Best Casebooks?

jm442's picture
Rank: Monkey | 35

I'm currently preparing for first round interviews at a couple of firms. I've read all of the cases in CIP and the MBA casebooks I have. Does anyone have suggestions for other quality casebooks?

Also, is there any place where you can find old cases that have actually been given during past interviews at specific firms?

Comments (12)

Dec 31, 1969

You don't need anymore - if you've gone through the Wharton book, anything more is overkill. I used to conduct case interviews, and believe me there's only so many ways to ask a case.

Dec 31, 1969

http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~jgsmcc/1999-2000_Tuck_Gui...
Also do the practice cases on the firm web sites. If you've really made it through all that material though, you should be fairly prepared, I don't remember doing significantly more than Case in Point, the firm websites, and a couple glances at the Wharton and Tuck guides.

Dec 31, 1969

I did a ton more prep. Check out Victor Chen's site (consultinginterviews.com or something). Nail down your frameworks. Prep your resume question answers.

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2,037 questions across 209 consulting firms. 11 Cases developed by a McKinsey Associate, 10+ hours of video. The WSO Consulting Interview Prep Course has everything you’ll ever need to ace your consulting case interviews. Learn more.

Dec 31, 1969

Thanks guys. I am planning to do Case In Point and also the Tuck and Wharton guides. Any more consulting casebooks that are out there?

Dec 31, 1969

uhhhh, shameless self promote. We just released an awesome Consulting Case Interview guide.

10 original cases, frameworks and more.

consulting case interviews.

good luck,
Patrick

Dec 31, 1969

I counted at least 10 here http://tinyurl.com/33bzy8u
I also found the best preparation for the case interviews can be found at Victor Cheng's website (for free):
http://www.caseinterview.com/ It is way better than Case in Point - I used it and I received an MBB offer.

Dec 31, 1969

The most important thing for you to do is get feedback from someone who knows what they're talking about. You can do as much prep as you want, and if you're not doing it well, it's going to be worthless. Someone in the industry can tell you where you're weak and how to improve on it. Knowing how to solve a case in a book is great, but knowing how to drill down to that answer and how to present it to someone who knows what your interviewers will look for is more important.

Dec 31, 1969

Peter's point is a good one. Have you tried looking up consultants through your school alumni network? Even though you have long since graduated, I bet your career services department would be willing to help you out. Such alumni would probably be willing to do some practice case interviews with you.

Dec 31, 1969

Thanks all!

Dec 31, 1969
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