8 Reflections on Leaving IB After a Decade

It was recently noted by a commenter that I haven't done much on this board besides fight about politics for quite some time. The truth is, as one of the older posters still around, I'd given most all advice that I could think of as I rose through the IB ranks. However, this year I left investment banking to join a sponsor-backed portfolio company and thought I'd check back in here to share a few reflections after a decade in investment banking for the younger monkeys to consider.

Yes, it was worth it. With one major caveat.

This is the $750 question (you didn't expect me to avoid all politics references, did you?!). I can confidently say that entering and staying in IB was worth it for me. I got to travel the world, sit in with F500 executives, work on interesting transactions, and make significant money along the way that allowed me to experience life to the fullest while setting my family up well for the foreseeable future. The highly anticipated "exit ops" were interesting and plentiful for me, even in a depressed Covid job market.

However, I never in 10 years worked in a sweatshop, and my regular hours were far closer to 60 than 100. I only recall pulling 6 true all-nighters in 10 years and rarely spent a weekend night in the office. Part of this was luck (and sometimes inconsistent deal flow) at the shops/offices I worked, part of it was by design (I passed on approaches from "better" banks for bigger bonuses, knowing I'd be signing away my limited free time). I worked til midnight during the weeks throughout my 20s and never joined a Tuesday softball league or Thursday night trivia, but rarely missed the big events that were important to me (i.e. weddings, bachelor parties, family holidays, ski trips). I considered that a fair tradeoff, and made all of the warped work/life warped balance worth it. Had I missed out on the important things (like I concede so many of you have to do), I don't think I could justify ten years in the investment banking industry, no matter the size of the paycheck.

I stayed in IB the first five years for the experience, and the last five for the paycheck

Pretty self explanatory, but the learning curve flattens out far quicker than you'd imagine. I always worked in standard vanilla sell-side shops, so most transactions looked the same. Once I hit VP, there was very little to learn from each new transaction, and I was on a glide path to a glorified high-paying sales gig. Each bonus season, I had fewer reasons to stick around for another 12 months, but the bonuses kept getting bigger and the hours lighter. A good problem to have, no doubt, but at some point, I knew I'd have to jump off the merry-go-round, because I was far too young to "ride it out".

Golden handcuffs are real, and hit a lot sooner than you'd expect

Usually you hear about the MD who can't leave banking because they have to pay for three mortgages and four private school tuitions (and I've seen that story play out plenty of times). What I'm talking about is the 25-year old who is already making more money than they thought they'd ever see in their lifetime. I passed up a lot of interesting opportunities simply because I couldn't justify rolling the dice and taking a 75% pay cut at a young age. Had I been making $50k, I'd gladly swap that out for a more interesting $50k job, and perhaps I would have found my passion or rose to greater heights in another field. You can count on one hand the number of jobs that offer a 25-year old $250k outside of banking, and it's really hard to walk away from that, no matter how much equity your friend's startup promises you. 

Live within your means and always prepare for a life outside banking

On a related note, save your money. I have two watches - one cost $200 and the other was $10. My nicest car was under $30k. I get far more joy knowing I have enough savings to last 10+ years without working, than I ever got from buying bottle service. A career in banking is highly volatile especially as you ascend the ranks, and you always need to prepare to take that big paycut if you ever leave (or get kicked out of) the industry.

Prestige is an empty pursuit, but I understand the allure

I was that college kid who wanted Goldman on my business card like everyone else here. Never happened for me, and I quickly learned that all that stuff wears off quickly. Prestige is something employers sell you to underpay and/or overwork you. It carries no value, and the sooner you discard that from your equation, the more clarity you'll find when making those big career decisions.

Drop the ego as soon as possible

No one cares you're a banker. You're a glorified Excel/Powerpoint monkey, then a salesman going hat in hand begging for your next mandate. Most of your friends think it's pathetic you work so many hours. And truthfully, most of my friends outside of IB were happier than I was. The difference now is I host them at my lakehouse. Who cares? We both get a lakehouse weekend out of it, and theirs is free of charge.

You only live your twenties once

Tying in a lot of the points above - a career in banking is all about delayed gratitude. Work 80 hours weeks in your 20s for that cushy buyside gig or 7 figure C-suite job in the second half of your career. And that is a tried and true path! But I had more fun in my 20s at $1 beer night than I could ever have now with 7 figures in the bank. I'm settled down with a family, and life is great! But it's a different kind of great. That period in your life to live carefree on the weekends, jetting around the country, skiing, golfing, etc. only happens once. You wait to do that as a single guy in your 40s, and you're the creepy rich guy in the bar. Find a balance. Set your limits. Ensure you have something to show for your 20s besides a bank account and work stories.

Learn and practice empathy

If there's one thing that troubles me observing WSO over the years, it's the seemingly lack of empathy conveyed by many posters. Many of you grew up in extreme or at least above-average wealth. Many of you are white males, that yes, still have an enormous amount of privilege, even in 2020. Don't feel bad about that, but be grateful for it. The fact that all of you even found this website puts you in the .01% of the workforce who can expect to live a pretty prosperous and comfortable life. A 22-year old who gets a donut for a bonus will still be in the 97th percentile of income earners for their age with just their base salary.

Have empathy for those who aren't in the same position as you. Yeah, you worked hard. So do billions across the world. You also fell into a hell of a lot of luck along the way. I still don't know how I landed my first IB job - I was in the second round interview before I even knew what role I was interviewing for, and I have no recollection of ever applying to that firm. I didn't even know of investment banking until I caught my senior year roommate browsing Wall Street Oasis and asked a few questions. Internalize how much good fortune played into your story, and you might look at our world's issues a bit differently with more compassion.  

Take care WSO! I've had a rocky relationship with the Trump crowd on here the last few years, but I will always be grateful for the education and guidance this website provided earlier in my career. Patrick and team have built a great resource, and you all are lucky to find such a great career resource at your fingertips.

Comments (94)

 
Nov 20, 2020 - 12:17pm

Alt-Ctr-Left

 

Have empathy for those who aren't in the same position as you. Yeah, you worked hard. So do billions across the world. You also fell into a hell of a lot of luck along the way.

Would also note that the biggest part of that luck is having been born in a country that still respects the free enerprise system. It's up to us to pass on that luck to the next generation.

Unfortunately, the reason that billions around the world work hard for nothing has everything to do with bad economic policies which they are unlucky enough to be born under.

 
Most Helpful
Nov 20, 2020 - 9:13pm

What a comedicly bad take on the source of inequality. Billions around the world work hard for nothing because their countries were raped by the western world for their natural resources, material wealth, and labor over the period of hundreds of years, not because they "don't respect free enerprise". Hard for a kid to get that investment banking summer analyst offer when their country has been in a constant state of war for two decades due to the US randomly dropping in and destabilizing an entire sub-continent. 

 
Nov 20, 2020 - 9:57pm

Sure, colonialism initially screwed a lot of these countries. However, at a certain point, you can't blame colonialism from 200 years ago for bad policies instituted by these governments yesterday. For example, Spain is not responsible in any way for the terrible policies instituted by the Venezuelan government in the past few decades. It is the Venezuelan government's fault for destroying its own country.

The problem with a lot of these countries is not the West robbing them. It is the fact that many of these countries are organized as kleptocracies where a small group of elites rob their own people and keep them poor.

 
Nov 27, 2020 - 11:53am

First of all, thank you so much for writing this article. It was extremely informative and well-written, always glad to hear from very successful people and people who have achieved and persevered through a dauntless IB career! 

On equality, I would say your take is so and so. I come from Lebanon, a third world country that had it all. A beautiful coastline, mountains, ski resorts, tourism, a diaspora that sends billion is remittances every month. Lebanon is currently undergoing a severe financial crisis, our bank accounts are frozen and long-gone, banks do not lend us a single dollar of our money.

Unemployment is at 40%, and we are second to none other than Venezuela in inflation. This will leave a large part of the generation behind, creating a vacuum or a lost decade or two. Everything is caused by the inept, elite ruling class, the terrible government that tried to provide by the company by only taxing certain parts of the country, the millions of public employees who made absurd money leaving well above their means by bribes, inflated pensions and belonging to certain political groups, all supplemented by politicians that ravaged and quite-literally killed us (August 4 Bomb that left hundreds perishing, wrongful storage of chemical weapons).

The more a government is given power, the more regular, hardworking people are hurt, the more inequality exists. This isn't specifically about Trump or Republican policies, but they truly are better for the middle class and pushing people from lower-income levels to higher ones. If Lebanon did not rely so much on imports, supported and built proper infrastructure to help out local produce and exports, we would not have a balooning debt bubble, a faltering currency and all the terrible things people are coping with.

Again, thank you so much for the insightful post! You have truly made my day!

 
Nov 21, 2020 - 7:55pm

Agree that having a free market system and entrepreneurial culture that rewards risk-taking and innovation is a big factor for US wealth, but it's a huge stretch to say that wealth inequality is mostly due to bad economic policies. The US is protected by 2 large oceans and didn't suffer large-scale destruction of its infrastructure and industrial base like its rivals in Europe and Russia did in WW1 and 2. The US has only really been a superpower since WW2, when almost all of its rivals were left in shambles. The US also has advantages because it encourages immigration, leading to an inflow of talented and industrious employees (immigrants by their nature are more risk-taking), which is more of a cultural reason than an economic one. And last but not least, as other posters have noted, the US also didn't have its resources and people pillaged for hundreds of years by a colonial overlord. India is a good example of a country massively set back by colonialism. When the British arrived in India, it produced 23% of the world's GDP, and Britain 2%. When the British left 300 years later, Britain was at 15% and India was at 2%, with massive de-industrialization occurring in the first few decades of colonization, as India was transformed into an agricultural country that was only meant to be a captive market for finished British goods. Similar stories have been repeated in dozens of other countries over the last 400 years or so.

 
Nov 21, 2020 - 8:27pm

+1 SB for the good coherent discussion points even though I don't completely agree on all points.

I think the WW2 point is an interesting one because it really cuts both ways. For example, Germany was basically leveled to the ground and half the country was taken over by communists. 70 years later.....Germany is economically the strongest nation in the EU.

That's one of the things that makes me a little skeptical on fully blaming colonialism. As is the case of Germany or say China that had millions of people starving, gulags, etc., we've seen that you can completely destroy a nation but if you have the right policies in place, it can bounce back within 50 years.

So, I look at former colonies and other countries such as Russia and much of eastern Europe and ask myself, "why did these countries not bounce back in 50 years?"  There is no doubt that colonialism, wars, and destruction cause real economic damage, but I think it's more difficult to explain why it's sometimes 50 years of damage and why it's sometimes 200 years of damage. And in my opinion, when you start looking into the details of those countries, the policies and leadership are a big culprit.

Also, I think that the Eastern European examples are particularly interesting here. Yes, there were 50 years of being beyond the iron wall, but we don't have real colonialism unless you count something like Turkey's control of the Balkans and Greece. Yet, even without colonialism, these countries langish in a sort of 2nd world status.

Side note: US immigration is a policy stance....perhaps by circumstance of past heritage but regardless. In a hard-core libertarian sense, open borders and freedom of movement are very free-market principles.

 

 
Nov 20, 2020 - 12:50pm

Although I often lurk and disagree with your political posts, this was very well-written and insightful. Appreciate it!

If you don't mind sharing did exit into a corp dev/strat role or is it something more operating focused? If more operating focused what made you leave the finance side of things?

 
Nov 20, 2020 - 5:39pm

nontarget hardo

Although I often lurk and disagree with your political posts, this was very well-written and insightful. Appreciate it!

If you don't mind sharing did exit into a corp dev/strat role or is it something more operating focused? If more operating focused what made you leave the finance side of things?

Corp Dev/Strategic Finance route with a path to CFO down the road. It seemed like the natural transition in-house, and perhaps I'll explore other operational paths once I spend more time on the inside.

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
  • 1
 
Nov 20, 2020 - 5:41pm

high hopes

What level bank were you at? Sounds like boutique or LMM focused shop?

Standard MM name you'd know

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
 
  • Prospect in IB-M&A
Nov 20, 2020 - 3:31pm

You said you were too young to ride it out so you decided to leave. I am interested, what is your next career move? It sounds like you find it more exciting/riskier so curious to see what you left a job that you seemed relatively happy with for.

 
Nov 20, 2020 - 5:43pm

 

You said you were too young to ride it out so you decided to leave. I am interested, what is your next career move? It sounds like you find it more exciting/riskier so curious to see what you left a job that you seemed relatively happy with for.

I didn't hate banking by any means, but I had no interest in shooting for MD, and frankly wasn't sure my network would be strong enough to build that consistent deal flow with sponsors (I didn't grow up with money, didn't attend b school full-time, etc.). I'd always wanted to sit on the other side of the table from my clients and help execute on a growth strategy long-term. It's a much more dynamic and well-rounded role than reviewing comps, pitchbooks, and CIMs that your analysts and associates put together for you.

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
  • 1
 
  • Prospect in IB - Gen
Nov 20, 2020 - 4:32pm

Take care WSO! I've had a rocky relationship with the Trump crowd on here the last few years, but I will always be grateful for the education and guidance this website provided earlier in my career. Patrick and team have built a great resource, and you all are lucky to find such a great career resource at your fingertips.

You're still better than Financeabc! 

 
Nov 20, 2020 - 5:44pm

 

Take care WSO! I've had a rocky relationship with the Trump crowd on here the last few years, but I will always be grateful for the education and guidance this website provided earlier in my career. Patrick and team have built a great resource, and you all are lucky to find such a great career resource at your fingertips.

You're still better than Financeabc! 

If you only knew how often Trump was openly mocked in the finance world, young prospect...

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
  • 5
  • 3
 
  • Analyst 1 in IB-M&A
Nov 23, 2020 - 6:14pm

Finance is full of pretty smart people from across the political spectrum. Even the people that support Trump know he's an idiot - he's just a useful one.

 
  • Analyst 1 in IB-M&A
Nov 20, 2020 - 6:36pm

When you mention you have savings to last 10+ years, do you mean outside of your retirement account, or with that included? 

 
Nov 20, 2020 - 8:06pm

This is an amazing post and thank you for sharing.

I am curious about your thoughts/observations about doing banking right out of undergrad vs spending your 20s in other roles and going the post-MBA Associate route? Were there any not-so-obvious advantages of either path that you observed or experienced?

 
Nov 21, 2020 - 10:41am

Wondering this as well. MBA associates get a lot of shit but I've had calls with a few recently that are genuinely intelligent people. Do you usually see MBA associates still able to rise through the ranks of banking?

 
  • Prospect in IB - Gen
Nov 21, 2020 - 2:04pm

Any recommendation of spending a longer time at an EB or BB? And personally, how do you think the two differ? Thanks!!

 

 
Nov 21, 2020 - 4:40pm

 

Any recommendation of spending a longer time at an EB or BB? And personally, how do you think the two differ? Thanks!!

 

I think it's a bit easier to stay on the banking track at a BB where you have a balance sheet and built in coverage universe you can inherit from senior bankers. EBs can ride a couple of strong bankers but don't have much to fall back on, so your office fortunes can change quickly with senior departures, and thus affect your long term prospects. MMs are in a crowded space and have less to differentiate themselves. Most have far too many sub sector coverage teams and there's very little room for a VP/Director to make room for themselves as they ascend the ranks.   It can make it harder to make "the jump"  from deal execution to BD. 

In general though I think this forum worries way too much about BB vs EB vs MM vs boutique. All offer interesting work, good pay, long hours, and promising exit ops. Figure out what's important to you besides the category of the bank, and make your job decisions accordingly.

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
  • 4
 
Nov 23, 2020 - 9:52am

BigTuna5

Amazing post! If you could go back, anything you'd do differently? Any advice you'd give your younger self? 

Good question. If I could do it over again, I would have partied a little less in college and gotten a better GPA, which limited my 1st job opportunities. I was still able to lateral into IB later and things worked out well, but I think I benefitted from a lot of luck and good fortune, and made it harder on myself than it needed to be. There's plenty of time to study and party in college if you manage your time well and treat your studies like a job. Stay on campus/in the library until 6pm, and then do whatever you want with the rest of your night. I also see far too many college kids today ONLY study, and end up with 8 internships on their resume by 21. You're only in college once, enjoy it!  (Covid notwithstanding).

I'll have to sit in my current chair a bit longer to know if I'll have any regrets on when/how I left banking.

As for advice, it took me awhile to stop getting caught up in the "fire drill of the day" which would temporarily overwhelm me, and the inevitably blow over or not materialize. Eventually I put I put a 10-10-10 rule into place to help me level set my reaction appropriately. Will this (situation) matter in 10 days (random work deadline), 10 months (trouble with girlfriend, missed promotion) or 10 years (death or illness of a loved one)? I'd then try to match my emotional reaction accordingly. I spent too much time stressing about the 10 Day category early on, and not a single one of those things ultimately mattered (I can't even remember the vast majority of them now).    

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
  • 1
 
Nov 21, 2020 - 5:39pm

I'm interested in what made you shoot for director as opposed to leaving at VP? Was it just comp and wanting to maximise your nest egg before branching out? I ask because at my firm (consulting so maybe a different model) we have engagement manager - director - partner. Plenty of people make it to EM and then leave, the assumption from the firm and the team is people who make it to directors could be and want to be partners one day. Did you ever want to be MD got close enough to see the reality and realised you didn't like the idea?

 
Nov 27, 2020 - 1:12pm

JCCOL

I'm interested in what made you shoot for director as opposed to leaving at VP? Was it just comp and wanting to maximise your nest egg before branching out? I ask because at my firm (consulting so maybe a different model) we have engagement manager - director - partner. Plenty of people make it to EM and then leave, the assumption from the firm and the team is people who make it to directors could be and want to be partners one day. Did you ever want to be MD got close enough to see the reality and realised you didn't like the idea?

I knew I didn't want the MD life forever, so I worked backwards and determined I could still make the transition in-house during my mid 30s/young Director years. If I waited any longer, I ran the risk of being pigeonholed as a banker for life (I've seen very few MDs go on to do something else besides banking). Every year I could hang on in banking before reaching that "point of no return" yielded big bonuses that would pad my  nest egg, and allow me to take a risk and/or reduction in compensation when I moved in-house.

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
  • 1
 
Nov 23, 2020 - 10:41am

 

How much have you saved? Thinking of a post mba IBD career. 

Low seven figures, most of which was accumulated in the late VP/Director years.

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
 
Nov 23, 2020 - 5:42pm

thebrofessor

bravo, thank you for your insights, I had a feeling the political back and forth distracted from the nice, thoughtful person I always thought you were, you proved me right. I'd love to get a beer with you someday.

I'm curious about the cultural differences between IB and corpdev/in house work, any comments there?

My insights here impact my political insights, and vice versa. But I realize I could have made my political points the last few years in a more respectful tone :) Happy to grab a beer sometime, as I've enjoyed your posts over the years as well.

As for your question, I think there are two big changes:

1) Complete ownership of acquisitions, from the strategic fit, to post-merger integration and post-deal management. As a banker, you really don't care about who is buying or selling, so long as the deal closes and you get your transaction success fee. This dynamic grew to bother me, as at times I felt that our incentives weren't aligned with our client, and I regularly jumped from deal to deal, industry to industry, without a change to wear the "strategy hat" long-term.

2) Culturally, it requires you to collaborate with a broader set of people and personalities, with various motivations and ideas of work/life balance. Everyone in banking looks the same and is motivated by that six/seven figure bonus check. In a way, it's refreshing to see people care about things in life besides money, but can also be tougher to get people to grind for a pressing deadline, where there was no such concern in IB.

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
  • 2
 
Nov 25, 2020 - 5:42pm

If you have to have people grind for pressing deadlines in the first place, it means somewhere along the chain of command someone didn't plan, order, and execute things properly. Banking is notoriously filled with terrible managers and planners. Things that supposedly are always high priority from a VP and MD literally could've been done in a week and had no reason to be rushed in the first place. But that's sales for you in a dying/shrinking industry.

 
  • Associate 2 in IB - Ind
Nov 25, 2020 - 6:37pm

Appreciate the color here. I'm nearing 7 years in IB / IB-related roles and beginning to think hard on my long term career move. You hit home on a couple points that have been in the back of my head.

It's all about closing the deal. Doesn't matter if it's the right deal. There have been times where we have delivered the greatest return for investors, but left the management team with a new owner that we ultimately knew wasn't the right fit. The thrill of closing a deal used to mask this, but it's becoming more clear this isn't the career for me.

 
Nov 25, 2020 - 9:26am

@Jamie_Diamond pretty interesting how you shit all over my leaving banking post and criticized me for summing up the banking industry calling me a so called expert, yet here we have a senior banker with 10 years exp saying exactly the same stuff that I said. Makes you wonder, no?

 
Nov 25, 2020 - 9:04pm

TY OP Happy Thanksgiving!

"Full speed ahead, damn the torpedoes." -U.S. Navy General Farragut
 
Nov 27, 2020 - 11:25am

Legit post telling how it really is... I did the same and experienced the same. Truth is that in IB, the best bankers are great salesmen. The smartest guys are usually the worst bankers because they find it hard to bring in and close business. Name of the game is hustle and close by any means necessary. 

 
Nov 27, 2020 - 1:05pm

BrokerJoker

Legit post telling how it really is... I did the same and experienced the same. Truth is that in IB, the best bankers are great salesmen. The smartest guys are usually the worst bankers because they find it hard to bring in and close business. Name of the game is hustle and close by any means necessary. 

Funny you say that..MDs always said I'd make a better buy-side sponsor guy than sell-side banker. I struggled to always pretend to be an industry expert in everything in front of clients, and there was a very fine line between lying and "putting a positive spin" on a dogshit company we were selling that I wasn't always willing to cross. IB is sales.

when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
 
Nov 27, 2020 - 1:02pm

Reposting my comments about the almighty Exit Ops that were buried in a reply thread above:

 

I think the types of roles are similar when leaving IB after 3 years or 10, but the level at which you enter can vary. A 10-year IB veteran can exit to lead an in-house M&A team, whereas a IB analyst can exit to work on in-house M&A team reporting up to the group lead. Senior bankers may also be able to make the rare jump right into the C-suite (usually CFO), but I've only seen this happen where a banker went to work for their former client (and thus there was already mutual comfort in making the big jump into CFO).

Here's a sample of roles I interviewed for/received offers over the last year:

  • Head of global M&A for a rarely-acquisitive family-owned large diversified industrials company
  • #3 on the M&A team of a highly-acquisitive professional services publicly-traded company
  • CFO for a private equity backed distribution company
  • VP of Growth Finance for a unicorn services company
  • Various roles to lead M&A for private-equity backed portfolio companies
  • Hybrid investment professional/portfolio operational finance for a family office's portfolio
when you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression
  • 1
 
Nov 27, 2020 - 4:16pm

Thank you for sharing! This is a great reminder to all of us to reflect on what ladder we are climbing. As a young professional, I feel a little more hopeful to read this post. I realize that there are still (a few) people up the food chain who care. Some bosses just seem so rude and unforgiving that it's unbelievable. It's sad that IB is so grueling that many talented people have to leave the industry. Will IB be a more sustainable and less grueling career choice someday?

Start Discussion

Popular Content See all

IB Sucks. I'm out
+91IBby 1st Year Analyst in Investment Banking - Generalist">Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
IB is not intellectually challenging
+55IBby Intern in Investment Banking - Mergers and Acquisitions">Intern in IB-M&A
Janet Yellen - Unrealized Capital Gains Tax. WTF
+27OFFby 1st Year Analyst in Investment Banking - Generalist">Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
VP Lying
+24IBby Prospective Monkey in Investment Banking - Mergers and Acquisitions">Prospect in IB-M&A

Total Avg Compensation

January 2021 Investment Banking

  • Director/MD (9) $911
  • Vice President (31) $349
  • Associates (141) $232
  • 2nd Year Analyst (88) $152
  • 3rd+ Year Analyst (19) $150
  • Intern/Summer Associate (91) $144
  • 1st Year Analyst (351) $132
  • Intern/Summer Analyst (299) $82

Leaderboard See all

1
LonLonMilk's picture
LonLonMilk
98.5
2
Jamoldo's picture
Jamoldo
98.4
3
Secyh62's picture
Secyh62
98.3
4
CompBanker's picture
CompBanker
97.9
5
redever's picture
redever
97.7
6
frgna's picture
frgna
97.6
7
Edifice's picture
Edifice
97.5
8
Addinator's picture
Addinator
97.5
9
NuckFuts's picture
NuckFuts
97.5
10
bolo up's picture
bolo up
97.5