Berkeley Bans Natural Gas

CHCommodities's picture
Rank: Monkey | 60

Berkeley has officially become the first city in the United States to ban natural gas.. What does this mean for the future? Should those in the natural gas industry be concerned more than ever? Or is this just a case of Berkeley being Berkeley..

Comments (22)

Jul 29, 2019

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Jul 31, 2019
AMIsLife:

Cali is a fucked up state, and always will be until they get some people in the state government who actually know what they are doing. I don't think this is something to be concerned about in the long term, Cali is an extreme case. Like you said, its just Berkeley being Berkeley.

Nah bro, we're the only ones who've got our act together.

Y'all just be jealous of our amazing economy, forward thinking ability (natural gas is an inefficient fossil fuel), cosmopolitan society, and ability to re-invent and innovate.

But I get it - haters gonna hate.

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Jul 31, 2019

This is a joke, right? Because natural gas is the most efficient non-nuclear power source and tens of thousands of Californians are fleeing the state every year for a real economy in Texas.

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Jul 31, 2019

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Jul 31, 2019

I wouldn't call a state is in debt up to its ears, and oh, also is up to its ears in human filth, wants to secede, and has virtually no economy whatsoever "amazing."

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Funniest
Jul 29, 2019

Does Berkeley know most of their electricity comes from natural gas?

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Jul 31, 2019
Bizkitgto:

Does Berkeley know most of their electricity comes from natural gas?

Actually I'm not sure that's the case.
Do you have info you can share on the source of Berkeley's energy stack?

Jul 30, 2019

If this is true, what does it mean to "ban natural gas"? ie, no hookups for cooking? no gas for electricity generation? If they truly did "ban" natural gas, they might as well ban the automobile.

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Jul 30, 2019

exactly

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Jul 31, 2019

ban is on new installations, not affecting previous installs, and has certain carve-outs as well.

Berkeley has put in place a plan to get 100% of its energy from zero-carbon sources by 2045.

This ban is part of planning out the energy sources as part of that program.

Jul 31, 2019

Holy shit lotta mouth-breathers showing out

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Most Helpful
Jul 31, 2019

Berkeley ban article

Thought y'all might enjoy reading an article on why Berkeley put the ban in place.
It's actually not as crazy as you might think.

1) the ban is on new installations and has certain carve-outs

2) ban is part of Berkeley's plan to get energy from zero-carbon sources by 2045. It's important that when designing the energy grid and stack of the future that cleaner energy sources are selected up-front. That's just how intelligent planning works.

3) while Berkeley may be early in the trend, many other California cities are pondering exactly the same move - and such bans have already been implemented in other global locations

4) LNG also poses safety risks - esp in a state that has a lot of earthquakes. Simply put, there are safer, cleaner alternatives available, and a ban helps steer the energy selection

Some fun quotes:

  • A state energy commission report released in early 2019 concluded that building electrification was "a key strategy" for reducing the state's climate impacts, one that "offers the most promising path to achieving [greenhouse gas] reduction targets in the least costly manner".
  • "Governments across the US and Europe are looking at strategies to phase out gas. In California alone, dozens of cities and counties are considering eliminating fossil fuel hook-ups to power stoves and heat homes in new buildings"
  • A state energy commission report released in early 2019 concluded that building electrification was "a key strategy" for reducing the state's climate impacts, one that "offers the most promising path to achieving [greenhouse gas] reduction targets in the least costly manner".
  • "There's been a lingering perception that burning gas was cleaner than electricity, which might have been true 20 years ago when electricity came from burning coal," said Pierre Delforge, a senior scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council . "When we look at electrification policies, we need to think about what the grid will look like in 10 or 20 years, not what it looked like yesterday."
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Jul 31, 2019

yo can we please kills this thread its becoming a hotbed for arguments

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Jul 31, 2019
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