1st Year CRE Research Analyst - Skills for Growth

QuickMath's picture
Rank: Chimp | 6

Hey all, I'm building a list of skills to move my career forward and taking general advice while I'm at it. Some personal background:

  • ~1 year experience as Research Analyst at top CRE Brokerage, non-gateway but major market (think Houston, Miami, Seattle etc.)
  • Studied Economics at target school, aimed for academia but pivoted late for $. Received light IB interest, made final round at top HF (research background, perfect SAT), but relegated to RE due to poor grades
  • Family has low socioeconomic status, so few connections and slim odds of becoming a broker, also clock's ticking on making that $$$

Given my background, what skills should I learn to maximize my value? I'm thinking Research -> Valuations -> Acquisitions, but I'm having trouble gauging my worth in RE. I'm not even wedded to RE long term, and dream of someday joining a global macro discretionary HF. I also want to move to NYC soon.

I bought Geltner and Miller's CRE Analysis and Investments, do I read it front to back? Do I learn ARGUS? Do I network (not my strong suit) like crazy?

Thank you all for your guidance.

Comments (4)

Jul 9, 2019

It sounds like you really would not like Acquisitions if you do not like to network with people. If you dream of joining a global macro discretionary HF, I am not the guy who knows how to get you there.

However, my best would be move to Equity Research at Green Street, then use an MBA to pivot to a research role somewhere else. Green Street is well respected and analyze a ton of REITs and macro trends. Trepp is another option if debt is your thing too.

    • 2
Jul 9, 2019

I would get Argus certified and build the strongest set of modeling tools you can. With your math proficiency, you would make a strong REPE, Development, or Capital Markets brokerage Analyst. Focus on development project budgeting, draw schedules, waterfall modeling, tax incentive financing, etc... Tackle the more difficult concepts.

You can make good money in brokerage (good not great) without having to network by becoming a go-to analyst then execution broker (Director level) at an institutional brokerage shop.

    • 1
Most Helpful
Jul 10, 2019

Just a couple of notes here:

QuickMath:

perfect SAT

Holy shit. Pretty impressive.

QuickMath:

but relegated to RE due to poor grades

Real estate isn't a "relegation." It isn't the minor leagues.

QuickMath:

Family has low socioeconomic status, so few connections and slim odds of becoming a broker

Few connections for your father, sure, but that's not you. You're fully capable of making your own connections and becoming a broker if that's what you want.

QuickMath:

also clock's ticking on making that $$$

Not really. Especially in real estate.

QuickMath:

Given my background, what skills should I learn to maximize my value? I'm thinking Research -> Valuations -> Acquisitions, but I'm having trouble gauging my worth in RE. I'm not even wedded to RE long term, and dream of someday joining a global macro discretionary HF. I also want to move to NYC soon.

If you're not wedded to RE and dream of non-RE jobs, you should probably get out of RE.

QuickMath:

I bought Geltner and Miller's CRE Analysis and Investments, do I read it front to back?

Back to front is how we do it in this business

QuickMath:

Do I learn ARGUS?

If you want to stay in RE, yes. I'm not sure you do though.

QuickMath:

Do I network (not my strong suit) like crazy?

Yes. This is going to be important no matter what role you get, real estate or not. This is also, from your post, by far the most beneficial skill you can learn for growth.

    • 5
Jul 14, 2019
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