Comments (57)

Jun 21, 2018

Literally lay into them, don't be bashful.

    • 4
Funniest
Jun 21, 2018

Catch him slipping outside work, pull up on him and whoop that ass.

    • 56
    • 1
Jun 21, 2018

I like your style good sir

Jun 21, 2018

Way to keep it real Omar

    • 1
Jun 22, 2018

You come at the king, you best not miss

    • 3
Learn More

Side-by-side comparison of top modeling training courses + exclusive discount through WSO here.

Jun 21, 2018

Be the adult and realize it probably comes from a place of insecurity or immaturity. Then decide if the cocky behavior is mostly harmless and you should just ignore it, or if he's hurting himself by rubbing people the wrong way and needs a figurative slap in the face.

If the latter, I suggest slowly adding coins to the handset on his phone. Then one day, take them out.

Jun 21, 2018

did this originate from the office or is this actually a thing? im totally serious lmao

    • 1
Jun 22, 2018

Says the guy with the Kevin profile pic, haha! I would do this if I had enough nickels.

"Dress up, grab a pint, and remember, scared money never wins."
-Anonymous

    • 1
Jun 25, 2018
HighlyClevered:

Be the adult and realize it probably comes from a place of insecurity or immaturity. Then decide if the cocky behavior is mostly harmless and you should just ignore it, or if he's hurting himself by rubbing people the wrong way and needs a figurative slap in the face.

Definitely agree here. It usually is just immaturity/insecurity. If you genuinely want to help, pull them aside, talk to them, and let them know that what they're doing is super transparent. They'll either be embarrassed or angry, and their reaction can guide what you do next.

    • 1
Jun 21, 2018

only one way to deal with it. put them in their place.

"Look man, i don't give a fuck if you got an A in macro-econ, this is the real world and you've been at this for 3 weeks and I've been doing it for 3 years. Go back to your desk and finish this thing, email me when it's done with the project attached and make sure the email reads as though you're addressing the head of the office because i might be asked to forward it to him. Then come check with me to see what's next. and next time bring a pen, notepad and your calculator."

    • 13
Jun 21, 2018

Maybe this isn't your forte, but I've found that it's usually best to give them a dose of their own medicine while still being somewhat subtle. Especially if you're somewhat of a witty person, just make sarcastic comments that somewhat shuts them down in a funny way (within reason) and usually it will put them in their place/shut them up.

    • 1
Jun 22, 2018

eh thats sounds passive aggressive. man up and take @itsanumbersgame approach and just tell them the deal (assuming it wont be an HR issue)

Jun 22, 2018

Yes, it's passive aggressive, but it's much better than being aggressive aggressive when that can have adverse affects on you. The sad reality is that a lot of these kids will have more pull than junior employees will since in a lot of cases they are so-and-so's relative. Think about it.... If someone is that shitty of an intern/unqualified, doubtful that they got in solely on their own merit.

Jun 21, 2018

The best solution is not very creative, but it is extremely effective: no return offer

    • 10
    • 1
Jun 21, 2018

Crush him into dust and try rebuilding him. You must crush his soul before the rebuilding can begin.

    • 7
Jun 21, 2018

"We can rebuild him... but I don't want to spend a lot of money..."

    • 7
Jun 22, 2018

"The $80,000 Intern," coming this summer to a Bulge Bracket near you.

    • 4
Jun 21, 2018

He could be brainwashed by crap like Shark Tank and Boiler Room. Try to coach him on his decorum so he can become an asset to your team.

If he is too cocky to learn, then yes, go to war and break him down until he gets it.

    • 2
Jun 21, 2018

give him menial tasks like fetching coffee

What concert costs 45 cents? 50 Cent feat. Nickelback.

    • 1
    • 1
Jun 21, 2018

take a SS of his desktop and set it as his background

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

    • 8
Jun 21, 2018

Evil.

"Work ethic, work ethic" - Vince Vaughn
Jun 22, 2018

This is why internships exist - so people can learn to function in the workplace. Grab a colleague, pull him into a meeting room, and tell him that everyone has noticed this behavior and it's unacceptable in a professional environment, especially as an intern.

If he's still a bad guy; then rip him with work and ding him on the offer. But you'll be doing him a favor in the long run if you have this conversation and he listens.

    • 5
Jun 22, 2018

Dude this post isn't even funny. Unless the kid is being malicious about it, don't be a fucking child in response.

    • 17
Jun 22, 2018

Actually dealt with a similar situation this summer. I pulled the kid aside, she was nice, but clearly either didn't get it or was trying too hard to assert herself. I essentially was like "what's the deal here? Why did you do x, do you think that's proper?" And we had a nice conversation for about 20 mins. Ultimately I believe she was just trying to fit in as everyone is very assertive in meetings on our team, but took it too far. She's toned it down and if she keeps it up I think she'll get an offer.

    • 3
Jun 22, 2018

This was VERY nice of you, but I think this type of response is highly, highly out of the ordinary in a work setting like IB. As I mentioned in my comment below, I think most full-timers would write this person off, and the immediate poor impression this person made would be the lasting impression for the summer.

    • 1
    • 1
Jun 22, 2018

I agree with this advice. In the past, I've dealt with bad intern behavior by pulling the person aside and explaining where they've gone wrong and how they can correct their attitude/behavior. If it's done respectfully and you make it clear that you're acting in their own best interest, the advice is usually pretty well-received.

Years later, a former summer intern (who ended up getting a return offer after some pretty egregious behavior) still thanks me for setting him straight. There may be some bad apples, but I believe a lot of interns are only acting a certain way to "fit in" or impress their class and will correct their behavior quickly if you (nicely) call them out on it.

    • 6
Jun 22, 2018
Chimp scampi:

Any creative subtle solutions on dealing with a cocky intern who likes to re-iterate everything you say and talk over you?

She repeats everything you say?

Jun 22, 2018

If he reiterates everything you say and you come here complaining is probably because whenever he does so you keep your mouth shut otherwise you wouldn't have felt bothered if you had argued against him. Stand up for yourself, prove him wrong on his assertions and impose respect. If you do that once it should suffice for him to stop. However, if you just stay quiet you're exposing a weaker side of yours and giving him room to keep belittling you and the things you say. I'd even argue what you're dealing with is bullying but to a lesser degree.

Jun 22, 2018

My thoughts: An internship is a trial run to assess fit and competency. Given that there is a 1000:1 demand for every seat on the street, why should I be responsible for telling an intern that his behavior is inappropriate or otherwise be his life coach for 10 weeks? I don't get why everyone is saying to pull the kid aside or give him some kind of life lesson. Interns are there to make an impression, hopefully a positive one, and I'm there to get my job done with hopefully some of their help. If an intern can't act professionally and deliver decent work, then this job is not the right one for that person.

    • 3
    • 3
Jun 22, 2018
iggs99988:

My thoughts: An internship is a trial run to assess fit and competency. Given that there is a 1000:1 demand for every seat on the street, why should I be responsible for telling an intern that his behavior is inappropriate or otherwise be his life coach for 10 weeks? I don't get why everyone is saying to pull the kid aside or give him some kind of life lesson. Interns are there to make an impression, hopefully a positive one, and I'm there to get my job done with hopefully some of their help. If an intern can't act professionally and deliver decent work, then this job is not the right one for that person.

Why not try to help someone out? What do you lose?

    • 2
Jun 22, 2018

I lose my time and have the assurance that 98% of the coaching time is a waste of breath. Intelligent people should be able to pick up on cues in a professional setting or task-related cues quickly. Investment banking is not a hand holding business; none of the (good) bankers I know ever had their hand held or were mentored; they just "got it".

    • 8
Jun 22, 2018

Hook up a secret wireless mouse and do a haunted computer situation
Better yet, hook up a secret keyboard and talk shit to him whenever he types

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

    • 6
Jun 22, 2018

I like my team and I might actually have to try the secret keyboard hahaha

Jun 22, 2018

I wrote out a decent response about explaining how the world works to the kid, then re-read your message.

For clarity, is the intern re-iterating what you've said to prove they understand the statement / ask? Because that's arguably a good thing, perhaps they just need to figure out timing on when to re-iterate? When dealing with inexperienced juniors I make them take notes and then repeat back what the ask is, and when it's due by.

May sound like I'm criticising, it could also be the delivery, is the kid interrupting because you're not leaving room for a reply? That said, if the kid is a cocky shit, the answer (unless they are some BSD's kid) is to take them to a break-out room and explain that fit and attitude are as important as anything else in recruiting, and if you were asked today on whether the bank should provide an offer, what your response would be.

You have to be the adult, part of your job at every level is to recruit and develop talent for the bank, it's part of what gets you promoted and top ranked.

    • 4
Jun 22, 2018

Thanks overpaid, good advice. Maybe some self reflection is also due here. Perhaps I should give the kid more room to shine (he likes to differentiate himself by "showcasing"). Meanwhile, he also needs to understand that certain behavior is just plain rude...

Jun 22, 2018

I'd also coach. It reflects on your own maturity how you handle this situation. You'll be a better manager/leader down the line if you learn how to first approach these situations with direct feedback.

Set aside a coffee chat, ask how they think they're performing and whether they think they're on track for an offer. When they reply (probably enthusiastically yes, based on what you've written) you sternly put them in their place. "Your technical skills are aligned with where they should be, but you need to work on your soft skills. Here are 2-3 examples. Continuing in this manner will not only jeopardize your offer but will affect your ability to succeed at other firms".

You can also note that most of your peers would not have an open discussion on this matter, and you're doing them a favor.

If they take it to heart, you might gain a stellar intern. You might also gain their appreciation. If they don't, then, yeah, fuck em over at offer time.

You'd expect that a supervisor would give you direct feedback on underperformance, whether hard or soft skills, well before they fucked you over. Do the same.

    • 3
Jun 22, 2018

Ultimately, people rise to the level of their competency matched with leadership abilities. Worker bees come in all flavors. S/he will ultimately fail as it becomes clear that others don't want to be around him / her. Entry level is about learning the job, but also demonstrating you are the type of person the firm wants in front of clients, leading groups, etc. This individual will either learn that and get in line or they won't (and be left out of true opportunity ). At the end of the day, it works itself out.

    • 2
Jun 22, 2018

I, personally, would use the Lazard patented printer slap.

"one for the money two for the better green 3 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine" - M.F. Doom

    • 2
Jun 22, 2018

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

Jun 23, 2018

I swear, this industry has so many non-confrontational and awkward dudes. Just tell him straight up he's gotta tone it down a little. Let him know for his own good that dudes who have been grinding it out in the office for the last handful of years don't want to hear it from a college kid who thinks he's a genius because he's read about the industry in a textbook and done a couple case studies.

I was a little too comfortable my first year out of college, way back when I was still in IB and I really appreciated a Senior Analyst telling me one day that I had to have a little more of a filter when talking to superiors because it was coming off as borderline irreverent. I was like oh, shit, I can completely see how I could be coming off poorly, thanks for letting me know.

    • 1
    • 1
Jul 2, 2018

And then you decided to make an account called "REPE God".

    • 1
Jul 2, 2018

Hahahaha yeah pretty much.

    • 1
Jun 24, 2018

Bro if you can come up with Chimp Scampi, I think you can easily come across some ways to burn an intern.

Seriously though that name is gold.

    • 2
Jun 24, 2018

The amount of people unwilling to help out an SA is outstanding, is an SA that threatening?

First few times in a work environment, no one is going to get it right from the get go. Realistically if you as a more experienced employee want to make it further up the totem pole, you are going to have to develop the people below you. That's part of managing, you need to actually be able to run a team and interact and to some extent mould certain personalities and behaviours.

I'd understand the responses if this was a peer, but the kid is just trying to learn how to progress in the working world.

I think you'd learn a huge amount about wether or not the SA should be a return candidate from how they respond to constructive criticism - so many grown adults in finance are unable to take a hint of criticism or dish out anything remotely constructive - and at much higher levels than SA - if they respond well, that's great, it shows adaptability and emotional intelligence and bodes well for the future. If they don't respond well and sulk or retreat, then you might get a sense they are not the right fit for the group.

More senior guys that go in hard on you without reason just come across as pathetic and insecure, and ultimately makes it easy to lose respect for them.

Jun 25, 2018

Good advice. Thanks GMG.

Jun 25, 2018

Wait till he leaves his desktop open when he leaves his desk and send out an email to entire group...let your creativity guide you from there.

    • 1
    • 1
Jun 29, 2018

Pull him aside and let him know that he's not performing to the standard, and that he should take the lead from full time guys. He'll get the picture...or he won't.

"Anything less than the best is a felony"

Jun 29, 2018

First time post in awhile. Would love to know from FT employees who are at banks what the general intern scene has been like this summer. I ask because some friend and I were just speculating about it...wonder how much the rise of finance meme/instagram accounts are impacting these kids (and not in good ways). I can just imagine interns showing up on day 1 with "deal sleds" and already throwing finance jokes around the office thinking they are doing a good job at fitting in with the scene.

"Back in my day" we only had EBITDAD but now there is so much content out there.

    • 1
Jun 29, 2018

You could ask him how much he made last year.

Jul 1, 2018

Most of you guys sound like insecure and immature asshats. This is why internships exist, to help people know how to function at work. It's not that hard to give him feedback on this in a helpful and professional way.

Jul 1, 2018

There are so many ridiculous posts on this thread. Just pull him into an office and have a real conversation with the kid. Interns are there to learn not to be the perfect co-worker...

Keep it honest, stern, and growth-oriented.

"Hey listen, I understand you're young but there are a couple things you may not be aware you're doing which not only bother me personally but will hold you back in your career if they continue unchecked. Name your first point... name your second point... I find it incredibly disrespectful what you're doing, and so do my superiors. Let's both move forward from this conversation, you're a hard worker and show solid potential, but you need to fix these things if you want to be a truly successful banker. Work with me and we'll get you there."

    • 3
Jul 2, 2018

i would remind him that a career is a long time and relationships are a piece of the puzzle they do not teach in school. His actions today could have a lasting impact on his future prospects and its best to start his career on his best foot until his performance speaks for itself.

Use it as a learning tool to help the kid.

Jul 3, 2018
Comment
Jul 6, 2018