Continental Europe: Master in Finance

toliss's picture
Rank: Chimp | banana points 14

Hi,

I am a recent Economist form Greece and I would like to continue my studies with a master in Accounting and Finance or Finance. I think the latter is going to be my option.

My profile is:
Economics Graduate (with distinction - 1st) in a greek university
IELTS score 7
Previous volunteering work experience in a Student Association (AIESEC in sales department), organising events (debate championship, conferences) BUT no related finance work experience/internships
AWARDS: Best paper in Finance and in Human Resource Management in my university, semi-finalist in a Business Simulator Competition
Research in Finance - Risk Management
GMAT: not attempt
Spoken languages: Greek, English, willing to learn a new language
Previous Exchange programs (ERASMUS) for 6 months at KU LEUVEN

So, my options about a master in continental Europe are:

KU Leuven MSc in Business Engineering Major in Finance (Belgium)
KU Leuven MSc in Financial & Actuarial Engineering (Belgium)
Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University Advanced MSc in Finance and Investments (Netherlands)
University of Amsterdam MSc in Finance (Netherlands)
Tilburg University MSc in Finance (Netherlands)
University of Vienna MSc in Banking and Finance (Austria)
WU University MSc Quantitative Finance (Austria - I think is waste of time)

The question that is raised is: "Which uni I should opt for my Master in terms of good employability after my graduation" if you bare in mind that I can't afford an expensive UK master with 20k+ fees. Additionally, I know that you are planning to do a master in the country which you would like to work and live, but in terms of market conditions (salary, job placements) which country should I choose Belgium or Netherlands? Do you know any other uni with a good potential in terms of the above?Deliberately, I didn't put on the list St. Gallen University (Swiss) and SSE (Stockholm) due to high living cost.

Finally, do you think my profile with a decent gmat score is going to be able to secure a scholarship/tuition wavier from UK top school?

Thank you in advance for your time

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Comments (104)

Jul 10, 2017

Not sure how helpful this is since you haven't taken the GMAT, but I think the best pick from that list would be Rotterdam.

Jul 11, 2017

From this list RSM

Nicest haircut than Bateman

Jul 15, 2017

Any other suggestions in the continental Europe?

Jul 15, 2017

Thank you very much for your response.

Do you think that the master in Financial and Actuarial Engineering at KU LEUVEN is it going to be a versatile shot? You can work in finance and actuary industry, with the latter presages a better/balanced working environment? In addition, Belgium and more specifically Brussels are the center of Europe with a great social security level.

Jul 15, 2017

Yes I think he's fine. Tbh Idk so much about that part of Europe.
Have you just looked at Bocconi, WHU, St Gallen, ESCP, ESSEC etc?
I think would be a better bet

Nicest haircut than Bateman

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Jul 19, 2017

Thank you for your response but these unis have high tuition fees

Jul 19, 2017

Pending GMAT, I am sure that some of these will award some form of scholarship

Nov 26, 2017

Stockholm School of Economics (SSE), M.Sc. in Finance (2 years program).

As a Greek (EU) citizen, there are no tuiton fees at this [very highly regarded] school.

Jul 20, 2017

RSM from your list.

Nova School of Business and Econ is EUR11,500 in Portugal
Durham University is GBP14,500 in the UK

Nov 26, 2017

You have a startup with a valuation of EU2mm and you want to sell it to work for someone else? Why?

Anyway, with 660 you are more or less competitive at all the schools. If I were in your shoes, just apply to all the schools you mentioned and add Bocconi to your list and Cambridge.

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Nov 26, 2017

I want to sell it to have a big amount of own capital to launch my own emerging market public and private HF. The co-founder guy applies to CMU/Berkeley/Baruch MFE programs and gains trading experience; he will bring the public portfolio. I want to bring the private one, this is why I want some PE or BB IB FO experience.

I heard that Bocconi's career center sucks and Cambridge favors Asians with high-grades and scores. I'm just above average with a not so good GMAT. Have you heard about that?

Thanks!

Nov 26, 2017

That's quite a long-term career plan you have there.
I never heard that Cambridge favors anyone and I did alright besides having a shitty career center at Bocconi.

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Jul 22, 2017

Fellow Greek here. Well done on your achievements. What can help you determine your choice of school is to decide where you want to live afterwards. If you want to live in Holland, however, aim primarily for RSM. Bear in mind that if you're aiming for universities in Flanders or the Netherlands, you should also start learning Dutch. It may not be a prerequisite for admission, BUT it will help you considerably to get a job there (after all, the Master there is only a year in length). Plus Dutch is as English as a foreign language can get so it shouldn't be a problem.

You also listed two Austrian universities. If you want to work in the DACH region (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) you need to speak German. The better you speak German, the better.

Back on the matter Belgium vs Netherlands, I personally believe the Netherlands have a better labour market than Belgium. Also, bear in mind that we Greeks speak Greek and English. The Flemish are trilingual in Dutch, English, and French, maybe German in some instances. That's your competition in Belgium. In the Netherlands the Dutch speak Dutch and English. Ab initio your chances are much better in the Netherlands.

Like others have said here, sit your GMAT and see what your options are. If your grades are better than 8/10, given a good GMAT, you can strike scholarships for universities like Bocconi and St. Gallen. Given that you've been an AIESECer yourself (like I have - iGCDPer here) and your research etc, you stand a good chance of getting a scholarship. But think about it.

And while you're at it, mate, finish your national service before studying abroad. You don't want to get lucrative job offers and be bogged down by the Hellenic Army back home. But that's my suggestion.

Kali syneheia.

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Nov 26, 2017
Nov 26, 2017

bocconi, WHU, EBS (the german one), st gallen, and SSE

Nov 26, 2017

Hmm, I don't think I blogged about that german school. Europe has so many good programs it really is hard to say. Cambridge, oxford, lse, lbs, st gallen, bocconi, hec, etc.

Www.msfhq.com

Nov 26, 2017

I'm currently doing a Masters in Finance at LSE. It's pretty good and offers a decent variety of courses for your elective modules. The networking side is reasonable and you get to interact with people from the part-time course (i.e. people who are working in the industry).

Nov 26, 2017

I want to know about the best Masters Programmes in Finance/related fileds. To provide everyone with a quick background, I hold a Bachelors degree in Business Studies from Delhi University with my majors in Finance. I have also cleared CFA level 1 and I recently took the level 2 exam, the result of which will be out by the end of July. I have been working with a financial research company - Capital IQ (a subsidiary of Mc-Graw Hill Financials) since August 2010.

please suggest the schools i should target and the courses i should look for the next year's session.

p.s.- Could you also help guide me with any research opportunities at the school, because I would want to carry on to do my PhD and eventually enter academic research/teaching as a long term goal?

Aug 10, 2017

If you go to vienna (which I would not reccomend if IB is your goal) I would definitely choose WU over the University of Vienna!

Nov 26, 2017

I would throw ESADE in tier 2 as well. And I'd also suggest that while rankings are generally an ok way to gauge the relative value of a program, it really depends on where you want to work afterwards. For example, I wouldn't go to Bocconi if I wanted to work in the German-speaking regions of EU, so in that case HSG, WHU, Goethe, etc would win. But if the choice is between Bocconi and IE to work in London, Bocconi takes the cake.

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Nov 26, 2017

Interesting.. Thank you, its been edited. I want to work on an International scale tho, meaning i wouldnt mind working in London, but I'd also want to work in Asia (Middle East, India, etc.), thats why i said "on an International scale" :)

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Nov 26, 2017

Lol what a nonsensical ranking. Ranking according to placements and brand value GLOBALLY:

Tier 1

LBS

Tier 2

HEC/LSE/Oxbridge

Tier 3

SSE/Rotman/IE/ESADE/Bocconi/Imperial/Warwick etc

Tier 4

Rest

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Nov 26, 2017
wanttoberich13:

Lol what a nonsensical ranking. Ranking according to placements and brand value GLOBALLY:

Tier 1

LBS

Tier 2

HEC/LSE/Oxbridge

Tier 3

SSE/Rotman/IE/ESADE/Bocconi/Imperial/Warwick etc

Tier 4

Rest

It's hilarious how you call the original ranking nonsense and then you go and out together a ranking with the emphasis on GLOBAL BRAND VALUE and lump HEC with LSE AND OXBRIDGE. Oxbridge alone is it's own category if it's global.

Nov 26, 2017
Matrick:
wanttoberich13:

Lol what a nonsensical ranking. Ranking according to placements and brand value GLOBALLY:

Tier 1

LBS

Tier 2

HEC/LSE/Oxbridge

Tier 3

SSE/Rotman/IE/ESADE/Bocconi/Imperial/Warwick etc

Tier 4

Rest

It's hilarious how you call the original ranking nonsense and then you go and out together a ranking with the emphasis on GLOBAL BRAND VALUE and lump HEC with LSE AND OXBRIDGE. Oxbridge alone is it's own category if it's global.

By global brand value, I am not referring to joe bloggs, you numpty.

Global brand value to get a job. LSE and HEC have as many successful alumni as Oxbridge :)

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Nov 26, 2017
wanttoberich13:
Matrick:
wanttoberich13:

Lol what a nonsensical ranking. Ranking according to placements and brand value GLOBALLY:

Tier 1

LBS

Tier 2

HEC/LSE/Oxbridge

Tier 3

SSE/Rotman/IE/ESADE/Bocconi/Imperial/Warwick etc

Tier 4

Rest

It's hilarious how you call the original ranking nonsense and then you go and out together a ranking with the emphasis on GLOBAL BRAND VALUE and lump HEC with LSE AND OXBRIDGE. Oxbridge alone is it's own category if it's global.

By global brand value, I am not referring to joe bloggs, you numpty.

Global brand value to get a job. LSE and HEC have as many successful alumni as Oxbridge :)

Ah stahp it you silly...ox and cam are just around 600-700 years longer in existence than lse and HEC but surely there are just as many successful alumni. Then again, you probably have your own little unique definition of success and thus you'll go now and educate how you were only talking about finance obviously, no? And if that doesn't work either because Oxbridge are still the bigger and more well known brand in Europe, you'll include what?

Nov 26, 2017
Matrick:
wanttoberich13:
Matrick:
wanttoberich13:

Lol what a nonsensical ranking. Ranking according to placements and brand value GLOBALLY:

Tier 1

LBS

Tier 2

HEC/LSE/Oxbridge

Tier 3

SSE/Rotman/IE/ESADE/Bocconi/Imperial/Warwick etc

Tier 4

Rest

It's hilarious how you call the original ranking nonsense and then you go and out together a ranking with the emphasis on GLOBAL BRAND VALUE and lump HEC with LSE AND OXBRIDGE. Oxbridge alone is it's own category if it's global.

By global brand value, I am not referring to joe bloggs, you numpty.

Global brand value to get a job. LSE and HEC have as many successful alumni as Oxbridge :)

Ah stahp it you silly...ox and cam are just around 600-700 years longer in existence than lse and HEC but surely there are just as many successful alumni. Then again, you probably have your own little unique definition of success and thus you'll go now and educate how you were only talking about finance obviously, no? And if that doesn't work either because Oxbridge are still the bigger and more well known brand in Europe, you'll include what?

What you on about man - are you a fucking loser?

By alumni I am obviously talking about living alumni. LSE and HEC have as many PROMINENT alumni as Oxbridge too, geddit dumbass?

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Nov 26, 2017

Is HEC really over Bocconi/Warwick? I'd put HEC in tier 3

Nov 26, 2017

Its is indeed Nonesense. I just wrote what i picked up from other posts/threads/forums. Thank you for the clarification !

In regards to the tier 3 and tier 4 (REST) universities, which one of those are internationally recognized? especially in the Middle East and Asia Pacific?

And what do u mean by "etc." in Tier 3 ?, can u give me the whole list of the universities ? :)

Thank you :)

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Nov 26, 2017

Love this argument. Wonder who is winning. Haha.
@"Matrick": I wouldn't be arguing with someone who has gotten 18:1 as their monkey shit to banana points ratio.

Nov 26, 2017

It's cos people can't hack the truth.

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Nov 26, 2017

It all makes sense now. Thanks.

Nov 26, 2017

Where are ESCP and ESSEC?

Nov 26, 2017

dayum..

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Nov 26, 2017

One professor told me this (he had an MBA from Stanford). In terms of the European business schools:
LBS > LSE > Cambridge/Oxford > Imperial, with LBS being the only target school. He did not mention HEC, so I am not so sure. Please notice that this is only for the European schools.

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Nov 26, 2017

Stop posting the bullshit your professor told you over and over again in different topics. From reading all your comments, you seem to have no clue what you're talking about, especially since we're talking about Europe here.

Nov 26, 2017

I have a question for all of you. What about FT ranking? It's not even close with your personal rankings, why?

Nov 26, 2017

Easy my friend. I enjoyed your hostile behaviour, but easy. These are all personal opinions. I have no idea of the European system, so that is why I added: one professor told me. I have never studied in any one of those universities although I might be. I tried my best to get hold on those renowned professors in the University of Toronto to know if Imperial is good enough, and the response is somewhat same. When it comes to the Business school ranking, only LBS matters in North America (I believe OP would be interested to know that).

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Aug 10, 2017

Another Greek here. I will be in St,Gallen this year for Masters and i can tell you that 1) St.Gallen doesnt give scholarships to foreigners and even if it did the tuition is low , the living costs are the problem.
2) I do not fully agree with the argument that to work in DACH you need German. You need German for client facing positions but for middle office or BO positions you don't. And spending a year in a MO or BO to learn German is not such a big deal. (especially with the ridiculous salaries in Zurich). With you profile (and given that you score above 690 in GMAT) i would say give a shot to MBF in St.Gallen it's reputation in the region is REALLY good.

Another option for you could be Bocconi, the 2 years finance program is very reputable even in London. The tuition is high but bocconi gives merit scholarships with high GMAT (720+) . And even if you don't get the merit there are need based scholarships from Bocconi. I know the procedure because i applied , got accepted but lost the scholarship because of a bureaucratic bullshit. Ofc you need to learn Italian to hedge the possibility of not finding a job in London and probably live with the really low salaries of Milan which are not far from the Greek salaries in similar positions if you acount cost of living.

Aug 11, 2017

Well in Germany, where I personally want to go, I can attest that the better you speak German, the better your chances will be. German employers in general demand it - maybe not so much in back office financial positions in Frankfurt-am-Main, as you said, but in other roles and even cities, like Hamburg, Cologne etc. many jobs posted, even the Werkstudent roles, demand for the most part fluency in English and German. It's not impossible, however, but knowing German beforehand helps immensely. I personally have the C1 in German so, given that after my national service I will go for the C2, I am not fazed.

Also we Greeks tend to be at a disadvantage in that, in the German market, the Germans we will be competing with tend to have 2-3 internships under their belts as well as Werkstudent experience (basically 15/hr week in companies) in several instances. This is virtually unheard of here. You can confirm it on LinkedIn. In Germany, business administration is a saturated field, hence one needs: a) internships and/or work experience (the more, the merrier), b) good German and English, c) specialisation, d) foreign volunteering experiences. Any other foreign language you know is a bonus (mind you, most Germans who go for another foreign language opt for Spanish or French). So, any work experience and internships Tolis gets will be a big plus and should help.

Now this is based on what I've been able to ascertain looking at German forums (studis.de, wiwitreff.de etc). Finance is slightly different because more and more foreigners go to Frankfurt-am-Main to work in Finance, especially Americans. What I said holds true for the German labour market in general. Also, the real advantage of good German knowledge is networking. When you, alongside Germans, Americans, Turks etc. are competing for a job, speaking German well as a foreigner will be a huge plus with networking. Even if you don't need it for back office, it helps.

Bear in mind, however, that Tolis wants to go to the Netherlands or Belgium (from what I gather, to Flanders specifically). The Netherlands and Flanders (I am excluding Wallonia because unemployment is high there and they speak French almost by exclusivity) are completely different as far as the labour market is concerned. If you look at LinkedIn, many Finance jobs in Belgium (specifically, Brussels and Antwerp) demand fluent Dutch and very good knowledge of French and English. This is because Belgium is a bilingual country and the Flemish (your competition) will undoubtedly speak these languages well. Unless Tolis knows French and Dutch well, he's going to struggle.

Hence, realistically speaking, if he wants to go to the Benelux region, he can't go wrong with RSM. He will be getting job and internship offers by the bucketload (many of which however, will demand a level of Dutch) - but that's manageable within a year or so. Ideally, as soon as he gets admitted I believe he should start learning Dutch. Like I said for German, he will need at least a rudimentary level of Dutch to be considered for work. He might not need it for networking (the Dutch speak English tremendously well) but it helps if he can speak Dutch at B1/B2.

In general, as it is his decision, he should IMHO decide where he wants to go beforehand. Then he should apply at a relevant university and then start learning the language. Wherever you go, whether you want to or not, you're gonna learn the language eventually. But, albeit not entirely necessary in finance, it helps, especially with networking.

Nov 26, 2017

I think you've mentioned many of the good programmes in the UK (LBS FA, LSE MSc AccFin, LSE MSc Fin). I'd alsao add Imperial (MSc FinAcc, MSc Fin), and Oxford (MFE) to your list. For other one year programmes, I think HEC Paris is a solid choice too. Obviously, with you targeting Scandinavia, SSE is the obvious pick there but it is 2 years instead of one, though that may help you as you could benefit with an IBD internship before recruiting for full time grad positions (doing an internship is also a good way for getting a grad role anyway, by converting). If you aren't against two year programmes then consider Boconni too.

Nov 26, 2017

Your list looks good but definitely apply to Bocconi as well. Since you speak German and have EU citizenship HSG (St. Gallen) could also be very good for you. Go on their website and use their admissions scorecard to see if you'll get in.

If you don't mind the cost of schools in England also consider Warwick, Imperial, and LSE (Accounting and Finance is easier to get into than MSc Finance for LSE).

Also, it would probably be useful to retake the GMAT and get your quant score up because MSc Finance programs tend to care more about quant than verbal.

Nov 26, 2017

Thank you for your help! I will apply to those schools as well. I signed up for another GMAT in February. Do you think I should wait for the results or apply to some of the schools already and send in the scores later?

Nov 26, 2017

I'd say check each school to see when the deadlines are. LSE, Warwick, and HSG are rolling admissions so you can probably wait until you retake to apply to those (but apply the day you get your scores because spots are probably filling up quickly this late in). Bocconi's round 2 deadline is tomorrow but their round 3 deadline is late in February so for that school definitely go round 3 since you won't have time to apply by tomorrow. Also the Bocconi app is one that you'll want to begin preparing early because I think it requires you to translate your transcript to Italian (but I could be remembering wrong).

For the rest, check the deadlines for IE, ESADE, and RSM to see if you can wait until you've retaken the test.

Really focus on getting your quant score up though. For many of these programs quant outweighs the verbal component. I personally took the GRE and Magoosh was a fantastic source for math practice - I've heard its similarly good for the GMAT.

Nov 26, 2017

Thank you for your help!

Nov 26, 2017
econecon101:

<

p>Your list looks good but definitely apply to Bocconi as well. Since you speak German and have EU citizenship HSG (St. Gallen) could also be very good for you.

+1. PM me if you want to know more about either

Nov 26, 2017

I'm a new user and apparently I have to wait two days before I can send private messages. I will send you one when I can.

Nov 26, 2017

You should be able to find admission requirements on the school's website.

Nov 26, 2017

We need more information as that's just a piece to the puzzle. It also depends on your gmat score, work experience, and the quality of your undergrad school (non-target or target).

Nov 26, 2017

gmat score is pending. I have one internship experience (finance related) and one work experience (non finance related). I am currently at the American University of Paris. Not very known but not a bad school.

Nov 26, 2017

You have a decent background with a finance internship and you've taken a lot of quant courses (fin/stats), but your grades are lower than the average at most top msc programs, so I would suggest studying a lot for the GMAT and attempt to get a score close to 700. if you get 670+, apply to like ESADE, RSM, SSE, LBS, Boccini and if you get 700+, apply to all the top programs.

Nov 26, 2017

Thanks for the info.

Nov 26, 2017

Get a 700+ GMAT and you'll be fine. Have you looked at any universities in particular?

Nov 26, 2017

Will try and do so. Ideally I would like to do my masters at one of the top french schools such has ESCP HEC etc.

Nov 26, 2017
fabpierre13:

Will try and do so. Ideally I would like to do my masters at one of the top french schools such has ESCP HEC etc.

ESCP should not be a problem, even if your GMAT is not above 700. HEC will require you to have a GMAT north of 720.

Nov 26, 2017

Maybe also wanna follow this thread: http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/which-school...
A 690 may be perceived as weak at HEC Paris, but you may be lucky because you have a good gpa and good internships.

For all other French schools you're def competitive.

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Nov 26, 2017

Thanks!
What about UK msc finance ? :)

Nov 26, 2017

Oxford difficult, afaik Cambridge doesn't ask for a GMAT, LSE depending on the program, Imperial competitive, LBS MiM potentially (not sure you even want to consider this). All the others I can't tell.

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Nov 26, 2017

All MBB and the big consulting firm recruit from LBS MiM. Just look at their placements report. However, since there are 100+ students in class, you'd have work hard for that.

Nov 26, 2017

Why not LSE? Even though your GMAT is maybe slightly below what is expected, you would have a good shot at getting in. If you want a French school per se definitely go for HEC. By far the best French Masters in Finance programme.

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Best Response
Nov 26, 2017

I would say that your profile makes you competitive for most (pre-experience) masters in finance/management in Europe. The absolute top (HEC, SIM at St. Gallen, ESCP, etc.) might be a slight reach based on your gmat score but I would certainly not rule them out.

I would do the following (take it with a grain of salt):

  • Decide whether you want to go more towards finance or business/consulting (such a choice will not close doors; you can still go into consulting after doing a masters in finance)
  • Take the top 10/15 for the relevant master
  • Narrow it down by roughly half based on location preferences (both during your studies and for potential full-time employment), potential scholarships, language issues, etc.
  • Include a safety school or two if you are not too confident in your chances; you could also include a couple masters from the "other side" (i.e. management if you want to go towards finance) if you really feel like they would be a good fit for you
Nov 26, 2017

The thing with Rotterdam/St Gallen/Bocconi/SSE is that their brand power is very regional. For example, nobody in Spain or Ireland will know much about them or recognize them as top tier unis. However, within their own countries they have quasi-Harvard kudos.

As a result, I believe it is only worth enrolling in those schools if you are planning to stay in the Netherlands, Switzerland, Italy or Sweden respectively. For a global career, you are better off attending Imperial or Warwick in the UK, which have a strong presence in London and also have some brand power in Asia.

LSE is great, but they are turning over too many graduates per year because they have loads of financially related masters, so it is not as exclusive as Oxford and Cambridge.

Finally, some of the top MBA schools (like LBS) are now offering masters as well, so you may want to check non-US MBA rankings like this one: http://equity-research.com/top-international-busin....

Nov 26, 2017

LBS has a 1 year MBA also.

Nov 26, 2017

interesting, good stuff.. so basically youd say i was right with my analysis of sse gallen bocconi etc being like the 2nd tier mbas?

Nov 26, 2017
shorttheworld:

interesting, good stuff.. so basically youd say i was right with my analysis of sse gallen bocconi etc being like the 2nd tier mbas?

2nd tier definitely.

People like Coldplay and voted for the Nazis, you can't trust people Jeremy

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Nov 26, 2017
Jorge:
shorttheworld:

interesting, good stuff.. so basically youd say i was right with my analysis of sse gallen bocconi etc being like the 2nd tier mbas?

2nd tier definitely.

lol
so wrong guys

in terms of London IB recruiting, the MSc Finance programs listed above are top tier

the best MSc Finance programs in Europe are:

LSE
Oxford
Cambridge
HEC
Bocconi
SSE
St Gallen

Bocconi, SSE and St. Gallen may be in the 2nd tier of the top tier, but are nowhere close to being actual second tier.

Nov 26, 2017
shorttheworld:

interesting, good stuff.. so basically youd say i was right with my analysis of sse gallen bocconi etc being like the 2nd tier mbas?

In my opinion, it's only worth paying for a masters in LBS, Oxford, Cambridge or LSE. Anything else, whether you wanna call it lower upper tier or upper lower tier just doesn't have enough brand value.

Nov 26, 2017
dacasale:
shorttheworld:

interesting, good stuff.. so basically youd say i was right with my analysis of sse gallen bocconi etc being like the 2nd tier mbas?

In my opinion, it's only worth paying for a masters in LBS, Oxford, Cambridge or LSE. Anything else, whether you wanna call it lower upper tier or upper lower tier just doesn't have enough brand value.

i'm sorry but this is very poor advice

the city of london is literally teeming with Bocconi, HEC, and SSE grads....all of the bulge bracket banks actively target these schools, and these schools have plenty of brand value.

that's like saying there is no point in going to Michigan because it isn't Harvard

Nov 26, 2017

well i guess its good that st gallen and sse are free then lol (essentially)

are certain programs better for doing asset management? st gallen's looked pretty wide ranging with electives and its swiss influence might point towards AM...

Nov 26, 2017

I completely agree regarding Bocconi, HEC and SSE. These are completely top tier for anyone wanting to work in London. I would also like to make the point that with your Msc Fin from these European institutions you are eligible for an Analyst position, whereas the MBA degree is obviously for those making the move into Associate roles... difficult to compare the two.

I would say a lot comes down to what kind of background and work experience you already have when deciding which will be a better path for you as an individual...

Nov 26, 2017
DavidKappoKaplan:

I completely agree regarding Bocconi, HEC and SSE. These are completely top tier for anyone wanting to work in London. I would also like to make the point that with your Msc Fin from these European institutions you are eligible for an Analyst position, whereas the MBA degree is obviously for those making the move into Associate roles... difficult to compare the two.

I would say a lot comes down to what kind of background and work experience you already have when deciding which will be a better path for you as an individual...

are u sure on that? the MBF pay from st gallens looks very associate like, not analyst..

Nov 26, 2017

Everything in life is a risk. If you want it bad enough, you'll make it happen.

On a more practical note, talk to the career centre at the universities you intend on applying to and ask them who's recruiting at their schools and go from there.

Nov 26, 2017

Why GRE? All these school accept GMAT.

I'm applying to the same schools (St Gallen being my priority as well cause I love Swiss) except Imperial and WU next year. If your background is business/economics consider WHU as well, although their Masters isn't MSF.

Only issue when it comes to employment in EU is the language and since you mention you speak good German, I think you'll do well.

Nov 26, 2017

I'm at one of the schools you mentioned and did my undergrad in the US. Your GPA is probably the main hurdle you'll be facing as well as how many years of experience you already have. I have 3 years of experience and I keep having to explain in interviews why I didn't just go do an MBA (the real reason is 3 years of BO experience won't cut it at an M7).

Also, you shouldn't be taking the GRE if you want to do an Msc. in Finance. I took it before being sure what I wanted to do for grad school and got a 680V 800Q. But all those schools want the GMAT which is a different beast (I somehow ended up completely bombing the quant part, got 59%ile, and got a 720 thanks to my verbal).

I wouldn't put all your chips in one basket on this. I am the only native English speaker in my program of 150+ that is taught in English. I grew up in Europe and am a European citizen but it if weren't for that I would have felt very out of my place in my program. Finally, if your goal is S&T, it probably isn't worth it unless you get into LSE. It will be excessively hard to find a spot in S&T coming from any other school on that list because traders from continental Europe tend to have engineering/math backgrounds. But if IBD is your game, power to you. BB IB departments recruit hand over fist at LSE/Bocconi/ESADE/Saint-Gallen/HEC.

Nov 26, 2017

You might want to add Stockholm School of Economics to your list. I would rank SSE above Warwick, WU and maybe Bocconi. Furthermore, Stockholm is a damn nice city to live in and all the major banks recruit there as well.

Nov 26, 2017
above_and_beyond:

You might want to add Stockholm School of Economics to your list. I would rank SSE above Warwick, WU and maybe Bocconi. Furthermore, Stockholm is a damn nice city to live in and all the major banks recruit there as well.

Do you think it'd still be worth it if a non-EU like me has to pay 34k in tution fees? The fact that it's free for EU nationals puts me off

Nov 26, 2017
fours:
above_and_beyond:

You might want to add Stockholm School of Economics to your list. I would rank SSE above Warwick, WU and maybe Bocconi. Furthermore, Stockholm is a damn nice city to live in and all the major banks recruit there as well.

Do you think it'd still be worth it if a non-EU like me has to pay 34k in tution fees? The fact that it's free for EU nationals puts me off

Sorry, I didn't consider the fees for non-EU nationals. Although SSE might rank above those schools, I don't think it will be worth the tuition "premium". However, I guess your safest bet would be LSE and HEC (assuming you would get in, which will be difficult enough) for Finance. Warwick, WU and Bocconi are way behind those two.

Nov 26, 2017
above_and_beyond:

Sorry, I didn't consider the fees for non-EU nationals. Although SSE might rank above those schools, I don't think it will be worth the tuition "premium". However, I guess your safest bet would be LSE and HEC (assuming you would get in, which will be difficult enough) for Finance. Warwick, WU and Bocconi are way behind those two.

Bocconi is at least as good as HEC for IBD. But for any other department or stuff like consulting, marketing.. HEC is way ahead.

Nov 26, 2017
GoodBread:
above_and_beyond:

Sorry, I didn't consider the fees for non-EU nationals. Although SSE might rank above those schools, I don't think it will be worth the tuition "premium". However, I guess your safest bet would be LSE and HEC (assuming you would get in, which will be difficult enough) for Finance. Warwick, WU and Bocconi are way behind those two.

Bocconi is at least as good as HEC for IBD. But for any other department or stuff like consulting, marketing.. HEC is way ahead.

Bocconi undergrad, agreed.
Bocconi Master vs. HEC, don't think so..

Nov 26, 2017

Unlike the US, MBAs aren't as relevant in the job hunt. I can talk for Switzerland and France where having a Masters is almost crucial to getting into a top front-office job (e.g. Commodities Trading, MM M&A or AM). If you can get into either HEC or the LSE, you'll definitely get some interesting interviews.

Nov 26, 2017

Wow i didnt expect so much response on this. Yeah I think im just going to try to apply and see what I can make happen. My peers and mentors tell me that finding an international company with positions overseas would be a better route. Im just struggling immensely to find a job in the US right now to even get my foot in the door.

Nov 26, 2017

Probably depends on whether you're doing the "grande ecole" program at HEC or whatever the equivalent is for international students. For specialized masters, no way. The vast majority of people I know in Bocconi's Msc. Finance who focused on IBD summers got them (trading, not so much).

Nov 26, 2017

It has been said a lot but as a US citizen you will struggle to find internships/full-time opportunities in Europe as you will be competing with a lot of people not requiring any sponsorship.
I think that LBS/LSE/Oxbridge could be the exception to that rule but overall I have a lot of friends with no EU citizenship (sometimes with a US citizenship) that study at a EU target and are struggling.

Out of the schools you mentioned I think that HEC, ESADE and Imperial are your best bets though. For Netherlands I think that the main target is RSM though Maastricht is also known to be very good.

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Nov 26, 2017

All of what goldman said is very true. Also compound it with the fact that even if an employer will take you and sponsor you, they tend to try to screw you salary-wise (I can tell you from EXP that this is true) with the excuse of sponsoring you.
I have mentioned this program in other threads, but since you will have a MSc, look into the Blue Card program if you are in Continental Europe. Of your list, I would put them: HEC, IE, ESADE, Imperial and then I'm not sure. Realize that most people in the US will not know any of these schools in general so getting a job back here might be tough.

Nov 26, 2017

Hi,
as an MBA consultant, who has worked with these schools, I'd advise you to apply to ESSEC and Maastricht as the schools of your "comfort zone". Imperial informally requires higher GPA (min.3.6) and GMAT. HEC might not work for you due to low gmat score for April round. I'd also advise you to try
IESE
EDHEC
Manchester

Nov 26, 2017

Thanks for all of the advice and support.

As to goldman's comment about RSM I have spoken to their admissions team and was informed that my Biology undergrad major disqualifies me for the MSc Finance program. They want to see business or math.

The idea of getting paid less just because the employer knows that they have leverage in the situation is upsetting but understandable. Taking lower pay at an exceptional job in Europe could be a good long term investment. As GuyFawkes said brand recognition for even some of the top European MSc programs might be limited in the US but I would imagine that a FT role at a European office of JP Morgan or McKinsey would carry weight in the US.

Of the additional schools mentioned by mbastrategy I've already added EDHEC to my list. I've removed HEC and also added Grenoble. I'm completing the application process now for the following schools.

EDHEC
ESSEC
Grenoble
Maastricht
Imperial

Of the 4 applications already completed I've had responses from 3.

Tilburg stated I was ineligible due to my undergraduate background. I sent an email asking for clarification and to pursue eligibility in their Pre-masters program but have not heard back yet.

Frankfort School set up a Skype interview which I completed yesterday morning. It was a fairly standard 55 minute interview. It began with a 5 minute introduction in which I was to introduce myself. After that we broke away from the structured format and started talking about the features of the program, career outcomes and life in Frankfurt. Finally we returned to the structured format for questions about strengths and weaknesses, leadership, moral dilemmas and a few other standard questions. My interviewer told me that I would have a decision within two weeks.

ESADE set up an in person interview in SF before my application package was fully complete because the international recruiter was going to be in my area. That interview is on Monday.

I plan to follow up with IE to ensure that they have everything they need from me.

As always any feedback or advice is more than welcome.

Nov 26, 2017

Your experience is fine and I know for a fact it will be satisfactory for you to get into LSE, HEC, Bocconi or SSE (which are really the top 4 for MSc Finance). But of course it depends on many more things such as your internships for example.
And then of course it's all about your GMAT score after that.
I've been told by a course administrator at the LSE that the average gmat for the MSc Finance at LSE is 750, to give you an indication. However, I think that with anything above 720 you should be fine.
Just apply yourself in the applications and you should get into one of these 4.
They are all very well recognized in the City (London) and will get you all the right interviews. Good luck!

Nov 26, 2017

Recently when I have checked their admissions websites, they are saying that with the new revised GRE, one need not take the GMAT as well...Do I need to take both? Also I don't have any internships...I didnt realize this is what I wanted to do until late in College...I thought I wanted to be a Lawyer.

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