Best NYC Neighborhoods for Recent Graduates

I just graduated college and I'm going to be moving to NYC in the next month or so. Curious what you'd say are the best areas of the city for people in their early 20s to live? Factors I'd consider are price, nightlife, restaurants, etc.
Thanks

Comments (21)

 
Jul 28, 2020 - 8:04pm

East Village, West Village, Soho, LES

FiDi seems to have nice buildings with amenities at decent prices, but I like East Village the best.

Sometimes though, you have to search all neighborhoods for a a good deal, but definitely take the time to see a lot of them if you can to get an idea of the market. And act fast to close a deal in NYC - you need all of your money and shit ready to go to close quicker than someone else.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

 
Jul 28, 2020 - 11:00pm

Isaiah_53_5:

And act fast to close a deal in NYC - you need all of your money and shit ready to go to close quicker than someone else.

To gain an edge, what specifically are you referring to? Probably checks with if to close quick if in person, but what else that's maybe more NYC specific? Not references or any shit like that right?

Quant (ˈkwänt) n: An expert, someone who knows more and more about less and less until they know everything about nothing.

 
Jul 28, 2020 - 11:08pm

No I don't think you should need references - just the cashiers check

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

 
Most Helpful
Jul 28, 2020 - 8:37pm

In no particular order, here's where I've seen most analysts live (i.e. age 22-25).

  1. East Village / Lower East Side: very young neighborhoods, very affordable walk-ups with lots of nightlife. High concentration of college and post-college aged kids. Loud at night on weekends. Transportation isn't the most convenient with only a few subway lines nearby.

  2. Murray Hill: similar post-college and mid 20s working professionals population, one tier more expensive than EV/LES but definitely affordable on a finance salary with roommates. Lots of nightlife. Very popular with the finance crowd, easy commute to Midtown.

  3. Hells Kitchen: A much busier part of the city since it's close to Times Square (lots of tourist spillover), not a very homely feel unlike the villages. Some nice high rise buildings that can be affordable with roommates. Convenient if you work in Midtown.

  4. Soho / West Village: two of the nicest neighborhoods in Manhattan but unlikely to be affordable on a first year analyst salary unless you come from money.

  5. Upper East Side / Upper West Side: more residential, tends to have more families. Can find pretty affordable walkups farther uptown that aren't a bad commute to midtown. Close to Central Park which is nice. Not much nightlife.

  6. Financial District: some really nice affordable high rise buildings with amenities, but a pretty crappy neighborhood (aside from nearby Seaport district). Not much nightlife, pretty dead on weekends.

 
Jul 28, 2020 - 11:01pm

Great write up. Which of these would you recommend for someone in their later 20s/early 30s that wants to either live alone/1 bedroom in a relationship?

Quant (ˈkwänt) n: An expert, someone who knows more and more about less and less until they know everything about nothing.

 
Jul 29, 2020 - 5:49pm

It's highly dependent on what you can afford/how much you want to spend. It's also a really mixed bag at that age with some people moving out of the city to buy homes in the suburbs and start families. Of the the neighborhoods I listed in my original post above, I would say East Village/LES might feel a little young for you (lots of college kids), but the others still apply. There are some really nice neighborhoods on the west side of Manhattan (West Village / Chelsea / Tribeca / Battery Park City / Hudson Yards) that are all great options if you can afford them (they're expensive) and have more adult populations.

 
Jul 28, 2020 - 11:20pm

JAB123:

2. Murray Hill: Lots of nightlife.

lol oohhhh reallly

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

 
Jul 29, 2020 - 11:40am

Not a bad writeup. I'd push against downtown, since it's expensive and far from anything unless you work there and suggest way uptown on Broadway. The commute is a hike, but you get a lot more for your money

LIC/Astoria or billyburg can be nice but you're not really saving much money. Depending where you work you might not be saving commute time either.

Have you considered Jersey? Some dates will go "Ew, Jersey?" but you can get into downtown or the west side in under 30 minutes. Saving the ~3.5% NYC tax can also be bank.

I generally see somebody I know on TV on Bloomberg/CNBC etc. once or twice a week. This sounds cool, until I remind myself that I see somebody I know on ESPN five days a week.
  • 1
 
Jul 31, 2020 - 2:45pm

I'm looking for a 4 or 5 bedroom place. Any ideas where I might have an easier time finding a bigger apartment? Also, what areas of Brooklyn would you suggest that are easy to commute from?

 
Jul 31, 2020 - 2:52pm

lab862:

I'm looking for a 4 or 5 bedroom place. Any ideas where I might have an easier time finding a bigger apartment? Also, what areas of Brooklyn would you suggest that are easy to commute from?

I lived in a true 4BD place in manhattan and we actually had 5 people looking for 4BR/5BR and there really aren't a lot in the city of Manhattan unless you want to pay the big bucks for a crazy big ass place. So we had to cut one guy out and just get 4 people in a 4 bedroom place. That was one bad ass apartment - big living room - we had tons of parties.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

  • 2
 
Jul 31, 2020 - 3:11pm

They're pretty rare so I'm not sure if they're native to any one area. I would probably start my search in Murray Hill, Union Square and East Village because they tend to have more walkups. But I really don't know and you'll most likely be at the mercy of the supply available. Luckily it's a buyer's market right now. And I haven't lived in Brooklyn so I can't answer that. The two nicest neighborhoods/closest to Manhattan are Dumbo and Williamsburg but they're also the most expensive

 
  • Intern in IB - Ind
Jul 31, 2020 - 6:13pm

East village has great nightlife (the two intern bars are located there, if that gives you any indication), but I would highly advise against living there. Most of the buildings are extremely old and have structural/insulation issues. If you live on the bottom 3 floors of an east village walk up, you'll probably be woken up by drunk people yelling or the local crackhead from alphabet city screaming at 3-4am. Weekend nights (Thursday-Sunday) are also horrendous if you're trying to get some sleep. Saying this just based off of my experience, though. I prefer a much quieter environment.

 
Jul 29, 2020 - 11:49am

ironnchef:

live within walking distance to work

Dude, I don't make a million bucks a year. My old boss has a nice penthouse in Soho. I can't afford that.

I generally see somebody I know on TV on Bloomberg/CNBC etc. once or twice a week. This sounds cool, until I remind myself that I see somebody I know on ESPN five days a week.
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