besides pay for a subscription, that I can get access to the locked articles?

    Thanks!

    Try Googling the name of the article. Sometimes people will grab them and post them online. You might be able to get a student discount for the WSJ too. When I was in college there were stacks of WSJs in the mail room that you could just take; they may do something similar for the online subscriptions.

    Also, AbnormalReturns.com is well worth checking daily. They do a fantastic job of culling all the really interesting stuff out there from many, many different sources.

  • In reply to oowij
    Sandhurst's picture

    oowij:

    I have to ask, but do you really go through all of this as you've listed every day? I find it hard to believe as I rarely get enough time to even read WSJ/Dealbook in its entirety every morning.

    Honestly? Yes. It seems like a lot, but the morning reading represents about 90 minutes, the rest of Dealbreaker is another 20 over the day, keeping up with WSJ is probably 30 minutes.. All in, I probably average 3 hours of finance reading a day. On weekends, that goes down to basically zero, unless I'm reading a book. It's not a killer commitment if you enjoy it, I be honest.

    "There are three ways to make a living in this business: be first, be smarter, or cheat."

  • In reply to Hayek
    pcubed's picture

    Hayek:
    ppatell:
    Hayek:
    WSJ, FT, and AbnormalReturns (a daily linkfest of the best finance/econ writing in the blogosphere) are really all you need.

    Thanks a lot!
    I'm going to stick with WSJ, Bloomberg, Seeking Alpha's Wall Street Breakfast, and FT.

    I quick question in regards to WSJ: Most of the articles on WSJ need a subscription, is there anyway, besides pay for a subscription, that I can get access to the locked articles?

    Thanks!

    Try Googling the name of the article. Sometimes people will grab them and post them online. You might be able to get a student discount for the WSJ too. When I was in college there were stacks of WSJs in the mail room that you could just take; they may do something similar for the online subscriptions.

    Also, AbnormalReturns.com is well worth checking daily. They do a fantastic job of culling all the really interesting stuff out there from many, many different sources.

    Just checked AbnormalReturns right now. It's a bit tedious compared to other websites to navigate through, but the events/topics they highlight are quite informative!

    I wake up an hour and a half before my first class starts which gives me about 45 minutes to browse. Currently I used to watch a stream of CNBC and browse through Bloomberg/WSJ. Now with these websites, I'll spend that time as well as time during classes to read, hopefully all, the articles:

    WSJ, Bloomberg:(Is it a good source to spend time reading?), FT, SA's Wall Street Breakfast, FT, and Abnormal returns.

    I hope I will be more on top of current events so if people are having a conversation, I can add input to it. Also, I'll learn more concepts!

    Thanks a lot everyone! I appreciate it! I'm weirdly ecstatic right now haha.

    "You see that building? I bought that building ten years ago. My first real estate deal. Sold it two years later, made an $800,000 profit. It was better than sex. At the time I thought that was all the money in the world. Now it's a day's pay."

  • In reply to Sandhurst
    oowij's picture

    Sandhurst:
    oowij:

    I have to ask, but do you really go through all of this as you've listed every day? I find it hard to believe as I rarely get enough time to even read WSJ/Dealbook in its entirety every morning.

    Honestly? Yes. It seems like a lot, but the morning reading represents about 90 minutes, the rest of Dealbreaker is another 20 over the day, keeping up with WSJ is probably 30 minutes.. All in, I probably average 3 hours of finance reading a day. On weekends, that goes down to basically zero, unless I'm reading a book. It's not a killer commitment if you enjoy it, I be honest.

    90 minutes of reading in the morning, that's a huge commitment. Kudos to you sir. I'm a college senior that reads the paper every morning as well, but I definitely don't have time for 3 hours of financial reading per day.

  • In reply to Sandhurst
    SHA1991's picture

    ^ Great point on the pleasure read from the long post above. On top of the obvious ones like WSJ, FT, Dealbreaker, etc, I can't help but read every new post from Barstool Sports. Those guys are pure genius. They somehow manage to point out everything hilarious going on in the world, with great commentary. They are also city specific (Boston, New York, Chicago, and Philly so far). Website address is nyc.barstoolsports.com

  • In reply to Sandhurst
    WallStreetOasis.com's picture

    Sandhurst:
    oowij:

    I have to ask, but do you really go through all of this as you've listed every day? I find it hard to believe as I rarely get enough time to even read WSJ/Dealbook in its entirety every morning.

    Honestly? Yes. It seems like a lot, but the morning reading represents about 90 minutes, the rest of Dealbreaker is another 20 over the day, keeping up with WSJ is probably 30 minutes.. All in, I probably average 3 hours of finance reading a day. On weekends, that goes down to basically zero, unless I'm reading a book. It's not a killer commitment if you enjoy it, I be honest.

    Sanhurst, great suggestions here. would love to get your feedback (or others) on why you think you've been frequenting WSO less recently?

    We have thick skin so telling us what brought you here before and what you aren't getting now is very informative to us...we've heard from several sources that they used to read WSO every day, but that deluge of college prospectives (once they got a job), made it less interesting to them.

    Traffic continues to grow with WSO, but with that growth we want to make sure we are also giving enough vlaue to our best users (Certified Users like yourself).

    That being said, we have made efforts to improve the content with more Q&As and more stuff for the Certified Users, but woudl love to hear specific things that you may have noticed (also always welcome feedback from others)

    Thanks,
    Patrick

  • Bobby Digital's picture

    If you are a freshman, spend your time doing something fun and worry about finance in a few years.

  • In reply to Bobby Digital
    pcubed's picture

    Bobby Digital:
    If you are a freshman, spend your time doing something fun and worry about finance in a few years.

    ...or I can do both.

    "You see that building? I bought that building ten years ago. My first real estate deal. Sold it two years later, made an $800,000 profit. It was better than sex. At the time I thought that was all the money in the world. Now it's a day's pay."

  • barbariansatthegates's picture

    Great question OP and awesome info. Thanks Sandhurst

    PE is the new black.

  • In reply to barbariansatthegates
    pcubed's picture

    barbariansatthegates:
    Great question OP and awesome info. Thanks Sandhurst

    I'm actually quite surprised that this question wasn't asked previously. No problem!

    "You see that building? I bought that building ten years ago. My first real estate deal. Sold it two years later, made an $800,000 profit. It was better than sex. At the time I thought that was all the money in the world. Now it's a day's pay."

  • ChiTown82's picture

    Sandhurst - why the Bond Buyer? You plan on joining a muni group or just interested in the industry?

  • In reply to General Disarray
    Tommy Too-toned's picture

    General Disarray:
    I usually start my mornings with playboy

    Why not Brazzers? More Bang for your buck

  • In reply to Tommy Too-toned
    General Disarray's picture

    Tommy Too-toned:
    General Disarray:
    I usually start my mornings with playboy

    Why not Brazzers? More Bang for your buck

    I like reading the articles

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  • ladubs111's picture
  • In reply to ChiTown82
    Sandhurst's picture

    "There are three ways to make a living in this business: be first, be smarter, or cheat."

  • In reply to meabric
    ucmaroon47's picture

    And so it goes

  • In reply to WallStreetOasis.com
    Sandhurst's picture

    "There are three ways to make a living in this business: be first, be smarter, or cheat."