Calling MDs by their nickname/shortened name (Bobby, Richie, etc)

nontargetscum's picture
Rank: King Kong | 1,781

Changed names for anonymity.

Sent a networking email to an MD named Robert, he replied and signed his email "Best, Bobby." I sent him a follow up email where I called him Bobby. When he emailed me back he had changed his name on his signature to Robert.

tl;dr MDs are petty and don't like to be called Bobby smh

Comments (60)

May 27, 2020

LOL did you deadass call a 50 year old man 'bobby'?

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  • Intern in IB-M&A
May 29, 2020

Bobby Axelrod

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May 27, 2020

I don't think you did anything wrong here.

If somebody lists their name in an email, I'd say it's fair game to call them that.

It is either
1) He listed in lengthened form in email 2 just because it's default in his signature. You can have multiple signatures in Outlook
2) He's playing mind games lol

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May 27, 2020

Paging @DickFuld"

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Funniest
May 27, 2020

when talking with superiors, it's best to use terms of endearment, it keeps it fun in the office. here are some of my faves

champ
sport
slick
chap (bonus points for 'ol chap)
bud
chief
my lord
your highness
your majesty
mr. firstname (like a YMCA camp counselor)

May 29, 2020
thebrofessor:

when talking with superiors, it's best to use terms of endearment, it keeps it fun in the office. here are some of my faves

champ
sport
slick
chap (bonus points for 'ol chap)
bud
chief
my lord
your highness
your majesty
mr. firstname (like a YMCA camp counselor)

Also:
Captain
Tiger
Killer
Boss
Hoss
Bro
Tough Guy
Hollywood
Big (whatever their name is, Big John for example)
Rap-ize their name (B-Rad, or if their name is Paul Garofalo, something like Paulie G, etc)

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May 29, 2020

I lol'd at Hollywood

rap names would be great

Lil Moyni
JimmyG
A$AP Jamie

May 30, 2020

Tex
Slim
Dude
Amigo
Hercules
Rockstar
Playboy
Sailor
Pops
Old Man
Stud

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  • Intern in IB - Ind
May 29, 2020

A VP emailed me and insisted on calling me chief - I was conflicted and confused as to how to reply.

The dude being in his mid 30s was unaware that calling someone chief (or a chief) is an insult amongst Londoners. I wasn't sure if that was a power move on his part or if he was genuinely trying to create a fun team environment. Either way, he was a bit of a cunt.

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May 29, 2020

I really wish I was british or aussie, I would love to call my mates and anyone in general cunts on a regular basis

May 29, 2020

How could you forget Big Man?

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  • Analyst 1 in IB - Ind
May 30, 2020

Meester Johnny

May 29, 2020

That's rich

  • Prospect in Other
May 29, 2020

Bobby Tudor?

May 29, 2020

Dude, are you serious? You NEVER refer to someone that far up the ladder by anything other than Mr./Mrs./Ms. (Last name). The fact you even called him Robert in the initial email is unbelievable. Yes often higher ups will sign off casually (-Bobby) or something informal like "thx for reply". That doesn't matter. Always send professional messages giving them appropriate respect. Only exception is if they explicitly tell you that you can call them a shortened name or just first name (has happened to me) and then its OK.

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May 29, 2020

I think it depends on the work environment and culture of the firm. I definitely prefer someone call me by what I sign at the bottom of my email. First emails or when you don't know the person that well, fine use the "Mr/Ms" title, but if you know the person it gets weird. Again, firm dependent, but I would feel pretty weird with people using such formal language.

May 29, 2020

Yeah, I agree and think quantgrunt is offbase here.

May 29, 2020

I was replying to the OP which is a specific scenario. Please see my comment below to the watchdog

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Most Helpful
May 29, 2020

BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK BARK

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May 29, 2020

I think it is best you use that title on yourself. I was replying to the OP here who is a college UNDERGRADUATE student trying to network with a MANAGING DIRECTOR. I think in that case my comment perfectly holds

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May 29, 2020

wrong wrong wrong and wrong. I read your reply to low eq watch dog - wrong. a lot of mds would think it's weird (unless they're super old school, which even then knowing some super old school mds would still find it weird) to consistently call them Mr. x, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with calling them by their first name in an email

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May 29, 2020

What about trying to show respect to someone 20 years older than me and more knowledgeable?

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May 30, 2020

yea I don't agree with that chief. You're their analyst, not their fifth grade son's friend.

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  • Analyst 3+ in IB - Ind
May 30, 2020

This is why you don't take advice on social skills from a quant

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Jun 2, 2020

Not sure if this is regional specific to wherever you're from, however, in London I can confirm that this is not best practice.
Have you read Dale Carnegie? Unless someone has an official title (Dr. / Sir. / Lord. - relatively common in financial services in London) stick to their first name and don't forget it

May 29, 2020

Some of my professors won't respond without Dr/Professor titled followed by last name. Even Mr/Mrs. doesn't cut it. Has this happened to anyone else?

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May 30, 2020

That hasn't happened to me, but I always address tham by "Hello Professor XXX," and if I'm in person, I'll just say, "Hello Professor," unless in the beginning of the quarter they say, "Oh, and you can just call me by my first name, Bobby."

"Markets can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent."

May 30, 2020

Oh I didn't mean in person lol. I meant in email and it was only a few teachers.

  • Intern in Other
May 30, 2020

At my university (T30 private), I've noticed that the professors who insist on being called by their last name and title usually haven't accomplished anything in their careers. The professors who write in top journals, receive huge grants, and earn prestigious fellowships almost always insist on being called by their first name. Just an observation.

May 30, 2020

I'm not sure if they wouldn't respond explicitly but it is definitely customary to give them the respect due.

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Jun 3, 2020
FutureBankTeller:

Some of my professors won't respond without Dr/Professor titled followed by last name. Even Mr/Mrs. doesn't cut it. Has this happened to anyone else?

That's because they're loser fucking academics that have to manufacture social protocols for respect because their accomplishments are not self-evident.

Thankfully the private sector is a different universe. Pay someone's checks and they'll fucking respect you, you don't need to be slighted by them calling you the common first name that literally everyone else in your life calls you.

"Millionaires don't use astrology, billionaires do"

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May 30, 2020

One of my MD is called Michael, some call him
Mike others call him Micky

May 30, 2020

@Synergy_or_Syzygy" @mergersandacquisitions78" @Armhoo1"

Interested to hear from some VPs/MDs on this topic.

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May 30, 2020

I always use whatever name people sign off with when emailing me. You're probably overthinking it but if he changes his signature, just change what you call him in line. Not going to go around saying "Robert Diamond," "Robert Arnott," "Robert Axelrod" when it should be Bob, Rob, and Bobby.

May 30, 2020

Ok, but nobody ever signs off with the name Mr LastName in any scenario. So how would we know if they want that respect or not?

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  • Analyst 3+ in IB - Ind
May 30, 2020

You did the right thing and you're just overthinking it. Your first email should be addressed to their first name and in subsequent emails you should note how they sign off. If you send an email to an MD named Edward and he signs off "Ted" then you call him Ted. Do not call him "Mr. Goldstein". Believe it or not even when you come in as a first year analyst the culture today is that you are a professional in a professional setting.

May 30, 2020
Comment
  • Prospect in IB - Gen
May 30, 2020