Banking vs. Consulting -- Post-MBA

sparked's picture
Rank: Monkey | 31

I see a lot of threads comparing banking and consulting at the undergrad level, however I haven't seen too many of them comparing these two at the post-MBA level, so I wanted to start one.

I will be starting at a top 10 MBA program this Fall. My work experience has been in corporate finance and general management thus far. My long-term goal is to either be in private equity, or to be a general manager/CEO leading dynamic, high-growth companies backed by PE/VC money (preferably at a stage post-launch, but pre-IPO).

5-8 years post-MBA, I have ZERO interest in being in a client serving role -- I want to be either running/helping manage companies or investing in them. However, I am definitely open to being in a client serving role for the learning experience, and I want to learn as much as I can about high-level business and value creation, as soon as I can.

Career options: investment banking vs consulting post mba

If you are unclear on what you want to end up in the next 5 to 10 years after exiting then consulting. Consulting offers a broader set of skills that are applicable outside of finance. It's easier to market your skills to product management, corporate development, operation type roles. But getting into the buy side is more difficult than it would be if you were coming from banking

If you want to stay in finance or more specifically, end up on the buy side investment banking might be better. You have skills that are directly applicable to the buy side. But those skills grow more specific as you advance in your career so exiting into the corporate world can be more difficult ( when compared to consulting).

Key Takeaways

  • Investment banking can set you up for a career in finance and the buy side but at it's harder to exit to various corporate roles.
  • Consultants gain a broader skill set that makes it easier to exit to various corporate roles but breaking into the buy side becomes more difficult.

from certified user @MBAApply

If you're unsure about what you want to do in the medium- to long-term, go the consulting route.

The reason is if you go into banking, it's harder to get out of it if you decide to move outside of finance. You WILL be pigeonholed, especially if you stay beyond the associate level. But if your interests lie more in finance, investing, fundraising, etc. then focus on banking.

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Comments (58)

Apr 13, 2010

based on your career goals
go consulting

Apr 13, 2010
sparked:

private equity

general manager/CEO leading dynamic, high-growth companies

running/helping manage companies or investing in them
learn as much as I can about high-level business and value creation, as soon as I can

besides the PE part...consulting

however it really depends...if you get no name consulting and goldman ibd

or if you get BCG and small investment bank

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Apr 13, 2010

I wouldn't say that people in consulting value work/life balance, at least not the people you'll be working for. The hours aren't as bad as in banking, but people in consulting complain just as much about the lifestyle. The difference is that with banking, everybody knows what they're getting into. In consulting, b-school students are led to believe that work/life balance exists.

Apr 13, 2010
indenturedprimate:

I wouldn't say that people in consulting value work/life balance, at least not the people you'll be working for. The hours aren't as bad as in banking, but people in consulting complain just as much about the lifestyle. The difference is that with banking, everybody knows what they're getting into. In consulting, b-school students are led to believe that work/life balance exists.

As far as I'm aware, most consultants post-MBA work approximately a 60-70 hour week compared to the 80-100 range for banking associates. Is this incorrect?

I realize that travel is a downer, but it seems like its mostly Monday-Thursday at most places, with Fridays being a bit more laid back at home, and weekends off for the most part.

Moreover, and I could be totally wrong on this, but I've never heard of consultants working on New Years Eve, Christmas or the day their wife is giving birth. I've heard all 3 stories about bankers.

Aug 11, 2013

Sparked - Curious what you ended up doing and how you feel about the decision?

I'm an MBA1 and thinking through the same career options. Would really appreciate your thoughts.

Apr 13, 2010

What if you took my specific long-term goals out of the picture (as they could very well change).

Could you compare/contrast banking and consulting in general, irregardless of LT goals?

Apr 14, 2010

I'd say it's more like 60-80 in consulting vs. 70-90 in banking (for associates). People often over-estimate the number of hours they work because they don't do the math on how many hours they actually work and because the stories people here are always of the bad weeks, and not the normal weeks.

You're right about consultants working on holidays being much less common than it is in banking. It happens, but while consulting work isn't very predictable, it's predictable enough to try and plan around that sort of thing. Deals are much more of a time sensitive thing than consulting projects are.

On the other hand, any banker that's missing the birth of their child because they're stuck at the office is a jackass.

Apr 14, 2010

Is it really 70 to 90 for associates in IB? I read somewhere that first year IB associates regularly clock 9-12 workdays. Is this true? or just a rumor. As far as promotions go (in a utopian scenario - ceteris paribus) what time frame does it take for consultants (post-mba) to advance to EM/principal and for associates to advance to VP/ED? What is the difference in pay? Sorry if i'm asking a lot :$

-

Jan 23, 2012

Can't speak for IB, but the consulting career path post MBA is like this (at least for MBB)

2 years: associate (McK)/consultant (BCG/Bain) - $20K signing, $125-$150K salary, $15K-$30K performance bonus
2 years: engagement manager (McK)/project leader (BCG)/case team leader (Bain), $150-$180K salary, $30-60K bonus
2-3 years: senior engagement manager (McK)/principal (BCG)/manager (Bain) all in you're pushing $300K if you are a high performer
Less clear at upper levels, and compensation starts to diverge significantly at the partner level (McK pays most, Bain pays least). Young partners make between $500K and $1M, more senior partners can make multiple millions, and I believe that those who are the best sales reps and/or advance within the partner org to lead offices and regions can potentially crack eight figures. But then we're talking 15 years in for a top performer, so if you're in it for the money, banking is the way to go.

Tier 2 and 3 consulting firms start out with similar comp but generally take longer to advance and tend to be significantly less competitive at higher levels.

TMI?

Aug 11, 2013

AC - I'm entering MBA as a management consulting manager (think Deloitte / PwC / Accenture). Would I necessarily be brought into M/B/B as an associate / consultant or would I get some advancement due to my previous experience? Also, how much of an advantage would I have over others due to my prev experience? MBB hire ~50 kids / year at my school, so it's no guarantee that I'd get one of the three

Aug 11, 2013

You may get some consideration at MBB, but you're extremely unlikely to be brought on at the EM/PL level right out of school. They will heavily discount the consulting experience from what they would consider to be a Tier 2 or 3 firm (depending on which of those you were). You'll find yourself facing stiff competition for promotion against the kids who started in the firm right out of undergrad and already have 2-3 years under their belt -- and these kids are ridiculously smart. OTOH, you'll be at an advantage versus the MBA hires who only have F500 experience, because you'll understand the pattern and pace of casework -- the quick ramp, the 80/20 hypothesis-driven push for quick insights, the multiple iterations with the partner on messaging and presentation, and the ad-hoc follow-ups. Lots of ex-Accenture/Deloitte types that make it into MBB after grad school end up doing pretty well. But don't think that your two years there prepared you for life at MBB ... you'll be constantly on your toes. Good luck!

Jan 23, 2012

And all in for first year IBD post MBA associates was 200 to 220 vs 180 190 for consulting and 140ish for corp fin rotations correct?

Jan 23, 2012

And all in for first year IBD post MBA associates was 200 to 220 vs 180 190 for consulting and 140ish for corp fin rotations correct?

Jan 24, 2012
shorttheworld:

And all in for first year IBD post MBA associates was 200 to 220 vs 180 190 for consulting and 140ish for corp fin rotations correct?

assuming 100% bonus (not really the case anymore), first year BB IBD MBA associate should be about 300k i think. $130k base, $130k bonus, $50k sign-on

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Jan 24, 2012

So really, as a 2nd year post-MBA consultant, you're probably making $145-160k all-in. The first year figures are inflated due to the sign-on and relocation bonuses.

Why is consulting somehow seen as better compensation than F500 jobs? On an hourly basis, it's probably worse.

Jan 24, 2012

Although I don't find MBB consulting work that interesting (or consulting in general), I think it gives you the widest breadth of exit options and a fungible business skill set. Depending on what type of work you do, you can do anything from corporate strategy to startups to private equity and even hedge funds. Actually, a lot of long-short equity hedge funds are beginning to hire more ex-consultants due to their expertise in specific industries.

Jan 26, 2012

People choose consulting over banking for many reasons:
- More collegial environment stressing cooperation and teamwork
- More variety of work and problem solving
- More flexible exit options (you can go from consulting to just about anywhere, IB will exit into finance)
- Promises of work-life balance (not really true if you want to advance, though)
- More job stability
- More humane environment ... you're not likely to get cussed out in consulting unless you really blow it

People choose consulting over F500 because:
- Each year worked in consulting advances you 2-3 years to where you will land when you finally jump to industry
- 1st 2 years in consulting you'll make a little more than industry, at 3-4 you'll make a lot more, and at 5+ you'll make a ton more
- Prestige ... having MBB on your resume gives you instant credibility in the corporate world in just about any environment, any company

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Jan 26, 2012
ac22766:

People choose consulting over banking for many reasons:
- More collegial environment stressing cooperation and teamwork
- More variety of work and problem solving
- More flexible exit options (you can go from consulting to just about anywhere, IB will exit into finance)
- Promises of work-life balance (not really true if you want to advance, though)
- More job stability
- More humane environment ... you're not likely to get cussed out in consulting unless you really blow it

People choose consulting over F500 because:
- Each year worked in consulting advances you 2-3 years to where you will land when you finally jump to industry
- 1st 2 years in consulting you'll make a little more than industry, at 3-4 you'll make a lot more, and at 5+ you'll make a ton more
- Prestige ... having MBB on your resume gives you instant credibility in the corporate world in just about any environment, any company

PMd you

Jan 26, 2012

.

Jan 28, 2012

which MBA programs in the 8-16 range place the best in MBB? i heard Yale and Ross do pretty well. what about UVA and Cornell?

Jan 28, 2012

cornell gets some bain and mckinsey. duke does VERY well for consulting -- maybe even better than ross nowadays since theyre a mckinsey target. i think duke and ross are prolly thw two dominant ones -- not so sure about yale because i havent been able to find any concrete hiring #s for them

Jan 29, 2012

Depends what you consider the 8th. For me, 7-9 is Tuck, Columbia and Haas, so whichever two of those isn't 7th, and then Ross.

Best Response
Jan 29, 2012

Sounds like your long-term goals would be best achieved by doing consulting post-MBA (assuming you get M/B/B).

It will be very challenging for you to move directly into private equity investing (i.e., being on the deal team). Nearly 100% of MBA students who get hired into PE firms as Vice Presidents already have PE experience before business school. Of those who don't, they almost certainly have bulge-bracket IB experience, or some other well-regarded finance experience. There is no reason for a PE firm to take a risk on a person with no investing experience when there is ample supply of candidates who have already done PE.

Even if you choose to become an associate at an i-bank, it will be very difficult to move into PE. There is no logical level for you to transition into at the PE firm. You're too old to be an associate, and not experienced enough to be a Vice President.

Therefore, the only way you're likely to get into PE investing is to become a successful senior executive and move into PE much later in your career.

That leaves your second career goal: being a "senior executive for hire." My PE firm (large fund in the U.S.) uses guys like this a lot for our portfolio companies. It's actually a pretty good gig. You can come into a new investment and have huge impact for several years, then move onto another company. Or, if you decide you really like being at a certain company, you can just stay there, even after the PE fund exits. There is often a lot of equity upside for guys like this.

The best way to get to this point out of an MBA is to do consulting, which opens you up to a variety of potentially relevant options after 2-3 years at the consulting firm. One option would be to go directly into management at a PE-backed company (perhaps in biz dev, strategy or similar). Another would be to join the portfolio consulting group at a large PE fund (e.g., KKR Capstone, Bain Cap Portfolio Group, etc.). After you do that, you could transition into a more permanent role at a portfolio company.

Anyway, once you build a rep as a good manager, i-bankers will help connect you to PE firms that are making investments in your industry of expertise. We "interview" guys like this frequently when we're considering new investments.

If I were you, I'd only do banking if you think there is a realistic chance that you'll want to be a senior banker. Otherwise, it isn't worth the two years of pain for such limited exit options.

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Feb 7, 2012

Same general question but I'm looking at M/B;D or MM IB all in South Florida (assuming I don't hit the lottery and get a PE job down here). Goal is to stay in South Florida. I don't care about traveling during the week (I say this now), I figure working 16 hr days is about the same as traveling 5 days a week. With that logic, I prefer the paycheck. Clearly, the M/B and even D looks better than a regional MM IB but could you not earn more at the regional bank (e.g Farlie Turner, etc.)?

I'm old too (31) so I need to pick the career that I'm going to stay in. Geographic stability is as important as the paycheck and promotion potential.

Thanks.

Feb 8, 2012

To echo what others here have already said, it's really quite simple.

If you're unsure about what you want to do in the medium- to long-term, go the consulting route.

The reason is if you go into banking, it's harder to get out of it if you decide to move outside of finance. You WILL be pigeonholed, especially if you stay beyond the associate level. But if your interests lie more in finance, investing, fundraising, etc. then focus on banking.

Consulting gives you a broader skill set and knowledge that you can make it easier to transition to a wider set of opportunities outside of finance compared to banking, especially if you're looking outside of finance (i.e. product management, operations, marketing, general management, corporate development, etc.). The flipside is that it's much harder to get into the buyside (or just back into finance) if you've been in consulting already for a few years post-MBA.

The lifestyle sucks in the first few years post-MBA regardless of which path you take. In consulting you're traveling all the time, and in banking you're in the office all the time - either way, your personal life becomes a very low priority. It can get better after 3-5 years, or if it doesn't, most people end up leaving anyhow for a better work-life balance.

Aug 11, 2013

If you are more intellectual/thinker and want to work on the investing or company side then go do asset management, you won't be suitable to a CEO role if your not a sales guy, so consulting is completely out of the window.

Sep 23, 2013

Consulting seems to be a better fit

Sep 23, 2013

Consultants work just as hard, travel more and get paid less. Any questions?

Sep 23, 2013
jhoratio:

Consultants work just as hard, travel more and get paid less. Any questions?

I am in consulting. I agree with your statement.

Sep 23, 2013
jhoratio:

Consultants work just as hard, travel more and get paid less. Any questions?

completely agree with this statement

however it really depends what you want to do long term

and believe it or not, at my MBB many people could have gone to banking if they wanted

the skillsets are different and exit opportunities are different

however if you want to make money, do banking

Sep 23, 2013

on the plus side, consultants collect a lot of frequent flyer miles, hotel points and basically dont really spend any money, but u are the road quite a bit.

some firms allow you to work 4 days a week and then have friday, sat, sunday off. not sure if MBB does that.

I'm making it up as I go along.

Sep 23, 2013

I'm in the same situation as maxim460.
From my research, it seems that the post-MBA work hours & pay breakdowns are as follows:

consulting
120-135k base
25-40k bonus
10k relocation
75-90 hours (mainly between M and F, with manageable preparation for the next week taking place at home for maybe 5 hours max during the weekend)

banking
95-105k base
95-105k bonus
0-10k relocation
90-115 hours (depending on your group, you might get down to 75 hours on the off-cycle, but you will be on-call and frequently in the office on weekends)

am i missing anything?

Sep 23, 2013
Javi2:

I'm in the same situation as maxim460.
From my research, it seems that the post-MBA work hours & pay breakdowns are as follows:

consulting
120-135k base
25-40k bonus
10k relocation
75-90 hours (mainly between M and F, with manageable preparation for the next week taking place at home for maybe 5 hours max during the weekend)

banking
95-105k base
95-105k bonus
0-10k relocation
90-115 hours (depending on your group, you might get down to 75 hours on the off-cycle, but you will be on-call and frequently in the office on weekends)

am i missing anything?

Regarding the banking associate, the hours quoted here seem exceptionally steep. My associates have an average arrival time of 9am and an average leave time of ~10pm. This is fairly standard across my bank (bulge bracket); however, there are obvious exceptions. There is, in my opinion, a clear disconnect on here between "peak" hours and "average" hours. Yes, associates will work up to 120 hours per week when a deal is about to launch or close, but that would only be for a banner deal, and there is no way in hell they average 90-115.

Personally, I would much rather work my ass off and at least come home to my own bed with my wife every night, even if it is late and she's already asleep, than go to a hotel 4 nights a week, 45 weeks a year.

Sep 23, 2013

my friends who went consulting now wish they had done banking (we have been out of b-school a couple of years now)

Sep 23, 2013

i think banking associates would make 120 base with 120 bonus.

Sep 23, 2013

McK --> again, depends on whether they're on a foreign engagement or local. If you're out in Africa for a 6 month engagement, you'll come home every 3rd/4th week.

Banking --> really is group by group. The culture of the group (and primarily the VPs) determine how much work they want to give you. Clearly, if you're on a deal, expect to work that weekend. My first year and a half, I was in every other weekend for a few hours here and there. Now, one in every three since I've got younger associates who can help out.

I came from a MBB background (pre-MBA) and am now in banking. While the jobs are fundamentally the same in that you're in salesy role and at your clients' behest, I appreciate being able to go home to my wife every night. This would have been very difficult to manage in consulting.

Sep 23, 2013
bankbanker101:

McK --> again, depends on whether they're on a foreign engagement or local. If you're out in Africa for a 6 month engagement, you'll come home every 3rd/4th week.

Banking --> really is group by group. The culture of the group (and primarily the VPs) determine how much work they want to give you. Clearly, if you're on a deal, expect to work that weekend. My first year and a half, I was in every other weekend for a few hours here and there. Now, one in every three since I've got younger associates who can help out.

I came from a MBB background (pre-MBA) and am now in banking. While the jobs are fundamentally the same in that you're in salesy role and at your clients' behest, I appreciate being able to go home to my wife every night. This would have been very difficult to manage in consulting.

Thanks for clearing up the lifestyle differences in IB vs MBB. Could you please talk about why you decided to choose IB post MBA instead of going back to consulting?

Also, are there a lot of exit ops into F500- corp dev, or corp strategy after spending 2~3 years in IB post MBA? If so, what level (sr. mgr, director?) or pay would they expect?

Sep 23, 2013

Consulting: you're hired for one of two reasons

1. Either to provide a rubber stamp of approval on something your client already came up with so they can pass the idea further up the chain

2. justify something that a division may not be comfortable going through with. I.e., "our McK study showed that while we kill X number of fish through the installation of hydro pumps, they recommend that we proceed because it results in Y savings"

Let's face it: the clients that hire MBB are large corporations (for the most part). They've got their own consulting and strategy groups that know their space, clients and products much better than an external party. I got tired of this so left and did corp dev at a company before bschool.

Exits: biz dev, operations, strategy

Banking: I thought was more down my path because it's transaction-based.

Yes, the work can be mind-numbing and the thought of putting together another pitch book may make you want to tear your hair out, but a. you're learning (even while pitching) and b. you should understand that those pitches are a way for the MD to feel out the client and see, based on their rejection/acceptance of certain proposals, potential movements in the market. While it's tough to pick this up as an analyst/associate, oftentimes,the VPs can give insight into this strategy.

Since banking is more transaction-oriented, oftentimes ex-bankers (associate/jr VPs) leave to do business development. They'll know how a sales process works, how negotiations are made, and how to sell.

Associates can leave to go to PE. I've seen it happen. LevFin guys go to HF's or PE since they know the high yield market well; M&A/coverage guys can go to PE if they have prior experience or just hustle.

Hope that helps

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Sep 23, 2013

Great responses on this thread. Very helpful. I am also curious to understand the exit opps in Biz development , corp. strategy 3 years post BB investment banking. At what level do these bankers join after 3 years as an associate? Thanks.

Sep 23, 2013

Could we revisit this age old question? It would be great to get the view of a current business school student. The reason I think it deserves a revisit is because of the following positive and negative changes for each industry:

Investment Banking
Positive Change: Focus on better lifestyle due to competition from Tech and Consulting; rebound in compensation
Negative Change: Increase in regulation could affect the health of the industry in the long term

Consulting
Positive Change: Increase in compensation
Negative Change: Move by all firms towards execution and less strategy; too much competition by applicants gives you a worse chance at MBB

Also, could someone discuss the differences/similarities in exit ops? From what I gathered I have seen discussion of the following:

Investment Banking: Corp Dev (common), Corp Strat (common), Hedge Fund (frequent), PE (somewhat rare)
Consulting: Corp Strat (common), Corp Dev (rare), PE (very rare),

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Sep 23, 2013
thecm:

Could we revisit this age old question? It would be great to get the view of a current business school student. The reason I think it deserves a revisit is because of the following positive and negative changes for each industry:

Investment Banking

Positive Change: Focus on better lifestyle due to competition from Tech and Consulting; rebound in compensation

Negative Change: Increase in regulation could affect the health of the industry in the long term

Consulting

Positive Change: Increase in compensation

Negative Change: Move by all firms towards execution and less strategy; too much competition by applicants gives you a worse chance at MBB

Also, could someone discuss the differences/similarities in exit ops? From what I gathered I have seen discussion of the following:

Investment Banking: Corp Dev (common), Corp Strat (common), Hedge Fund (frequent), PE (somewhat rare)

Consulting: Corp Strat (common), Corp Dev (rare), PE (very rare),

Summarized really well. I too would be interested in seeing what the current students or recent grads have to say about Banking vs Consulting.

Sep 23, 2013

As a first year Associate, you will work just as much as first year analyst, if not more. People will not take you as seriously because you don't know shit.

Life will get better for Associates after their first year. Yes it is possible to come in at 9 and leave at 10 during down times, but you probably won't find any downtime as a first year. Again, this is all dependent on group.

Sep 23, 2013

You're working more than a first-year Analyst? What bank is this at?

Sep 23, 2013

Neither should be considered a long term career. Both serve purposes. I'd go IB and figure out the rest later.

Sep 23, 2013

both careers suck for married people looking to spend time with wife / kid.

Many married upper level consultants i know have outside relatinships at their client cities. This is a sad reality.

Travel for consulting is pretty standard Mon - Thur on the road with Friday in the office or at home.

I don't know about MBB comp straight out of bschool - but i know what some of the others. are you that certain you'll make it into MBB?

Sep 23, 2013

No point in picking consulting post mba if quality of life is important. Consulting generally gets much worse the more senior you get - you're married to the firm when principal. May make sense to do MBB to get the CV stamp but see for yourself whether it's worth the sacrifice.

Also before you invest in your MBA effort really check whether you're likely to get interviews.

Sep 23, 2013

No point in picking consulting post mba if quality of life is important. Consulting generally gets much worse the more senior you get - you're married to the firm when principal. May make sense to do MBB to get the CV stamp but see for yourself whether it's worth the sacrifice.

Completely agree, and this is something that people don't realize until they get into consulting... in fact, a lot of junior consultants remain oblivious to this. In my opinion, managers have the worst lives in consulting. They're expected to work across multiple projects and play a role in winning new business. This means that they travel significantly but with very little control over their schedule and don't get close enough to a case to really understand what's going on at a detailed level. Partners have pretty crappy lifestyles as well, as they're often in 3 or 4 different cities a week, and reviewing and commenting on decks late at night and/or while on their 6:30am flights.

Also before you invest in your MBA effort really check whether you're likely to get interviews.

If you're going to one of the top 8 schools, landing interviews in consulting or banking will be relatively easy as long as you're not a complete retard during the recruiting process. The big consulting firms will basically interview anybody with a pulse that's interested (at least for full-time, internships are harder to get in consulting).

In banking, there are numerous firms with significant closed list slots, and if you know how to network and play the game during recruiting you should land interviews with a significant share of those firms. For banking, this process is focused on the first year students recruiting for summer internships. Most people accept full-time offers with the firms they intern with, and the full-time recruiting process is much smaller and tougher than internship recruiting.

Sep 23, 2013

Base salaries first year out of business schools in consulting are generally $125k or $130k. Bonuses will likely range from 20-40k (some will get more and some less, but there's not a ton of variation in consulting bonuses).

Banking base salaries are $95k at some banks, but a few banks like Goldman have raised base salaries significantly, with a presumed commensurate reduction in bonuses, in response to the furor over bonuses over the past year. This move makes sense because banking bonuses have tradtionally been part deferred compensation (which even low performers expect) and part performance pay (including personal, group, and firm performance). Banking bonuses are highly variable, but as a rule of thumb for a first year associate in banking (and your first year begins in January a few months after you start) expect to make between 75k and 125k more than you would in consulting in your first year.

Your hours are going to suck in either field. You'll spend more time in the office in banking and work longer hours overall. In consulting, how much you travel will depend both on the firm you're with as well as the types of projects you get staffed on. When you're on the road, a typical day could be 8am to 8pm, dinner with the team, and then a few hours of work from your hotel. Sometimes you'll work late nights at the client site or be relegated to finding a Kinkos to work from if you have to leave the client site but need to continue. On Friday, you'll usually have to go into the office and will probably work from 8:30 or 9am to around 6pm. If you're working on a project where you're working out of your own office (private equity due diligence and growth strategy cases may involve this) then your hours will usually be a little worse than when you're on the road. However, sleeping in your own bed is worth that tradeoff.

There will be weekend work in each field. In banking, weekend work typically involves cranking out a model, a pitch pack, or a bank book ahead of a Monday or Tuesday morning meeting. In consulting, it's usually putting together materials, performing research, or workplanning for the week ahead. Consulting work over the weekend will be more mentally exhausting than banking work, and frankly, when I'm working over a weekend I'd rather do banking style work where you can turn your brain off and plug away for a while.

Sep 23, 2013
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