10/21/07

Can anyone tell me the basics about Accenture (Management)? Interview process, culture, compensation, employee outlook, etc.? Also, I'm not so clear on how Accenture splits Strategy and Management consulting. It seems that Strategy is under Management, but the website also suggests that they're different. Thanks for the help.

Comments (29)

11/17/07

Accenture is more operational consulting than it is strategy oriented. They like to differentiate themselves from more strategic oriented firms such as McKinsey in that they propose to not only develop the strategy, but to pro-actively implement the change within the operational aspect of the business. I only made first rounds with them, but first interview is very basic, they just go over your resume. I would recommend that you know at least the basics of ERP and SAP just to get a feel for the company. Second-round interviews is where you'll have the case analysis and there's also third rounds. When I was talking to the other consultants there they really loved their jobs, but I've heard large consulting firms can get pretty bureaucratic compared to the smaller ones. Hope it helps.

Management Consulting Interview Course

11/19/07

Basically out of 150,000 employees, 13,000 are in Management Consulting, of which 1000 are in Strategy. Strategy is definitely hard to get in, and without top MBA or ivy undergrad, etc., the chances are slim to none. All of Management Consulting has a very strong IT slant.

Only Strategy has case interviews, rest don't.

For the other streams, first round is get to know you, why you want to do consulting, etc. Second round is more like "Tell me one time when you ...". Third round is in office with Senior Managers and Executives. Mix of first two rounds, nothing out of the ordinary. You are expected to have good questions to ask. If you make it to Final round, its your offer to lose. Note that this may not be true for Strategy.

11/19/07

One of the PM at the HF I interned with this summer was a former Accenture guy before moving to the HF world. All I know is that he hated the culture and couldn't wait to get out. Was not a fan of it. But I'm sure there are former Accenture people that would say otherwise, that was just one man's opinion.

11/19/07

I have yet to meet someone who works or has worked at Accenture who enjoyed it.

11/19/07

I have yet to meet someone who works or has worked at Accenture who enjoyed it. Also I have yet to hear of Accenture winning a strategy engagement in all the proposals I have been involved in or know about.

11/19/07

Accenture is generally weaker in strategy, but they often make it up on price. During my time at MBB, I can recall several occasions where Accenture won a bakeoff based on their lower pricing (although this was more common for longer term, ops-focused cases than it was for strategy projects).

11/20/07

yeah that is probably true, but for those short 3 week blitz packages or the C-level stuff, clients usually go with the quals.

2/15/08

any more info?

Management Consulting Interview Course

11/27/10

How has the reputation of Accenture Management Consulting risen or fallen the past few years? What's future outlook?

Only concerned with MC/Strategy Practice, not IT or Systems

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11/28/10

It's a different ball game to the strat houses. In fact mostly it's implementation work.

Accenture's work is split roughly:
- 60% technology implementation
- 30% outsourcing
- 10% strategy

Outsourcing is apparently the fastest-growing segment.

If you're joining, be very careful that you're actually getting aligned to strategy. And even if you are, be aware that it might not be quite like it is at MBB or similar.

In terms of career stats, I would say:

  • interview process: extremely simple compared to the strat firms
  • remuneration: good but lower than at MBB, almost all 2nd tier (OW, LEK, ATK, RB, etc) houses, and almost all boutiques.
  • work/life balance: not much better than the above alternatives
  • culture: very competitive and quite pressured, staff are 'laddered' and ranked in order based on performance, with the bottom segment given the boot. People can still be nice and good fun, though.
  • brand: quite bad within consulting, not that bad outside
  • prospects: good MBA entry is not impossible, but harder than at MBB or others. Moving internally to other consulting firms may not be easy. Most common exit route appears to be getting poached by one of your clients to work internally with them
11/28/10

Thanks Bramlow! Anyone familiar with Accenture Management Consultants (NOT systems/tech/outsourcing)? What schools did they go to? Lot of targets or state schools?

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12/1/10

for MC, i've met people from Northwestern, Stanford, Yale, Michigan, Duke, Columbia, Wake Forest, UVA, etc. Probably top 25 schools?

12/2/10

Andersen Consulting, as in Arthur Andersen.

12/2/10

No, this is more of a back office type position with no client interaction

12/2/10

Hey!

Thanks for replying. Is Big 4 Advisory Front Office then?

12/2/10

Yes, anything that is client facing is FO

12/2/10

Also you get paid less than the consulting staff and may work longer hours.

12/2/10

Yes,they hire people with work experience (2 to 3 years even) as entry level hires. But the catch is they typically want engineering or science majors. You also have to relate your work experience (in this case teaching) to meet their expectations. I'm sure you can spin your story somehow.

12/2/10

pretty sure they take anyone. big firms with high turnover rates need to hire A LOT of people...

12/2/10

Any advice for a 2011 grad, currently working but not in consulting, for getting in the door? I know the website posts openings but that seems like a black hole.

12/2/10

applying online isn't the end of the world, but Accenture has 100k+ employees, do you really not know 1 of them? An internal referral is a really easy way to get an interview.

12/2/10

Do big firms really take anyone for entry level positions I've been emailing with some alumni at PwC/Deloitte and they're all saying that they mostly take undergrads/MBA students for entry-level hires, the rest are mainly laterals from relevant industries...

So while I don't know any of the Accenture employs personally there seems to be a lot of alumni working at Accenture, do you have any recommendations for asking them for an employee referral without just coming out and asking them directly in the initial cold email?

Thanks so much for the help guys

12/2/10

Firms definitely take Master's degree hires and people who have worked post bachelor's/master's for 2 to 3 years. To approach an alumni, say you're interested in their firm and offer to take one out to lunch. Ask them about the job and then ask for a referral or put in a word for you to HR. Do you have on campus recruiting at your old college? Maybe contact the campus recruiter.

12/2/10

Is it considered normal/acceptable to just straight up ask them for a referral, or is that more the type of thing that they should volunteer?

Do most take people who have worked post bachelors for 2/3 years even if the previous job was completely unrelated to business/consulting (i.e. teaching)?

12/2/10

You can ask them at the end. no harm no foul. Relevant experience is not necessary for an entry level position. It's not common to see 2-3 years of experience in another field, but be able to articulate why you want to go into consulting now.

12/2/10
12/2/10
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