Are any finance jobs both quant AND client-facing?

I'm still at university atm and have done a couple of internships so far, one in banking and the other on the buy side in more of a quant role. I enjoyed my time in both of these and felt that in a full time role I'd ideally want a job that combined aspects of both, where it's external facing/involves talking to clients to do deals, networking/socialising etc while also involving some degree of quant work where I'm still getting to do coding/modelling/data science.

Does this type of role exist in finance?? I feel like if I fully committed to either path I'd end up missing the aspects of the other job that I'm not experiencing - don't want to end up never talking to people outside my team/company but also don't want to abandon the quant side of things.

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Comments (15)

  • Analyst 1 in AM - Equities
Apr 6, 2021 - 6:57pm

Senior Trader in S&T has the ability to interact with clients himself. I would focus on landing internships though. 

Apr 7, 2021 - 5:42pm

Yeah it was a shop among the typical big names like that. That's true about the money side of things, but at the same time I kinda felt like I could relate to the banking crowd a bit more since they were more outgoing etc. so just not sure if I'd get tired of being in that more "academic" environment at a quant shop, hence wanting some external interaction as well.

Apr 7, 2021 - 7:52pm

ElongatedMuskrat_

Yeah it was a shop among the typical big names like that. That's true about the money side of things, but at the same time I kinda felt like I could relate to the banking crowd a bit more since they were more outgoing etc. so just not sure if I'd get tired of being in that more "academic" environment at a quant shop, hence wanting some external interaction as well.

Choose wisely.

If you still liked the quant side of things, you'll make more money and work on more interesting problems that way.

"Academic" environment doesn't always mean less out going. Just depends on the firm culture or culture of your team.

If you're interested in a unique role in finance that involves quantitative research while still having some "clinet facing" role, DM me. We build AI systems. And because we're a small team, we have to talk to lots of internal and external clients ourselves (bit of sales here and there).

Exit ops to buy side Quant roles and typical DS roles.

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Apr 6, 2021 - 8:33pm

Client facing usually comes with high seniority. 

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  • Managing Director in S&T - Other
Apr 7, 2021 - 6:50pm

Think you are confusing "job role" and "environment". There is a major difference between simple data science and quant work.

You basically dont want to be stuck in a corner all day coding in silence, solving algos on your own. Interacting with your team only via presentations and review of backtests.

You want to be in an environment where people are louder, discussing ideas, cracking jokes, go for drinks etc...

Anyways...you want to aim for an exotics desk at a bank or "desk strategist" role in ficc. Yes lots of quant and coding and a different environment.

  • Managing Director in S&T - Other
Apr 7, 2021 - 10:01pm

So typically in todays automated world. The more junior staff will have some knowledge of databases and python (traders). There will a specific group assigned to help manage, scrape, build dashboards for the trade desks. So one end is the trader other end is IT. The role created in between is an extension of like "desk economist". 

So the strategist is expected to have an understanding of the business and to have superior quant/coding skills to anyone on the desk. Their job will consist of helping build the "correct" dashboards. Doing backtests/research to update and create new valuation models. Using various machine learning tools to explain market moves and forecast upcoming market moves. Some desks will also ask you to build automated trading models to test liquidity, porftolio hedging, etc.. 

If the desk is more of a prop feel to it. The strategist will then mainly focused on using big data/ML to create models to help find alpha and identify trades, that is the best job as a strategist (not many out there these days).

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