Chicago Booth, Kellogg reps in IBanking

sonibubu's picture
Rank: King Kong | 1,085

Hi guys,
I've been recently accepted into Chicago Booth and wanted to find out its rep among the Ibanking community. I have worked as an engineer and want to transition into an associate role at an I-bank. Will Booth's name help me get my foot into the door as a career switcher, considering how many laid off bankers are out there?

I've also been accepted to Kellogg but have heard it's not as respected on Wall Street. My argument for Kellogg is that there is less i-banking competition (only 10-15% go into banking) so it may be easier to break into banking from Kellogg.

Finally, how does Columbia stack up to these two in terms of rep?

Just my gut feeling here: Harvard/Wharton > Chicago/Columbia > Kellogg

Any suggestions/tips are much appreciated.

thanks!

Region: 
United States - Midwest
United States - Northeast

Comments (26)

Jan 12, 2009

chicago booth is a fantastic b-school

Jan 12, 2009

Chicago booth sucks ass... only businessweek likes those clowns

"Categorical Imperative: If I cannot look at my mother or my wife in the eyes and explain it, I won't do it" - Some British MD.

Jan 13, 2009

"Chicago booth sucks ass... only businessweek likes those clowns" - someone didn't get accepted

Jan 12, 2009
sonibubu:

Just my gut feeling here: Harvard/Wharton > Chicago/Columbia > Kellogg

I think this is a fair assessment. Some might give a slight edge to Columbia over Chicago, primarily based on location. Though this seems superficial, for smaller banks it could be the difference between recruiting or not--e.g. I doubt Perella Weinberg or Moelis make the trip to Chicago (I could be wrong though). If you are focused on the bigger banks then I think there is no difference. They are both equally respected for their academics and particularly their strong finance programs.

I don't know much about Kellogg, but the question to ask is "Do the banks recruit on campus?" and if so, which ones. My guess is the stats say more about how many banks come to recruit rather than how many students are trying to get into banking.

Finally, congrats on both of the acceptances!

Jan 12, 2009

From what I've heard, Northwestern isn't known for finance so much as it is for marketing. From a purely academic, intellectual perspective, Chicago might be the best school in the country to learn finance.

Jan 13, 2009

chicago is a finance powerhouse, though my impression is that it has a more intellectual atmosphere than wharton (ie - students actually care about what they learn in class).

i see more chicago alum in trading and at hedge funds, but there are plenty in p/e and ibd, so you'll have plenty of opportunity.

have you considered trading or a more market-oriented role? an engineering background with a uchicago mba would make you very desirable, though it depends on how the job market looks in ~2 yrs.

Jan 18, 2009
yesman:

have you considered trading or a more market-oriented role? an engineering background with a uchicago mba would make you very desirable, though it depends on how the job market looks in ~2 yrs.

Can you please explain what a "market-oriented role" is exactly. Keep in mind I'm a pure engineer w/ no finance background :)

Jan 13, 2009

Chicago GSB (hate the name Booth) is the clear winner when it comes to IBD.

Jan 13, 2009

Is this all MBA and not Undergrad?

Jan 13, 2009
Crackedeggshell:

Is this all MBA and not Undergrad?

Why would you compare undergraduate schools to business schools like Kellogg?

Jan 13, 2009
rndmacnt:
Crackedeggshell:

Is this all MBA and not Undergrad?

Why would you compare undergraduate schools to business schools like Kellogg?

I should have expressed my question better. I meant to ask if Booth was only for MBA's or if it was for undergrad as well. I am currently trying to gather a list of good undergrad schools for finance in order to apply to them.

Jan 13, 2009

EDIT: Double post.

Jan 13, 2009

Endlessrain, you're saying Chicago is clear cut winner over Columbia as well?

It sounds like the less compeitition to get interview slots at Kellogg doesn't make up for the Ibanking rep advantage of Chicago Booth. Much thanks!

Jan 13, 2009

I graduated from chicago in 2008 and went into s&t. But I know lots of people who went into IB from both schools. When I was there, the odds of landing an IB job at a BB firm were the same from both schools. All the major firms recruited at both, both had strong IB campus groups to help with recruiting, etc. Almost all good candidates who "played the game" in recruiting got multiple offers. Of course this was the fall of 2006, so I am not sure how different it is now. On the margin, the MM shops might be easier from chicago or columbia, but kellogg grads tend to be pretty helpful to their own.

The less competition argument has almost no merit. First, the banks tend to adjust the size of the closed lists based on how many people they liked in recruiting, so it can be proportional to interest. Also, if you aren't good enough to get on the closed lists at Chicago, you wouldn't get the offer from any other school either.

On the academic side, coming from a non-finance background, as I was, Chicago will offer you the best education possible. You can make a much more rigorous and thorough schedule for yourself than you can at kellogg, columbia, wharton, etc. And after meeting my fellow associates from other top schools I stand by this comment 100%.

Jan 13, 2009

Not even a question. Met and have known several Chicago grads in my incoming Associate class at a BB, all smart guys, well trained. For whatever reason, never met a Kellogg. Granted, I went S&T so we were very finance-oriented, but still, I'd say Chicago hands down.

Jan 15, 2009

"Chicago booth sucks ass... only businessweek likes those clowns" - someone didn't get accepted"

Yes, you.

"Categorical Imperative: If I cannot look at my mother or my wife in the eyes and explain it, I won't do it" - Some British MD.

Jan 15, 2009

" "Chicago booth sucks ass... only businessweek likes those clowns" - someone didn't get accepted"

Yes, you. "

Philosphical monkey, you remind me of a kid playing with a discussion board. Be constructive or shut it.

Jan 15, 2009

But why shut it homie?

"Categorical Imperative: If I cannot look at my mother or my wife in the eyes and explain it, I won't do it" - Some British MD.

Jan 16, 2009
philosophical monkey:

But why shut it homie?

Because...

closed mouth = more lip friction

Jan 16, 2009

Ah, I get it... if I am constructive he'll give me a loose BJ, and if I am not he'll give me a tight BJ. Strange fellow. But I can't complain.

Thanks for clarifying, Marcus.

"Categorical Imperative: If I cannot look at my mother or my wife in the eyes and explain it, I won't do it" - Some British MD.

Jan 18, 2009

Probably trading, hedge funds, and Asset Management -mostly anything dealing with securities, where pricing/handling of such is dependent on the market.

The jobs are pretty quant-focused, so your engineering background is highly desirable.

You're definitely smart, as an engineer and getting into bschools, but you might want to research the industry before deciding you want to transition into banking.

Jan 19, 2009
np99sky:

Probably trading, hedge funds, and Asset Management -mostly anything dealing with securities, where pricing/handling of such is dependent on the market.

The jobs are pretty quant-focused, so your engineering background is highly desirable.

You're definitely smart, as an engineer and getting into bschools, but you might want to research the industry before deciding you want to transition into banking.

Thanks for clarifying. Haven't researched that side quite yet. I have a friend who does M&A and that sounded pretty interesting, so that is what I'm initially leaning towards.
During the first 2-3 weeks at Chicago Booth and Kellogg, there will be presentations pretty much every day by banks explaining different areas of banking, etc. Maybe I will find my niche in those few weeks.

Jan 20, 2009
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Jan 21, 2009