Are rich people ruining America?

Hey monkeys,

Just like the title says, are rich people ruining America? The article claims that the future potential of the children of low-income Americans are being diminished by upper-middle-class Americans.

Why?

Apparently this stems from residential zoning restrictions.

Well-educated people tend to live in places like Portland, New York, and San Francisco that have housing and construction rules that keep the poor and less educated away from places with good schools and good job opportunities.

Also, he shares a story.

Recently I took a friend with only a high school degree to lunch. Insensitively, I led her into a gourmet sandwich shop. Suddenly I saw her face freeze up as she was confronted with sandwiches named "Padrino" and "Pomodoro" and ingredients like soppressata, capicollo and a striata baguette. I quickly asked her if she wanted to go somewhere else and she anxiously nodded yes and we ate Mexican.

The above anecdote was sort of confusing to me at first; I didn't quite grasp the significance of it, but I think that he is trying to show that a less educated person (his friend) is "separated" from the world of the wealthy.

So, do you think that rich people are ruining America?
What do you think the point of the anecdote is?

Comments (117)

Jul 15, 2017

It's not the rich people that have run up $20 trillion in debt and $120 trillion in unfunded liabilities - those are politicians who've ruined the country. Rich people, the private sector, have survived in spite of the aforementioned jackasses and provided immense opportunity to people. So no, the people investing and creating jobs aren't ruining America, the people bankrupting the next six generations to buy votes are.

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Jul 15, 2017

They dont actually run the country but they can heavily influence political decisions via lobbyists.

Best Response
Jul 15, 2017

Reading the NYTimes. Your first mistake.

People ruining this country are the politicians plain and simple. The wealthy pay the vast majority of the taxes in this country. That revenue goes to the government where it is pissed away. Blaming the rich because poor people choose base pleasure over learning is a scape goat.

Ask yourself this. Millions of poor Chinese and Indians come to the US. They work hard, get an education (while often living in poor and horrible areas) and seem to do fine. Yet Americans, already speaking English, knowing the system, cannot do the same with the same resources. Yeah, 'nuff said.

Jul 19, 2017
TNA:

Ask yourself this. Millions of poor Chinese and Indians come to the US. They work hard, get an education (while often living in poor and horrible areas) and seem to do fine. Yet Americans, already speaking English, knowing the system, cannot do the same with the same resources. Yeah, 'nuff said.

Finally someone gets it. This applies to immigrants in general IMO. They come to this country seeking a good education to be able to access better opportunities than what they had in their own home country, often performing jobs on the side that we ourselves don't want to do. Despite cultural differences, they are able to learn and utilize the great resources we have in this country to become successful. But then when they do become successful, Americans get jealous as a result and bitch about how globalization is bad and that they are taking over, etc etc. No, if you recognized the resources that you have at your disposal and stop doing dumb shit then you'll sure of a hell of a better chance of being successful, if not greater than those coming into this country.

I've seen this firsthand. My parents are not from this country. My mom did not even go to college. Yet she was able to work hard, successfully start a business and is making so much more than the majority of a lot of people. It's about realizing that success requires working hard and that you may have to forgo certain luxuries in your life temporarily to reach it.

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Jul 19, 2017

agreed! +1

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Jul 19, 2017

You're talking to the wrong person, he hates America's current immigration laws. Also, this statement is without nuance, many Indians and Chinese that come over are poor relative to Americans but they may already have been former professionals or children of professionals. This dynamic instills a natural inclination towards education. This is certainly my case, I am sure I appear to be a "poor immigrant" who came over when I was young but my dad was a lawyer in our home country and my mom was a teacher, they quickly got educated and certified here in those respective professions and instilled the same value for education in us, so statistically I am a poor immigrant that used the benefits of 'Merican education to better my situation but in reality that's 1/2 the story at best. Comparing that to American poor whose grandparents may have been subsistence farmers and parents (if they have two) may be house maids is disingenuous. Plain and simple. Statistically my parents likely made roughly the same income as the American poor but that is only 1/2 the story, at best. Idk why I even bothered to post this, it should be obvious to anyone thinking beyond the surface level.

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Jul 19, 2017

Nah ik who I'm talking to and I never said our immigration laws were perfect. But you do bring up some valid points.

Jul 15, 2017

Don't bother man. Dude ain't woke. It's ok though. Excuses don't make you more money or improve your life. And honestly, no one really cares anymore.

Jul 19, 2017

+1SB for truth. I know how people love the model minority stereotype. But look at Nigerian Americans today

Jul 15, 2017

Typical bullshit from you.

1) I 100% support legal immigration.

2) I 100% am against illegal immigration

I've had an ex GF not be able to get jobs because she couldn't get sponsored and she almost had to leave the country. One of my closest friends lost 3 job opportunities and needed up leaving the US because he couldn't get sponsored.

No one crys for them because they aren't a large ethnic group the poverty pimps can exploit.

And you make excuses. We have free k-12. Amazing libraries, museums and the like. The worlds information can be held on a phone. Yet Americans of all races can't be bothered to do anything but candy crush.

FYI - Indians are still held as indentured servants in parts of India. They also have a caste system. Oh and thgod a Chinese were used as slave labor in the USA. Japanese were put into internment camps during WWII.

Strang, I don't hear excuses being made for their lack of education and success. Oh that's right, they don't let historical injustice prevent them from reading a book and working a job.

Jul 19, 2017

"Indians are still held as indentured servants in parts of India. They also have a caste system"

No idea what this has to do with current Indian immigrants, unless you're implying they are a bunch of former indentured servants.

"Chinese were used as slave labor in the USA. Japanese were put into internment camps during WWII "

Fair statement, but a majority of Asian immigration is after these periods, and a majority of that is educated immigration. There is simply no disputing this. There is a reason Koreans earn the highest income, on average, of all the Asian groups. There is a reason Cambodians earn the least income, on average, of all the Asian groups. One group consisted of educated immigration and the other group consisted of a bunch of refugees, a lot of which were uneducated and have passed that down to the next generation. You can also look it up where, even back then, they were looked at as a cut above African immigrants in society. You look at these as excuses, I look at it as much needed nuance that stimulates actual discussion. No way we solve a lot of the ills of society and of the poor if we simply attack these people and continue to push myths, which is part of the problem.

Everyone is against illegal immigration, the question is how do we treat the ones that are already here and made a fair living here. I am also for expanding legal immigration.

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Jul 15, 2017

So you deliberately try and make me out to be anti immigrant when you know my stance.

You deport people who are hear illegally. Let them apply to come back. Blame the states and liberals who made it easy for them to stay and break the law.

Why is the plight of Indians or asians relevant? Because you bring up historic injustices against certain people as an excuse for today's behavior or educational issues. My stance is that history doesn't prevent someone from improving themselves. I provided three examples of historic injustice not inhibiting people from raising up.

Reality is people have simply moved on. Both parties don't really care either. No one is attacking anyone. I'm attacking piss poor rationale for not working or reading. I'm also attacking illegal immigration which lowers wages and takes jobs that these disenfranchised Americans could do.

Jul 19, 2017

Why should exceptions have to be made? Fact of the matter is that illegal immigrants took the risk to come into this country knowing they were doing so illegally. There are consequences to this. I am sure that many are coming here to make a decent living and provide better opportunities for their children. But then when they are causing trouble and then they are discovered to be illegal then what? To let them stay would be a dangerous precedent. On Twitter and other forms of social media I see those on the left trying to find some rational way to justify it such as, "Oh what about white people coming here and taking land from Native Americans" and similar ilk.

Jul 19, 2017
TNA:

Typical bullshit from you.

1) I 100% support legal immigration.

2) I 100% am against illegal immigration

I've had an ex GF not be able to get jobs because she couldn't get sponsored and she almost had to leave the country. One of my closest friends lost 3 job opportunities and needed up leaving the US because he couldn't get sponsored.

And you make excuses. We have free k-12. Amazing libraries, museums and the like. The worlds information can be held on a phone. Yet Americans of all races can't be bothered to do anything but candy crush.

FYI - Indians are still held as indentured servants in parts of India. They also have a caste system. Oh and thgod a Chinese were used as slave labor in the USA. Japanese were put into internment camps during WWII.

Strang, I don't hear excuses being made for their lack of education and success. Oh that's right, they don't let historical injustice prevent them from reading a book and working a job.

Illegal immigration does more harm than good. There is no true way to justify it. But this post is great. Especially the last point, that is something URM, but more specifically the black community here in America needs to understand.

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Jul 15, 2017

Every stat shows that Americans with a high school education or below have been left behind with this economic faux rebound. Illegal immigrants take jobs that these lesser educated Americans could do. They also lower wages.

And not every job is picking fruit. Plenty of illegals work in kitchens, do contraction, clean houses, etc. All Jobs that would get done with Americans with higher wages.

Simply ask a Democrat what would happen if there were no illegals. "Your salad would cost 20 bucks!!"

Exactly. It would cost more money because the price the market would demand to slave in a field is higher than what farmers pay illegals.

I'll happily pay 20 bucks for an American to work. And I'm absolutely not a Dem.

Jul 15, 2017

Every stat shows college educated Americans are doing just fine. The people who aren't studied majors that have low salaries or aren't in demand. Immigrants aren't taking their jobs.

Illegals ARE taking jobs from low educated Americans.

Makes no sense to educated the theoretical best of the world and send them home. You want to have caps or something like that, fine, but we want these people.

When college educated unemployment increases, I'll agree with you. But not right now.

Jul 19, 2017

You're clearly a conservative, but you're playing by an outdated rule book.

Not everyone is cut-out for college education in the first place; that doesn't mean we should throw them to the wolves. I can't wait for the myth of "muh college degree" to finally fall by the wayside, as a large swath of 100 IQ +/- 10pts Americans shouldn't be going to college in the first place, because these people just end up with debt and 4-6 wasted years. America should have continued to provide working-class opportunities for this group, but due to globalization this group was basically given a gigantic middle-finger.

As well, to your other point, even college educated wages have remained relatively stagnant over the last generation. We don't need to keep educating the world, with exceptions made for truly elite people, and bringing people to America whom will only compete with the native stock.

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Jul 15, 2017

Thanks for clarifying what I am. Appreciate it.

We should be reducing corporate taxes and regulations and offering incentives to bring back US manufacturing. We should be stopping illegal immigration so wages will increase and jobs will become available.

But if you think stopping foreigners from getting college degrees is going to make accounting firms hire high schools grads you are nuts.

If you want college educated wages to increase you need to destroy this idea that college is a time for fun and exploration. People need to learn skills that are employable. Don't blame a Chinese kids learning engineering for wage stagnation because you have a bunch of women's studies kids graduating.

Jul 19, 2017

On this note I will agree with you, there is a noticeable skill gap between immigrants who get an education here and Americans who get an education here. Immigrants fill the STEM majors while Americans fill the arts fields. Guess which skills are more in demand? Additionally, our stagnant productivity has been a problem for ~20 years and that is a big reason why GDP and wage growth is where it is at now. I actually think robots will increase human productivity and it will be a net gain for everyone overall.

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Jul 19, 2017

You're still thinking like a cuck, with the whole "bootstraps" ideology.

Stop blaming women's study majors (a point on which I do agree), but instead start asking why this "college for everybody" mantra got rolled out in the first place. It's due to the increasingly competitive, hostile and winner-take-all system that increased globalization and immigration has brought forth over the last few generations. 50 years ago your average state-school engineering grad would have been able to afford a home, a couple cars, and a family all on one income, but these days that's a pipe-dream unless living in a very low COL area. Why does nobody ask themselves why this is? Do you think an increasingly hostile and competitive culture, even starting before middle school now, has been good for America? Do you think increased college debt and stagnant bachelor educated wages has been good for America?

IMO these questions deserve answers.

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Jul 15, 2017

1) the world has become more complex.

2) people have always wanted to go to college, but it used to be only for the wealthy.

3) wages have stagnated because you have a) a financially engineered recovery, b) a blend of low value Degrees diluting things and c) companies have gotten more efficient with things.

The world has become more competitive since the golden years of the 50s. Europe was destroyed, communism was rising, Japan was nuked, Korea was a mess and china was sending their educated to the farms. How you can't see the night and day differences is beyond me.

Furthermore, internationals who come to the US to study and focusing on majors that most Americans don't go into. The pre college education system of china, India, Eastern Europe, etc focus on math and science. The US is relatively weak with these. Hence foreigners going into STEM fields and Americans going into softer majors and enjoying the "college experience "

BTW - we already have a H1B Visa lottery so we do send a shit ton back.

Jul 19, 2017

@TNA

I don't know what you have been reading, but there is an overabundance of home grown STEM talent already in the USA. We don't need more Chinese, EE and Indian engineers, software developers and doctors. If you break down math and science standardized testing in the US by racial demographics, what you find might surprise you.

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Jul 15, 2017

Someone with an engineering degree from a state school can easily make 50-60k starting out from school in a low COL area. Assuming them work for a number of years and have a family when they are mid to late 20s, they can easily own a house, have a car and a family.

I think the 50s were glamorized a little two much. Middle class people weren't graduating high school and eating lobster with a penthouse in Manhattan. They lived in tiny little towns, had a small house, owned two fords and ate cold cuts.

Jul 19, 2017
TNA:

Someone with an engineering degree from a state school can easily make 50-60k starting out from school in a low COL area. Assuming them work for a number of years and have a family when they are mid to late 20s, they can easily own a house, have a car and a family.

I think the 50s were glamorized a little two much. Middle class people weren't graduating high school and eating lobster with a penthouse in Manhattan. They lived in tiny little towns, had a small house, owned two fords and ate cold cuts.

I explicitly stated low COL areas as an exception, and I said none of the sort about middle-class people living like they were rich 50 years ago. I honestly don't know how you interpret my statements this way.

Please go down in the thread to read what else I've written.

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Jul 15, 2017

You compare the living standard in the 50s to current day. That's how I'm getting that interpretation.

And the people in the 50s lived in Low COL areas. The whole interstate system was build to benefit suburbia. Only recently have educated and well off people wanted to live in urban environments (which were always where poor or recent immigrants lived).

Jul 19, 2017

50-60k is underpaid for an engineer

Jul 19, 2017
Pmc2ghy:

cuckservatism

Do you expect people to take you seriously, whatsoever?

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Jul 19, 2017

@CRE

Thanks for the insight. There's probably nothing of substance in any of my posts while you have provided fantastic thoughts in this thread such as "West Coast NIMBYs =/= all rich people".

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Jul 19, 2017

Ant - you're leaving out so much context and information in your comparison of Asian- vs black Americans.

Asian-Americans as a whole have the highest average household incomes of any large racial group (white, black, Hispanic whether white or black), but there is a vast difference between those with Chinese or Indian roots vs Cambodian or Hmong ones. Something like a third of Hmong-American families live below the poverty line. Chinese and Indian families, meanwhile, tend to be more likely to have relatively recently immigrated, with their predecessors being well-educated engineers and the like, and this shows in their ability to claw their way to the upper middle class.

Nigerian-Americans and Ghanaian-Americans whose families were recent immigrants are also doing relatively well, and actually have higher median household incomes than the average white household. The average black household who have slaves for ancestors, though, are at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to incomes.

There is one clear explanation for this - that socioeconomic class is "sticky". There is overwhelmingly strong evidence that this is true. Whether or not this is a problem is arguably debatable, and if it is a problem, what the solutions are is definitely debatable, but either way you shouldn't be using the success of Asian-American families to show that anyone can get rich in America.

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Jul 15, 2017

This is a debate not an essay. I agree, lots of nuance. I'm simply stating that plenty of poor foreigners seem to be able to come here and find success with the tools available. Yet many Americans can't do the same.

Class is sticky, but it's relatively easy to be a "success". Don't have kids early, don't get arrested and graduate high school.

Plain fact is success in life is largely doing simple things correctly.

Jul 19, 2017

It is precisely my point that "poor foreigners" by and large CAN'T just come here and be successful. Foreigners who were (relatively) rich come here and do well. Foreigners who were poor don't.

Jul 19, 2017
Angus Macgyver:

Nigerian-Americans and Ghanaian-Americans whose families were recent immigrants are also doing relatively well, and actually have higher median household incomes than the average white household. The average black household who have slaves for ancestors, though, are at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to incomes.

+1 because you mentioned Ghana. This is a fact. I also must say that there is a difference between Africans in this country here today who had parents that recently immigrated than black people who had slaves for ancestors and have been stuck in poverty for many years. The reason why a lot of Africans immigrate to this country and especially among Ghanaians and Nigerians is that the opportunities here are significantly better than back home.

Jul 19, 2017

Ghanaian immigrant here. This is 100% accurate

Jul 19, 2017

Glad to know that there is a fellow Ghanaian on here.

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Jul 19, 2017
CreditMadrid:
TNA:

Ask yourself this. Millions of poor Chinese and Indians come to the US. They work hard, get an education (while often living in poor and horrible areas) and seem to do fine. Yet Americans, already speaking English, knowing the system, cannot do the same with the same resources. Yeah, 'nuff said.

Finally someone gets it. This applies to immigrants in general IMO. They come to this country seeking a good education to be able to access better opportunities than what they had in their own home country, often performing jobs on the side that we ourselves don't want to do. Despite cultural differences, they are able to learn and utilize the great resources we have in this country to become successful. But then when they do become successful, Americans get jealous as a result and bitch about how globalization is bad and that they are taking over, etc etc. No, if you recognized the resources that you have at your disposal and stop doing dumb shit then you'll sure of a hell of a better chance of being successful, if not greater than those coming into this country.

Lol.

So let me guess, Americans died in world wars to protect freedoms. They earned their freedoms. Now that the Liberal elite finds them ''expensive'' likes to call them lazy and deliberately imports immigrants to undercut wages as a ''thank you for dying in our wars''.

And if Americans dare to complain about that, then they are entitled, because having fought for freedoms makes you entitled. O-fucking-k.

The funny thing is that you guys don't even get that the Liberal fetishism for immigrants is simply exploitation. Oh no, you are proud of being exploited, but just like Liberals dumped the American working class when it's not longer of use, then they will dump you when you become ''too entitled'' as well. For now, they can just bribe your attention with token candidates like Obama and pretend they ''care about minorities''. Once robots are fully around, you'll see what happens. Immigrants will be on the same boat to hell with Steve the redneck. Because they are no longer needed. Be careful what you wish for.

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Jul 19, 2017

I don't know why you're so upset but it is a fact that many Americans are entitled and immigrants do not come in with that attitude which is why they outperform Americans. This can only be good for the country as a whole as we want highly motivated people pushing the country forward. What exactly makes Obama more of a "token" candidate than any other person that runs for president, the fact that he is black? Really want to understand your reasoning for that statement.

Jul 19, 2017

Because it's simply not true.

It's the tale by the smug Liberal to justify his exploitative system.

Honestly, if immigrants were so hard-working, then why can't they make the social conquests Americans did... in their own country?

Because it's easier to come to the US and take advantage of the social rights acquired by Americans. So who's the lazy and entitled one in the end? The one who fought and died for his freedoms or the one that left his country and took advantage of an already developed system? And I'm not saying that working 14 hours a day in a factory isn't hard work. However try to fight and die for your right to vote. Try to fight and die for the abolishment of class system.

So no, thanks. They really aren't ''more hard working''.

Even the purely economic argument doesn't work:

You are making excuses because you'd rather pay someone 1 Dollar a hour instead of 10. Which you have the right to, because it's your self interest, but at the same time it is not in the interest of the counterpart. No matter how much you call him lazy; that's not an argument.

If you bring the immigrant, then the American gets paid less or not at all. Then his self-interest says: vote against that. I'm not going on a full Marxist rant about the alleged merits of the working class. I'm going for the utilitarian explanation. They are worse off, then they vote against it. They have the right to. You want to call them lazy? That's fine, lose the election. Then call the Washington Post and blame Russia because you can't put yourself in someone else's shoes and see what's best for them.

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Jul 19, 2017

1.) What percentage Americans actually fight in wars? You keep using soldiers as a proxy for all Americans....
2.) Should a kid in America today feel more entitled to the benefits of being American than an immigrant just because his grandpa fought in WWII? If so, why do you think that?
3.) Are you implying that people uproot their entire lives and move to a foreign country to seek better lives are somehow cowards?

Immigrants gain further education, become more productive, and commit less crime than the average American, so it is absolutely not a myth that they are more hard working. This is good for America no matter how you slice it. One of our largest competitive advantages has always been immigration, idk why all of a sudden people want to end that.

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Jul 19, 2017

@BobTheBaker

So culture and history do not matter? Humans and populations are simply fungible entities? It's now the duty of America to provide opportunity and resources to every supposedly hardworking immigrant that wants to come to America, even before its native people; disregarding how immigration will change general society in America?

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Jul 19, 2017

America's culture is multiculturalism, why should that change now? Because white immigration has largely ended and immigration of a darker hue is what is now prevalent? I mean we weaved Italian/ Irish/ German culture into America, what is stopping us from weaving Indian/ African? It isn't about duty, America provided opportunities for those willing to work hard for it. As long as that is our mantra then we should welcome those willing to work hard for it and have the necessary skills we need.

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Jul 19, 2017

@BobTheBaker

If this is your view then we are at completely different ends of the ideological spectrum. I simply do not believe in the blank slate theorem of humans and culture. In general I believe too much multiculturalism is a disaster for society, leading to atomization, hostility, excessive competitiveness and a lack of societal trust and bonds.

I respect your view, but there is basically no way we will change each others' opinions, so its pointless.

Jul 19, 2017

Who are you to define too much culture? That's what I want to know. At every point in American history new immigrants have been treated like crap and their culture has been vilified. Then time goes on and their culture becomes part of American culture. We hated the Irish and now we enjoy St. Patrick's day like an American holiday. You may have a point if this were China but America has always and will always be a country defined by multiculturalism. It's a strength and part of why I love being here.

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Jul 19, 2017

@BobTheBaker

And who are you to say that we don't have enough, or even too much, culture?

Also, I'm not making shit up. There is plenty of relatively recent sociological and psychological research coming from very respected academics that make my exact points about the problems associated with too much multiculturalism. If you choose to debate their academic findings then okay, but don't remain with your head in the sand regarding the subject.

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Jul 19, 2017

Link the studies. I am not saying anything about culture, what I said is those that are ready to work hard and have the skills we need should be welcome regardless of culture because we have always been multicultural. You're the one that needs to prove we have too much culture since you are for blocking perfectly capable and value-add immigrants from America over culture.

Jul 19, 2017

@BobTheBaker

And what I'm saying is that culture and immigration are completely intertwined, even if you don't want it to be. We can't separate those facts, and a discussion of "are the perceived economic benefits of immigration worth the cultural and social downsides" needs to be taken more seriously in society.

From Robert Putnam of Harvard
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-...
Brian Barry's book, from Columbia
https://www.amazon.com/Culture-Equality-Egalitaria...
From Michigan State sociologists
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24198048
I can link to more when I have more time...

Jul 19, 2017

Literally from the summary of your first link:

In the long run immigration and diversity are likely to have important cultural, economic, fiscal, and developmental benefits. In the short run, however, immigration and ethnic diversity tend to reduce social solidarity and social capital. New evidence from the US suggests that in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods residents of all races tend to 'hunker down'. Trust (even of one's own race) is lower, altruism and community cooperation rarer, friends fewer. In the long run, however, successful immigrant societies have overcome such fragmentation by creating new, cross-cutting forms of social solidarity and more encompassing identities.

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Jul 19, 2017

@BobTheBaker

Thanks for reading all the studies jackass, and cherry picking something our of an entire study. You must still be a freshman in college.

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Jul 19, 2017

I'm at work right now but it isn't exactly a good look for your argument if, in the summary of the study you link to support your argument, it rejects your argument. I have no idea how referencing a summary can be considered "cherry-picking"... that is a contradiction.

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Jul 19, 2017

@BobTheBaker

I guess we should completely disregard the next few sentences, Putnam's follow up work (which you're clearly too lazy to research) and the context of the work considering he has to hedge his statements in a PC academic environment.

Jul 19, 2017

I didn't disregard shit. That is about the short-run, growing pains are to be expected. That has always been the case. What you are saying is immigration right now is an absolute negative, both in the short and long-run, the study clearly doesn't agree with you. American history doesn't agree with you. I could link studies supporting immigration as well. I'm moving on.

Jul 19, 2017

Yes, all cultures and all peoples are THE EXACT SAME. What a joke that anybody could honestly believe this, and then with a straight face disregard the brain drain that happens in the countries where people emigrate from.

Jul 19, 2017

nicca b on here all day. uncertified keyboard jockey

Jul 19, 2017

1) What about those who stayed at home and provided for those fighting at the front? War is a collective effort.
2) As long as he fights to preserves the rights acquired by his granpas, he deserves them. This is no entitlement.
3) What's the biggest effort? Fighting to earn your rights in your country or working 14 hours in a factory where rights are already acquired? I don't think anyone can be called lazy or coward for either of them. Still, which one requires the biggest effort?

And as long as the ''entitled American'' as you put it will be on the losing side, they'll keep voting against it. What you call collective good for America is essentially the extra Dollar for the exploiter, which isn't collective, nor objective. Distribution of GDP or even better, wealth, counts. What you are saying is that as long as GDP grows, then America is doing good. What I'm saying is that if the GDP growth goes all to the same restricted group of people, then the others are going to get pissed off.

So, yes, it does actually matter how you slice it, because what you just called good for America in the end is only good only for your slice, while others' slices shrink.

Jul 19, 2017

1.) Lol man we haven't had a major war in over 40 years, this new generation hasn't experienced anything like that. This isn't WWII where food was rationed and people worked longer hours to make bombs. Stop with the bullshit.

2.) What amount of fighting does the grandkid do? this shit is a joke man, it's all wrapped up in buzzwords. My cousin is an immigrant like me and is deployed in Afghanistan as we speak, the kids of Mexican immigrants make up a large portion of the military and many are troops that are in the shit rather than officers.

3.) Just because some dudes way back in the 1700s decided to rebel against England, it doesn't mean any American is fighting to earn those rights, most were born with those rights and don't do shit to fight for them, they expect them. They generally take them for granted whereas many immigrants are extremely appreciative and proud of the rights they are afforded as Americans. So your juxtaposition is garbage.

I suppose you are correct regarding distribution of GDP but, currently, the gains are going to the very rich and those who have the skills required in the modern world (many of which are immigrants as I previously alluded to). I am all for increasing taxes on the wealthy and spending that money on better entitlements but idk why the electrical engineer earning 100k that came from India to work hard for his education should be punished because some American kid feels he's entitled to those gains, despite the reality that they don't even want to be or make the effort to be an engineer.

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Jul 19, 2017

1-2-3) I'll actually agree with you that if modern Americans don't fight for their rights, and mostly they aren't, they are going to lose them. As for immigrants, depends. Mexicans tend to be rather appreciative. Muslims in Europe not so much. Plenty hate democracy, human rights and all that.

On the other element, I'd actually still prefer the standard free market way, which means no bailouts or shit like that. The idea that there's a government safety net... for the rich is ludicrous. This isn't free market, it's bizarro world socialism. You speak of wealth redistribution, but that has already happened from the poor to the rich, big time. You speak of high skilled people, but those are the ones that created subprime mortgage securities in a way that they'd bypass how rating agencies rate them, and then put leveraged bets on that. So if this is the ''expert'' then we have an ''expert'' problem, because the expert is a corrupt idiot, subsidized by the state, with whom he's in bed with.

And none of that has anything to do with Apu the Indian engineer getting 100k a year. Nobody is complaining about him. People complain about those brought in to prevent wage growth, after they had to bail out Joe the banker. So the problems are not Apu from India, or not even Diego from Mexico, he's merely a pawn of the game.

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May 5, 2018

slow clap ......bravo......... now THIS guy gets it.

May 5, 2018
neink:

Because it's simply not true.

It's the tale by the smug Liberal to justify his exploitative system.

Honestly, if immigrants were so hard-working, then why can't they make the social conquests Americans did... in their own country?

Because it's easier to come to the US and take advantage of the social rights acquired by Americans. So who's the lazy and entitled one in the end? The one who fought and died for his freedoms or the one that left his country and took advantage of an already developed system? And I'm not saying that working 14 hours a day in a factory isn't hard work. However try to fight and die for your right to vote. Try to fight and die for the abolishment of class system.

So no, thanks. They really aren't ''more hard working''.

Even the purely economic argument doesn't work:

You are making excuses because you'd rather pay someone 1 Dollar a hour instead of 10. Which you have the right to, because it's your self interest, but at the same time it is not in the interest of the counterpart. No matter how much you call him lazy; that's not an argument.

If you bring the immigrant, then the American gets paid less or not at all. Then his self-interest says: vote against that. I'm not going on a full Marxist rant about the alleged merits of the working class. I'm going for the utilitarian explanation. They are worse off, then they vote against it. They have the right to. You want to call them lazy? That's fine, lose the election. Then call the Washington Post and blame Russia because you can't put yourself in someone else's shoes and see what's best for them.

and now we have Ol' Donny

Jul 19, 2017
BobTheBaker:

I don't know why you're so upset but it is a fact that many Americans are entitled and immigrants do not come in with that attitude which is why they outperform Americans. This can only be good for the country as a whole as we want highly motivated people pushing the country forward.

My exact thoughts.

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Jul 15, 2017

No. Unless the person is using dishonest methods to get rich, she's actually one of the people keeping the country from getting ruined. Very rich citizens invest in education, health and scientific development. Rich investors help new companies and people with great ideas. Upper middle class people help the money go around, buying items that contribute to the rise of several industries across the country, which give jobs to lower class people. The only people that can ruin a country are corrupt individuals, who may be rich and powerful, but may also be poor and feeble.

"I'm into, uh, well, murders and executions, mostly."

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Jul 15, 2017
itriedtobecreative:

No. Unless the person is using dishonest methods to get rich, she's actually one of the people keeping the country from getting ruined. Very rich citizens invest in education, health and scientific development. Rich investors help new companies and people with great ideas. Upper middle class people help the money go around, buying items that contribute to the rise of several industries across the country, which give jobs to lower class people. The only people that can ruin a country are corrupt individuals, who may be rich and powerful, but may also be poor and feeble.

yeah I agree with this for the most part

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Jul 19, 2017

West Coast NIMBYs =/= all rich people

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Jul 19, 2017

"Hey everybody, look at how privileged this columnist for the NYT is, he can read Mexican."

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Jul 19, 2017

There's a section of the ultra rich that should have been bankrupt since 2007. Many of those, whose jobs and wealth has been subsidized by the US government ever since via bail outs and quantitative easing, now mock the average Trump voter that wants government intervention to prevent his job being offshored to Asia.

Now, those kind of the rich, and yes they reside mainly in NY, are the cancer that's killing America. The free market said it, they need to go, yet survive and look down upon others.

Very much like the average Liberal of Portland and San Francisco, all about socialism and yet live in ultra gentrified areas, overwhelmingly white too, because they love ''diversity'' as long as it's not in their neighbourhood. None of them would accept to permanently move to the average Latino or black ghetto.

On the other side, if somene built a business and became rich out of it, he's not really ruining anyone.

Gentrification is a problem because it's enforced by inheritors, not fortune makers.

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May 4, 2018
neink:

Gentrification is a problem because it's enforced by inheritors, not fortune makers.

Sorry for the bump but this quote pretty much sums up the entire issue. Take my SB m8

Jul 19, 2017

People who get ahead are going to try and stay ahead...how does someone fix this, do we all through our belongings in a pile and raffle them off? Not saying it's right, but what does someone expect.

And in a lot of ways, rich people ruin America the same way America ruins the rest of the world (not hating on America, just an observation)

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Jul 19, 2017

I don't think the point of his column is the fact that rich people exist, it's that the culture they tend to live in is something that is all exclusively reserved for them. That culture bleeds into significant life events that define how a child turns into an adult, and how an adult finds their place in society (rich/poor, skilled/unskilled, etc. etc.). So for someone who grew up poor but wants to get ahead, a lot of the chances he/she will get are slivers of open doors...that are much more open for kids of affluent backgrounds. Brooks is arguing the class division in America is stark and there's no hope to jump the fence.

Now, just out of curiosity, I'm going to ask you this question: Brooks says that 70% of students at top 200 schools come from the top 25% of wealth. Why do you think that is?

I'd like to hear people's opinion on that, not looking to argue, just curious where people would land on that.

Jul 19, 2017

Because culture is inherited. But I disagree that this article is to be taken as some negatively active occurrence in American fortunes. I think a biased mind will take the lefty position and try to blast the culture of wealthier people. But that is bullahit.

Jul 19, 2017

must be, that's why all those poor people are making Venezuela a top destination to live..

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Jul 19, 2017

Yes

Jul 19, 2017

Learn Italian, and you too can be a part of the echelon of society that frequents gourmet sandwich shops.

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Jul 19, 2017

+1

Jul 19, 2017

Or just learn how to read, I have been in maybe a handful of restaurants in my entire life that are in the US that don't have an English explanation for what a dish is. Of those that don't have this they all are run by those douchebags who moved to the states from French Canada.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

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Jul 19, 2017

I'm sorry but in my tenure on wall street, I've neither given nor received "define soppressata, capicollo and striata baguette" as an interview question before, nor do I know of anyone who has given or received that as an interview question

Jul 19, 2017

It's an analogy for don't be a dick.

Jul 15, 2017
Lizard Brain:

I'm sorry but in my tenure on wall street, I've neither given nor received "define soppressata, capicollo and striata baguette" as an interview question before, nor do I know of anyone who has given or received that as an interview question

Its an easy answer, anyway. "Yes, I know what they are, they are delicious."

/hired.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Jul 19, 2017

Brooks overblows cultural examples from East Coast intelligentsia like legacy admissions, David Foster Wallace, and intersectionality, as examples of "cultural codes" that the successful people must reach. In reality, the vast majority of highly successful Americans couldn't give less of a sh!t about any of it. That's because his view of what makes a successful American is so skewed.
Brooks doesn't realize that the successful people of most of America are the guys who bought a burger franchise in the 80s, or white trash guys who got their sh!t together and went to engineering school. Probably it's because he's never really left his coastal bubble, but it's what makes reading his columns so frustrating. He doesn't even know what he doesn't know, and so instead of exploring the country and figuring out what it's actually about, he sits back down in his leather armchair and drowns the rest of the world's idiocy out with a glass of brandy and a copy of Foucault's Discipline and Punishment.

Jul 19, 2017
Kboy86:

He doesn't even know what he doesn't know, and so instead of exploring the country and figuring out what it's actually about, he sits back down in his leather armchair and drowns the rest of the world's idiocy out with a glass of brandy and a copy of Foucault's Discipline and Punishment.

This is an excellent distillation of the frustration with elitism (social, intellectual, or otherwise). It's not even the differing viewpoints, it's the casual dismissal of any intellectual curiosity. If you've already decided the answer, then why bother?

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Jul 19, 2017

This comment cracked me up (by SB posted July 11 2017 and a Reader's Pick):

Recently I took a friend with doctoral degree to lunch. Insensitively I led him into a McDonalds. Suddenly I saw his face freeze up as he was confronted with menu items like "Hamburger" and "Fries" and ingredients like ketchup, mustard and a sesame seed bun. I quickly asked him if he wanted to go somewhere else and he anxiously nodded yes and we ate gluten free vegan Thai.

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Jul 19, 2017

This pretty much sums up the NYT's readership.

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Jul 19, 2017

Are zoning laws problematic and an example of people using political influence to prop up their own asset values? Yes. Would we be better off with more lax zoning laws? Yes. Are legacy admissions to college grossly unfair and unwarranted? Yes (there have been several studies to show that they do not drive any incremental donations). Are rich people "ruining" America? No.

Jul 19, 2017

Actually I would argue against changing zoning laws. They exist to stabilize regions. Can it work with more lax rules? Sure it could, but you would see an insane amount of turn over in neighborhoods being gentrified and then falling into disrepair and the cycle repeating. Neighborhood segregation as a systematic symptom of government enforced rules is almost entirely a thing of the past. It does exist in very very rare cases and should be stamped out when found, however the overwhelming majority of the segregation that goes on now is completely voluntary and is done so because culturally it is easier to exist that way.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Jul 19, 2017
heister:

Actually I would argue against changing zoning laws. They exist to stabilize regions. Can it work with more lax rules? Sure it could, but you would see an insane amount of turn over in neighborhoods being gentrified and then falling into disrepair and the cycle repeating. Neighborhood segregation as a systematic symptom of government enforced rules is almost entirely a thing of the past. It does exist in very very rare cases and should be stamped out when found, however the overwhelming majority of the segregation that goes on now is completely voluntary and is done so because culturally it is easier to exist that way.

Eh, there's a strong argument to make for changing from traditional zoning to form based code, but the problem isn't as much segregation as it is anti-density policies and zoning codes.

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Jul 19, 2017

Zoning laws are irrelevant, they aren't keeping people from being able to better themselves. They might keep someone who wants to live across from Central Park from being able to afford a place there. However that is not preventing them from living in NYC or even a couple blocks over from the park. This idiotic idea that changing zoning laws will suddenly fix everything is stupid. You don't just build real estate because you simply can you do it because it makes economic sense to do so. Houston is the closest example we have to completely unzoned major city in America, guess what? It still pretty much looks like it was zoned, sure there might me a couple high rise office buildings (10ish floors) in a neighborhood but they aren't just everywhere.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Jul 19, 2017

NY Times...

https://media2.giphy.com/media/3o6Zt80MXsxUwVcQiA/200_s.gif

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Jul 19, 2017

underrated comment!

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Jul 19, 2017

The impact of globalization and immigration has completely blown up the idea of nobleese largesse in America, and this has been perpetuated by the elites. Go back 50 years and it wouldn't have been crazy to have a doctor, banker or executive living in the same neighborhood as a teacher, union worker, or cop/fireman. Their kids would go to the same schools, they'd go to each others' houses for BBQs and more often than not they'd vacation in similar areas. Those days are long gone, and it has become this way due to the dog-eat-dog competitive mentality that has pervaded society in the advent of winner-take-all globalization.

For the sake of "efficiency gains" and cheap labor look at how many business owners and large corporations have cut staff, moved jobs overseas and simply reaped the benefits of this new order without providing trickle down effects to "lessers". Blue collar, lower and middle class people were never looking to become "rich" in the first place, but they certainly expected to have the opportunity for a decent wage that affords a modest home, a modest car and a modest family. The rich lost sight of this fact and basically said "I got mine! Fuck them!". The rich then moved to over-priced secluded areas, put their kids in private schools and looked down on those backwards people who haven't quite made it to the same level. I still see it all the time coming from a lower working class background to now being in "elite" circles. People on WSO are too young to know any better, but it wasn't always this way, just ask your grandparents. There was a time in America when the "elites" truly cared about the common man and looked to provide opportunities for them, not handouts. Today, more often than not, elites want to provide handouts in order to assuage the discomfort they feel from their cognitive dissonance.

The elites are the same ones who talk out of both sides of their mouths, saying "Oh yea, we totally need more opportunities and jobs in this country!" while at the same time they propose to their company's board to move manufacturing and call centers to Cambodia, since it will save 15% on the P&L and they can now better compete with slave-equivalent labor from China. It's ridiculous. Like why the fuck did American businesses even go to places like India, Mexico and China in the first place, especially when the latter has no problem stealing IP and technology, considering we were ALREADY the world leader in business, education and technology? Oh yea, it was for short-sighted gains even though their own countrymen and women would end up getting the axe down the line.

Look, I'm certainly a capitalist, but there has got to be some type of moral compass in society that helps to connect the different classes. People should be able to make money, become wealthy and reap the benefits of their intelligence, but too often these same people disconnect from normal society. All that has been accomplished in the last couple of generations is further stratification between the haves and have-nots, and this is not going to end well IMO.

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Jul 19, 2017

While I want to agree with you I can't, at least not based on your current reasoning. If you live anywhere outside of the east coast/ California and a few other high COL cities it is very easy to see a family of two teachers live in the same neighborhood as a family of two doctors. Additionally, private school is no where near as prevalent outside of the east coast. I think perhaps you may be from that area so your perspective is skewed.

p.s. I don't really think there was a time when "elites" cared about the common man beyond making a profit off of him, that is very idealistic "back in those days" thinking

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Jul 19, 2017

Possibly, and I see your point, but you have to remember that the elites on the coasts completely 100% drive the policy and direction of this country, and this is their experience exactly. If you were in LA, SF, NYC, DC, etc. and made a joke about those "backwards" people living in flyover states no one would even think twice about it, and everyone would likely laugh.

Even take for example some super smart kid who grows up in some flyover state like Iowa or Oklahoma. 50 years ago it wouldn't have seemed "stupid" for that kid to go to their flagship state university on a full-ride, maybe end up with a professional degree or PhD, and end up back in the general area of where they grew up, contributing to their community. Today that same kid is a completely stressed out goon worrying about whether their 2310 SAT, 9 APs and laundry list of extracurrics will get them into an Ivy. Then when that same kid leaves for college and ends up getting a professional degree he/she would never dream of living back where they grew up, and they likely disdain their upbringing since being introduced to so much LOL "culture".

Now there are many reasons that this scenario has played out, but IMO a big one is the competitive landscape that the elites have sowed in America, all in order to squeeze a few extra dollars out of the system. Just look at the picture below, from Harvard Business Review, showing the disproportionate gains; its sickening and wasn't always like this. These actions have consequences, hence where we are today as completely divided society.

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Jul 19, 2017

I don't think coastal elites drive policy, America as a whole is obsessed with capitalism and that is what drives our policy. To be fair, the Asian middle class came from nothing, they had the most to gain (percentage wise). Given the reality that the American middle class started richer and remains richer, it makes sense that the Asian middle class gained the most from globalization. China was in complete poverty before joining the WTO, their per capita GDP is still piss poor compared to America but on a chart like that their middle class would display huge gains.

Jul 19, 2017

Point taken with Asia, but you can completely disregard the left 2/3rds of the chart, as I am only concerned about American gains. That discrepancy is absurd when comparing intra-American gains, but the chart does make clear that Asian gains were at the detriment of the American lower and middles classes. The American elites perpetuated this all for their own gains, shipping lower and middle class jobs overseas all for a few extra bucks.

PS, you're extremely naive or young if you don't think coastal elites drive policy. All you have to do is look up the pedigree of Supreme Court Justices, Presidents, Congressmen and women, and lobbyists. I think you'll see a pattern emerge, containing about 25 undergrad universities, and 10 or so professional universities, mostly on the coasts.

Jul 19, 2017

Have to refute this.

I'm from Kansas City, which could be argued is a city where you have a flatter curve of class separation, but go look up these neighborhoods

Mission Hills
Fairway
Prairie Village
Ward Parkway
Plaza
Leawood

All of these are condensed affluent neighborhoods where price/sq ft. is rising rapidly and shutting out many people. I really think that the class separation is a problem at all levels of metro areas. Even in the monstrous incorporation like Overland Park or Blue Valley, there's separation in there between housing developments.

Take another example, I in a mid-sized Midwestern city, that has equal number private and public schools in the whole metro area. Go into the City limits, private schools heavily outweighs public. It's part school system, but a lot class system based.

Jul 19, 2017

This post reminds me of the opening scene in the Newsroom. Kudos

Jul 19, 2017

The ridiculousness of this article is right up there with an article I read awhile back about how parents who read to their children are giving their children an unfair advantage in life because there are parents out there that don't read to their children. It is really all about values. Upper-class parents are more likely to instill the values needed to stay upper-class than lower-class parents are. Obviously, there are some lower-class parents that teach their children the importance of education to get ahead and those children are the ones that do go up in classes.

He implies that parents shouldn't try to set their kids up for success as adults which is never going to happen. I've always been told that life isn't fair so I'm not sure why all of a sudden it is becoming a huge deal when people realize that old saying is actually true.

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Jul 19, 2017

It's absolutely not "all about values". It's partly about values. "Values" don't grant the kids of UMC parents legacy preference in college admissions. "Values" don't drive up real estate prices through exclusionary zoning laws and make housing in areas with good schools far less affordable. "Values" don't pay for Johnny's French lessons, piano lessons, unpaid internships and trips to Europe. Is there an easy solve for these disparities? For zoning and legacy admissions, yes. For the French lessons, etc, no, but let's not pin this all on values when wealth drives a very large part of it.

Jul 19, 2017

Values don't but reality does. Rich people care far more about setting their kids up, so they will seek out the areas and things that provide these to their children. When rich people congregate money follows, thus driving up the COL for the area. This isn't a system that is pushed by rich people like a bulldozer, it is more akin to a pulling effect where the rich people pull the reality to them. It creates the same thing, but originates from a completely different point and therefore makes a completely different viewpoint of how this should be addressed. In this case not at all.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Jul 19, 2017

Hmmm, so if I make $50k a year and want to buy a house in Chappaqua for the public schools, that's available to me? What if my "values" are all about education and setting my kids up? Do I get a waiver on the home price? And exclusionary zoning is exactly "pushed like a bulldozer" in order to keep property values high.

Jul 19, 2017

No you can't, and as with everything else I have said in this thread you completely missed the point. You are focusing on a problem that isn't caused by a systemic block. It is caused by the realities of the situation.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Jul 19, 2017

Another "who is ruining America thread. OP FUCK YOU.

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Jul 19, 2017

Geez you people get so triggered. Google "jingoism". America is not automatically the best at everything or perfect.

Jul 19, 2017

I did not suggest America is the best at everything. I simply do not care. America is clearly not the best at everything. America does however, give me the ability to wake up every morning and have the freedom to compete and carve out the future as I see fit. Sometimes things are out of my control...and that shit... I don't worry about. Set the goal, execute, win or lose, back to the drawing board. People that constantly try to figure out what is ruining America are just whiny bitches. They ride in the passenger seat and get angry they don't end up at the right destination. Fuck that, take the wheel. So as I said, OP FUCK YOU. Also CoreyTrevor...or whereever you are, FUCK YOU TOO.

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Jul 19, 2017

rich vs poor comes down to resourcefulness. It's never resources, if you have a great idea you can find a way to get it funded.
Perfect example, your local library. It's free to get a library card and in that library I'm guessing there are few books if you read them they would drastically change your life for the better. It's a gold mine of knowledge that if you apply it will reap rewards.

Jul 19, 2017

Right! VCs generally are just as willing to meet with black kids who went to BMCC as they are with white kids who went to Harvard. It's always just about the idea, nothing else matters!

Your post is so naive it's almost comical. The thought that growing up as Lloyd Blankfein's son would make no difference in whether you become rich or poor is a) absurd and b) contradicted by so much data it would take weeks to read it all (for a good starter read Raj Chetty's work on income and wealth stickiness).

Jul 19, 2017

Yes, because the entire world revolves around VCs for fucks sake pull your head out of your ass.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

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Jul 19, 2017

@heister To be fair, he sounds like he's watched some Shark Tank. I'd watch out

Jul 19, 2017

Use VCs as proxy for "financier X". And potential funders outside of VCs (angel investors, your rich uncle, etc) are even more network-dependent than VCs. VCs at least are formalized and are looking for ideas - rich uncles are something that mostly are available only to rich people and those who know rich people. If the next thing you're going to pitch is funding from a local bank, go see how much money the local credit officer at Chase has lent to non-traditional startups.

Jul 19, 2017

You act as if the only businesses that ever get started at tech companies.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

May 4, 2018

fuck you

Jul 19, 2017

Much witty a reply.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

May 4, 2018

You're a clever boy, aren't you?

Jul 19, 2017

Ask around.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Jul 19, 2017

the only aspect of OP's post I agree with is the proximity/awareness factor. I live in a middle class town and spent my entire childhood thinking that the only way to get rich was to be a celebrity/ inventor of something brilliant because I never saw "real wealth" up close-- it seemed so distant and chimeric. Then, I got to prep school and saw the true power of education/privilege. All of my peers were absurdly rich yet when I met their parents they seemed like completely normal people, the only difference being their educational backgrounds. I just couldnt wrap my mind around how wealthy they were. I thought that magnitude was reserved for famous people.

Fast forward to junior year of college, and I am worlds ahead of the kids I grew up with. And I will attribute none of my success to personal talent or brilliance-- Im confident that all of these kids that grew up in public schooling are equally as capable as me of getting a high finance job. They dont know any better, though. They dont see the doors that open with good grades and putting effort into networking. They just coast through school with a smile on their face completely oblivious to the other side of the world. If they knew what I knew about getting the best possible grades, exerting effort in the proper ECs, and whatnot, they would be wildly successful. But they dont know better. And the only reason there is a barrier between them and me is because I was exposed to something they were not.

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