Cuisines of the World

Going Concern's picture
Rank: Human | banana points 12,290

Folks, a definitive ranking of the planet's major cuisines is desperately needed. I have my own list but the problem is it keeps changing. Below are the major cuisines of the world in no particular order, by country. What should the order be? Which are the best cuisines? Why?

By the way, if you really feel another country needs to be added to the list, feel free to make your case, but very good reasons will be needed. I'm not adding the UK because you think 'fish and chips' is a delicacy.

France
Italy
Greece
Spain
India
Mexico
Thailand
Turkey
Lebanon
Peru
Cuba
Japan
Korea
Vietnam
China
Morocco
Ethiopia
America

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Comments (92)

Mar 2, 2017

I was going to mock your addition of America to your list. But then I realized some of my favorite dining experiences are American. New England-style clam chowder, oyster bars, and Old Bay wings are all definitely delicacies I enjoy very much. And of course cheese burgers and fries.

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Mar 2, 2017

As much as I thought I would love this exercise, you just can't rank countries cuisines. It's not like picking the best steakhouse in NYC, each country has it's own unique ingredients and it would be very hard to make an empirical assessment of best to worst. Also several countries on the list have unique provinces and states with their own unique cooking flair. e.g. would America be rated as Southwest tacos or Louisiana Cajun, would China be rated under Szechuan or Cantonese, Mexican would that be Yucan(tamale) or Pacific(aka fish taco)?

Maybe you could rank, what's the best dish in each country, then put them up against each other?

Mar 2, 2017
C.R.E. Shervin:

As much as I thought I would love this exercise, you just can't rank countries cuisines. It's not like picking the best steakhouse in NYC, each country has it's own unique ingredients and it would be very hard to make an empirical assessment of best to worst. Also several countries on the list have unique provinces and states with their own unique cooking flair. e.g. would America be rated as Southwest tacos or Louisiana Cajun, would China be rated under Szechuan or Cantonese, Mexican would that be Yucan(tamale) or Pacific(aka fish taco)?

Disagree. That's like saying you can't 'rank' movies because they're in different genres, styles, etc. And yet they do it every year...it's called the Oscars

Just because something is really difficult to do doesn't mean it cannot or should not be done

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Mar 2, 2017

Cause the Oscars always gets it right ;)

I mean I want to try and make the list, but I've had so much "bomb" food from every one of these but Ethiopian that it would make it so subjective. Perhaps there are categories that I could rank each in and then come up with an overall ranking? Like presentation, umami, ingredients...?

Mar 2, 2017

Ehh, it's more akin to ranking athletes of different eras. Which really can't be done. Because every cuisine is influenced by others. For instance, tomato based curries are not native to India as tomatoes aren't indigenous to India and were brought over by the Portuguese. Also food and what is satisfying to me is so mood based or in the moment it's so hard to rank.

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Mar 3, 2017
Going Concern:

C.R.E. Shervin:As much as I thought I would love this exercise, you just can't rank countries cuisines. It's not like picking the best steakhouse in NYC, each country has it's own unique ingredients and it would be very hard to make an empirical assessment of best to worst. Also several countries on the list have unique provinces and states with their own unique cooking flair. e.g. would America be rated as Southwest tacos or Louisiana Cajun, would China be rated under Szechuan or Cantonese, Mexican would that be Yucan(tamale) or Pacific(aka fish taco)?

Disagree. That's like saying you can't 'rank' movies because they're in different genres, styles, etc. And yet they do it every year...it's called the Oscars

Just because something is really difficult to do doesn't mean it cannot or should not be done


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Just because something was done doesn't mean it means anything. Ranking art (movies, food) is pointless. All you've accomplished is a list of your preferences. Or a group consensus. Whatever.

Now saying, "What is the best sushi restaurant," for example, makes more sense. But still, what is the goal of eating food (outside of health and sustenance)? Pleasure. If the entire world says Lou Malnati's is the best pizza and I like Little Caesar's more, then I'm right in my world and you're right in yours.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Mar 3, 2017

Look up a "sonoran dog" from Tucson if you wanna talk southwest

Mar 2, 2017

Surprised Vietnamese didn't make the list. No love for pho or bahn mi, at the very least? It belongs somewhere between Thai and your "I couldn't decide how to separate these Asian cuisines" grouping of Japan/Korea/china.

American food at the bottom, huh? I guess if you think of American food as QSR, then fine. But I think of American food as capital-B Barbecue, which has developed some of the finest meat preparations around the globe. And the regional varieties! Go get a chopped pork sandwich in Atlanta, and brisket in Austin, and ribs in Kansas City, and pulled pork in Charlotte (with the western NC sauce, not the eastern NC vinegar-and-pepper-flakes "sauce"), and anything with a dry rub in Memphis, and then come tell me that American food is not world-class cuisine.

And to rank it beneath Ethiopian food is offensive. Ethiopian food tastes like soggy dirt, and I don't want it all over my hands. Never trust the cuisine of a country whose main export is starving.

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Mar 2, 2017
dmw86:

And to rank it beneath Ethiopian food is offensive. Ethiopian food tastes like soggy dirt, and I don't want it all over my hands. Never trust the cuisine of a country whose main export is starving.

To reiterate, my list is not in a particular order. It is not my ranking. That being said, as much as I love burgers, steak, barbeque ribs, wings, etc, when food critics think of 'American' food, they typically point to 'New American' which I'd describe as predominantly french fusion

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_American_cuisine

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Mar 2, 2017

That makes perfect sense and isn't as much fun. I see that you're setting this up to be a level-headed, rational discussion. That's not why I come to the internet; I come to the internet to see people respond with "F*** YOU I DON'T UNDERSTAND THE QUESTION BUT I LOVE GUY FIERI."

Jokes aside, what do you like to see in a cuisine? Is it complexity of flavors? Ingenuity? A wide variety of famous dishes, or a small group that are your favorites? I appreciate cuisines that combine taste and health-- I can eat clean Thai food every day (what's wrong with meat, rice, and vegetables?) but Italian food, while delicious, makes me feel like a snake that ate a deer.

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Mar 2, 2017

Agreed - I get the stereotype, but good American food is so much more than steak, fries, bbq. Need to also consider that some of the world's best restaurants fall under the American/comtemporary American umbrella (think EMP, Blue Hill, etc.).

Vietnamese should definitely be on there on the basis of Pho alone.

My rankings:
1. Chinese (could eat this for literally every meal, that's just how I was raised. Enjoy Szechuan food the most but can't say no to a good dim sum, soup dumpling, Peking duck, etc.)
2. American (see points above about fine dining - some of the best meals of my life. Popeye's is also a godsend)
3. Korea (soft tofu, kbbq, etc.)
4. Italy (not a huge pizza fan tbh)
5. Thailand
6. Japan (Really wish I liked sushi more, but I only really like the crab and shrimp variations)
7. Vietnamese
8. Peru (Pio Pio is great but NYC doesn't seem to have great variety for Peruvian)
9. Greece (mainly for the octopus. Gyros are meh)
10. Mexico
11. France
12. India
13. Turkey (also felt that the elements of Turkish food I liked were generally present in Greek. Love a fresh Turkish delight, though)
14. Spain
15. Ethiopia (wasn't a huge fan of my one experience. Never tried again afterwards)
16. Lebanon (never had)

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Mar 2, 2017
Going Concern:

<

blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd">

dmw86:

when food critics think of 'American' food, they typically point to 'New American' which I'd describe as predominantly french fusion

<

p><a href="https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_American_cuisine"

Though when you think about it, a lot of the best modern cuisines originated as fusions at some point. Mexican for example also has a lot of french elements (remember, cinco de mayo celebrates a victory against the French, not the Spanish, they had a lot of influence there), along with the Spanish and Indigenous roots of course. Then there's also Peru (Indigenous, Spanish, Japanese), Cuba (Afro-Caribbean, Chinese, Spanish), Cajun. Even before the Americas, a lot of ingredients and dishes in Europe can also trace their origins to trade through the Middle East and Asia, pasta from China to Italy probably being the most famous. America's might be developing still, but it's part of the same story.

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Mar 2, 2017
dmw86:

Never trust the cuisine of a country whose main export is starving.

As the old joke goes: Have you ever tried Ethiopian food? Neither have they.

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Mar 2, 2017

Greek food is overrated.

Mar 2, 2017

1) Italian - Could eat gnocchi/Chicken Parm/Pasta/Pizza etc all the time
2) Korean - Chimaek (Korean Fried Chicken & Beer), Soju, bibimbap, samgyeopsal and Kbbq
3) Indian - Nothing more satisfying than chiken vindaloo/tikka, saag paneer and some garlic naan
4) Mediterranean/Middle Eastern - Couldn't imagine a world without halal guys (53rd and 6th in NYC), Kebabs/Doner

Probably my top 4. Top Two are solidified after visiting Florence/Seoul & Busan respectively

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Mar 2, 2017

Real Italian pizza blows.

...

Mar 2, 2017

are you nuts

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Mar 2, 2017

Peruvian cuisine is very underrated, my second favorite latin american cuisine. hard to find in many cities (Seattle has only one spot that i know of and it wasn't that good), when it's authentic it's absolutely delicious. asian influence, lots of seafood, lots of spice and flavors, amazing ceviche, + add on a pisco sour to wash it down with. Also comes to mind is Andean stews you'll find in Cusco (near Machu Picchu)

If interested look up the Chef Gaston Acurio

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Mar 2, 2017
AndyLouis:

Peruvian cuisine is very underrated, my second favorite latin american cuisine. hard to find in many cities (Seattle has only one spot that i know of and it wasn't that good), when it's authentic it's absolutely delicious. asian influence, lots of seafood, lots of spice and flavors, amazing ceviche, + add on a pisco sour to wash it down with. Also comes to mind is Andean stews you'll find in Cusco (near Machu Picchu)

If interested look up the Chef Gaston Acurio

Fine fine, I'll give it to you. The list was a little light on the South American front, and to be fair, I do go to Pio Pio all the time in nyc. The food is pretty good in terms of flavors and taste though the menu is definitely on the smaller side

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Mar 2, 2017

+1 towards Peruvian food.

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Mar 2, 2017

haha, i mean it doesn't compare to many of the countries on your list, just saying it's very underrated and deserves more attention.

btw here's my very subjective ranking of latin american cuisine, separated in tiers. I know I'm forgetting some things any many would disagree, so don't give me a bunch of monkey shit :-)

TIER 1
-Mexico (no brainer here... ask me in a few months how much i'm loving the cuisine there)
-Brazil (amazing diversity, wonderful flavors, acai / fruit juice bars everywhere, incredible meat, churrascarias & rodizios ftw)
-Peru (see my comment above)
...... big drop off..........
TIER 2
-Argentina/Uruguay (ranking depends on how much you like red meat and red wine, otherwise options are VERY limited, Patagonia has some salmon, trout, and wild boar which is tasty)
-Venezuela (arepas all day, otherwise I can't really comment much here as I haven't been)
-Colombia (Bandeja Paisa, great meat, similar dishes to central america, otherwise felt like there was a lack of variety)
-Ecuador (can only comment on the seafood, best ceviche i've ever had)
-Costa Rica (my Costa Rican aunt makes a wonderful gallo pinto (rice/beans/egg scramble with spices & salsa Lizano and also Olla de Carne)
................
TIER 3
-Chile (at least they have good seafood, pisco and wine, but never ate well here otherwise)
-Nicaragua (very similar to CR (and the rest of central america from what i've heard, but very limited options, positives: great fresh fish and cheap rum)

................
NO OPINION:
Can't comment on: Carribean countries/Boliva/Belize/Honduras/Guatemala/Honduras/El Salvador, though I do love Cuban sandwiches

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Mar 2, 2017

I had a pretty good meal at La Mar (Gaston Acurio's venture at the Mandarin Oriental Miami). It was pretty good, but too pricey. Some of the best Peruvian I've had has been at some hole in the wall for dirt cheap. But I do agree with you Peruvian is underrated but its on its way up

Mar 2, 2017

Agree with all you said. buenos aires had a La Mar, delicious but very pricey

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Mar 2, 2017

Nigerian food is where it's at broski. A delicious pepper soup w/ goat meat will change your life

Mar 2, 2017

great thread GC. I'd have to rank Italian food #1 (my better half is italian), and then can't decide between indian, thai & mexican for #2.

curious on some recommendations for things to try from turkey & ethiopia, never had that. have had every other country on the list plus a few more. would definitely suggest Cuba be added.

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Mar 2, 2017

I'm from So-Cal, so I would lean towards Mexican.... something amazing about Tacos / burritos that I just can't get over.
I LOVE Indian and Thai; however, I do believe it is hard to find good Indian, and more common to find good thai.

I was in Istanbul for a few days and all I can really remember that was Turksih was doner? If that is even Turkish in nature.
Haven't had Ethiopian, but there is a place in my city and you eat with your hands.

...

Mar 3, 2017

Disclaimer: I'm not Turkish and have never been to Turkey. However, I frequent a couple of excellent restaurants manned by Turkish immigrants, and it's some of my favorite ethnic food.

For Turkish food: If you're not a big fan of lamb, you may not dig it. There's lots of crossover with Greek cuisine.

Kebabs are king in Turkish food. Doner Kebab (thinly sliced/shaved lamb) with cabbage, onion, and marinated olives is excellent. Lamb or beef casseroles (generally made in earthenware pots and called Guvec) and shish kebabs (lamb, beef, chicken, or made with a variety of different fish) are also on point. Tradititional lavash bread is a must with every meal. Pacanga Boregi (sausage filled pastries), falafel, and hummus are great appetizers.

Turkish desserts are pretty awesome. Baklava, turkish delight, and turkish rice pudding (called Sutlac) are all great.

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Mar 2, 2017

I don't know if I could rank by Region. I can definitely go by dish though. (not in any particular order)

France - Magret de canard is really tough to beat; that and some Foie I'll be in heaven.
Spain - If you haven't had jamon Iberico you owe it to yourself. It's amazing. Spain is slept on a little bit.
Italy - Veal ossobuco. I'm not a pasta fan. Also had really damn good octopus in Italy
China - Peking Duck holy crap I'll go back to Beijing just to have it again.

Had some killer Chilean seabass in Panama along with probably the best ceviche I've ever had.

Honestly, I could go on forever, but I'm going to get my ass chewed if I get caught food blogging on here.

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Mar 2, 2017

I second the jamon iberico..... Especially Barca's "Jamon Experience"

Mar 2, 2017

ossobuco with risotto alla milanese... without a doubt my choice for last meal

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Mar 2, 2017

Comfort:
1) Mexican
2) Italian
3) American

Health:
1) Japanese
2) Thai
3) Peru

Pure taste:
1) China
2) India
3) France

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Mar 2, 2017

I mean it's gotta be French, right? I get that it's a eurocentric list, but Paris alone has almost as many Michelin 3 star restaurants as all of the US. Even in the US, most of the 3-stars are French (TFL, Le Bernardin, Jean-Georges), and even chefs doing their own thing have classical French backgrounds (ie, Grant Achatz at TFL). It forms the base of most other European cuisines (not quite so much Italy, but certainly Spain).

From there you probably go to China, and although I don't know the food that well, it's a billion people and calling it "Chinese cuisine" does a disservice to the various regional differences.

Next would be Spain, perhaps my French bias is showing, but they do a better all-around job with seafood, and of course have their own regional specialties that in many cases are above the French.

I think Mexican deserves the next spot, but I'm kind of blending in the various other central American countries here.

Finally I'll let Italy in the door, because I think well done pizza is truly a gift to the world (even if the Yanks thought it up), but just can't get that excited about pasta as fine dining. Also the Spanish to better cured meats, and not just jamon iberico.

Approximate rest of list:
Vietnam/Thailand
Japan
Scandinavian
Greek
India

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Mar 2, 2017

I think I'm in the minority but I strongly disagree on French. Obviously personal preference but I find french far too rich, pretentious and over the top. I also think there is a significant Michelin bias towards French cuisine and French cooking techniques.

Otherwise, I'd strongly second your views on Spanish, Mexican (real Mexican, not just tacos and burritos) and Italian. I haven't had Scandinavian so I don't have views on that and I'd probably sub Korean for Japanese as I really enjoy the flavour profiles of Korean food.

Not to pick on your post in particular but it was last on the list and I generally agreed outside of the point on French food.

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Mar 2, 2017

No worries, there's no right answer. I would agree the classical French, in the sense of a Blanquette de Veau or Boeuf Bordelaise (not Bourginon, which is just basic ass beef stew) are now boring and uninspired dishes, but that much more interesting things are currently going on. They also have the best cheese.

Mar 2, 2017

I will question if you have ever had really fresh hand made pasta. There are a few places that do amazing pasta. One is in the place I currently am (west coast) other was the North End in Boston. (Granted I did pay like $36 bucks for the plate, so there is a highpossibility that I was associating price with taste)

...

Mar 2, 2017

One that hasn't been mentioned yet is Syrian food. It's the bomb. Every item explodes with flavour. It terrorizes your taste buds.

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Mar 2, 2017

Too soon.

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Mar 11, 2017

I agree with you on Syrian food.

Wanted to add that Mexican food is extremely underrated. We Americans think Mexican food is Guac and tacos... it's not. Think pork, Civiche, braised lamb, etc... they have so many cooked dishes and meals that never make it into American culture because they aren't headline dishes (I'm guessing this is the case for many countries, but for Mexico I think this really stands out).

.

Mar 2, 2017

Korea
Japan
China

in that order.

Mar 2, 2017

you must be asian... its ok id rank it in that order too (except maybe Italy somewhere in between there)

Mar 2, 2017

Italian
French
Mexican
American
Middle Eastern
Thai
Vietnamese
Chinese

I am hungry now so that is the list of what seems of what would be the most appetizing.

Mar 2, 2017

FUCK YOU I DON'T UNDERSTAND THE QUESTION BUT I LOVE GUY FIERI

Mar 2, 2017

FINALLY, THANK YOU

Mar 2, 2017

Hijacking this thread kind of.... anyone have any awesome recommendations for dining in Vegas? I've eaten at a bunch of places, but if there are any new restaurants worth going to, let me know :) Open to anything.

...

Mar 2, 2017

It was a few years ago, but a guy knew in college who worked out there recommended a bunch of off the strip places. Most of them were in Hendersonville. All good/cool places and cheaper than the strip, but you have to drive 10 min.

Of course I dont remember any of the names

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Mar 2, 2017

Didn't make it when I went but I have heard Lotus of Siam is top notch for Thai food and not quite the shakedown of a lot of other places in Vegas.

Mar 2, 2017

breakfast tacos

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Mar 2, 2017

I may be a total Rube, but the 1 cuisine I could not live without is Mexican. My god do I love Mexican.

I agree with one of the posters above in that I personally find French overrated. I understand that many chefs are french-inspired, but straight up French doesnt do a lot for me. The single worst thing I've ever tried was in an upscale french restaurant one of the courses was a Lobster cappuccino. It was literally inedible. Even the items I liked were just good, not great.

I've been on a greek kick lately (but not gyros).

Andy mentioned not rating Belize. I will say I spent 7 days there and didnt have a bad meal. In the tourist areas it was american-ish, but good. In the mainland I just stopped random times on the side of the road and it was nothing fancy - stewed chicken, beans and rice, but the spice/flavor worked well for me. There probably are nicer places in Belize City, but I was out in the country when on the mainland.

I like Chinese, the problem is that in China most places have such shitty quality meat. I definitely go for a Peking duck meal every time I'm there, which is great. The other thing that deserves mentioning is Hot Pot, if you can handle the spice, hot pot is the shit. Other than Peking Duck and Hot Pot, I like the flavors, but not the quality of the other things I've tried while in China.

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Best Response
Mar 2, 2017

I'm taking a crack at this after my previous comment. I have given it some thought and I will look at cuisine not inspired by simply cooked fresh ingredients. e.g. a steak. I don't care how organic/grass fed, well marbled this steak would be very little has to be done to it(all you need is salt and pepper) and you have yourself a delicious meal. Now I love steak but a country's cuisine should be marked by more than a fresh piece of fish or meat. I added this part after I wrote the below: man it gets really hard to talk about 12 different cuisines and not reuse the words, spice, flavor, cooking.

France - By far the best cuisine. Not only do they have the most decadent of foods but their influence stretches across the globe. Everything they cook is extremely complicated and takes years to master the cuisine properly. American, Vietnamese, Carribean and Haitian all owe France for inspiration for many of their dishes and what would become their local cuisine.

America - The most versatile because we are a country of immigrants and that is reflected by what we cook. We have our own versions of Italian food some of which is far superior to many regions in Italy. We have Louisiana gulf cooking which is by far some of the best food on earth. There is a reason I go to New Orleans, and it's not Bourbon Street.

Indian - Everything that is Indian is so flavorful, they would never have something as ordinary as a hamburger on any of their menus. From their naan to vindalo or tikka and daal everything they make has such a strong flavor and it is because of the number of spices they cook with.

Chinese - Pretty much everything that can be said for Indian food can be said for Chinese food. Not only do their dishes vary by regions but it is absolutely flavor packed in everything you order. My personal favorite is sichuan, with all the garlic, and peppers it has an unmistakable bold flavor profile.

Mexican - One of my personal favorites. Each distinct region has its own powerhouse flavor profile. If you have ever been to Cabo and gone to Guacamayas then you have eaten the best tacos on earth. I also love yucutan province's cuisine as well, more tamales and earthy ingredients that still do not lack a rich complexity of spice.

Italy - Pasta, nuff said. But I'm knocking it down some because the tomato didn't originate in italy and it's in virtually in every dish.(edit) Almost every dish is a variation of red sauce and cheese and a noddle shape.

Spain - Tapas and home of the manzinilla olive. Not to mention Jambon Iberico or the hamoncilla.

Turkey - Very similar to Greek food but more meat and the more spices. Could eat all day.
Greece - Again relies on a lot of fresh ingredients if you are by the coast. Feta is goat piss, but the lamb w0w

Korea - Getting lazy and grouping the below 3 together with Korean at the top.
Vietnam
Thailand

Japan - Of the three predominant areas of cooking, sushi, teriyaki and yakatori all three are made what they are by quality ingredients. While I fully appreciate the art that goes into sushi it is still a cuisine that is based on super fresh ingredients, although that was not always the case if you look at its origin.

Cuba - Actual Cuban food is atrocious, but here in the states Cuban inspired food is really good.

Peru - Any country that eats Guinea Pig as a staple can't be ranked very high. I don't care how good Pio Pio's green sauce is.

Ethiopia - Never had
Lebanon - Never had

Also- All central american food is pretty much the same. So is South American food with some subtle differences. Not to discount it cause Venezuela has amazing arepas and Colombia has amazing empanadas and Ajiaco(maybe the one of the best soups in the world)

Mar 2, 2017
C.R.E. Shervin:

Peru - Any country that eats Guinea Pig as a staple can't be ranked very high. I don't care how good Pio Pio's green sauce is.

That green sauce is seriously AMAZING. Addictive like crack

Nice writeup. Your point about discounting cuisines/dishes that are simply cooked fresh ingredients is well taken

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Mar 2, 2017

wish I could give you all my SBs, great write up.

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Mar 11, 2017

here is a recommendation for Lebanese food in NYC: "ilili" and/or Almayass.
I take my gf to ilili, but take clients to dinners to Almayass... you will be blown away.

Ilili is Lebanese contemporary with American influences.
Almayass is Lebanese Armenian, it is a higher scale resto compared to ilili.

.

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Mar 2, 2017

Too bad no one has mentioned Russian food, though it's understandable because it's hard to find. Historically, Russian food has been pretty simple (though still damn delicious) and only recently, since the turn of the century, has it become more inventive with its flavors.

As far as other cuisines go, I see Italian and French food as the pinnacle of world cuisine when they are at their best. The French and Italians have done more to advance culinary arts than anyone else except for maybe the Japanese. The problem is that there are a TON of crappy of Italian and French restaurants, both in the states and in those respective countries. Paris and Rome are filled with tourist trap spots that serve microwave-heated pasta, previously frozen pizza, and "fast-casual" French food (which is an oxymoron, as you need some time to prepare great French dishes.)

It's because of this that I say Indian and Southeastern Asian cuisines are the best in the world overall. They're consistently excellent and use incredible flavors. The best Indian, Thai, and Vietnamese food isn't as good as the best Italian and French food, but you're more likely to enjoy food you buy from a street vendor in Delhi or Bangkok than the food you'd get by going to a random French or Italian cafe.

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Mar 3, 2017
Gangster Putin:

Too bad no one has mentioned Russian food, though it's understandable because it's hard to find. Historically, Russian food has been pretty simple (though still damn delicious) and only recently, since the turn of the century, has it become more inventive with its flavors.

Ukrainian food is better.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Mar 3, 2017

LOVE North Mexican food/TexMex. Could eat it literally everyday.
Like South Mexican, especially queso fundido. I'm not a big corn tortilla guy but I find Southern Mexican a lot more clean than Northern so I can get over it.
Really like Indian food, chicken tikka masala, lamb korma are my go-tos. Oddly enough, had a really great meal at a little place in a strip mall in SLC. It was shocking how good it was.
One that no one has mentioned is Yemeni food. It's got of spice to it and shares a lot of similarities with Latin American cuisine. There isn't much here in the States that I know of but I had a lot of it when I was in the Middle East and it's pretty fantastic.

Mar 3, 2017

I could go on forever about food, but will hold back.

If you guys like Pio Pio, try Llama Inn in Williamsburg. Bit pricier, but excellent food.

Mar 4, 2017

I wonder why the fuck you guys forgot MOROCCAN CUISINE, top class. I lived there for years and I was always eating quality, definitely Top 3 in the world.

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Mar 2, 2017

Almost added it in the rankings.

Mar 4, 2017

Malaysian and Burmese food
Also Carribean

Mar 4, 2017
  1. France
  2. France
  3. France
  4. France
  5. France
  6. France
  7. France
    ...
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Mar 5, 2017

Probably the Japanese, French and Italian cuisines, which is reflected in the Michelin rankings. Kitchens such as Mexico, India, Ethiopia, Turkey, China etc, can't begin to compete with them culinary. The Mexican kitchen is overrated, just an excess of fat to increase flavors.

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Mar 2, 2017
Aintnobodygottimeforthat:

Kitchens such as Mexico, India, Ethiopia, Turkey, China etc, can't begin to compete with them culinary.

Curious to hear your defense of this. I know you're short on time, but if you could expand further...

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Mar 5, 2017

Well, besides this being a highly personal opinion, I feel like most of those countries are too poor to have developed their own unique cuisine. The type of high-end cooking required to compete is an extreme luxury and really only affordable in the west and a few other industrialized nations.

If you're only looking for a typical bang for buck-type of food that's an entirely different story.

Mar 5, 2017

My choices: Japanese, Chinese, Italian and French. :)

But I have tried Korean Cuisine and this will definitely become a favorite if I get to be more exposed with it. Loved the Kimchi!

Sugarybliss

Mar 6, 2017

It sounds really interesting and appetising to know about the cuisines list.

Mar 2, 2017

Don't have much to add as people here have done great with covering the different regions but anyone bringing up Michelin rankings to justify the quality of a particular region over another is ridiculous. Native cuisine is not determined by some prestigious award. The most authentic food you'll have are usually mom-and-pop hole in the wall spots that will never get a Michelin star and are superior to many of those over-priced restaurants. Not to mention Michelin clearly is biased towards French food and clearly is biased towards developed nations (that have the consumer demand to open a restaurant that runs at $200+ a meal). I also put a premium on regions that can give you an outstanding experience for $5 or $50, French cuisine is almost always at the higher end. Just my two cents.

Personally, BBQ is my favorite (other than my native food) followed by Thai/ Chinese followed by Mexican/ Tex-Mex. This is probably more a reflection of where I live though.

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Mar 2, 2017
BobTheBaker:

anyone bringing up Michelin rankings to justify the quality of a particular region over another is ridiculous. Native cuisine is not determined by some prestigious award. The most authentic food you'll have are usually mom-and-pop hole in the wall spots that will never get a Michelin star and are superior to many of those over-priced restaurants.

I'll agree with you here. The Michelin ranking seems to emphasize factors that I just don't care much about, like presentation for instance. Most of my favorite restaurants in NYC aren't ranked by Michelin...tend not to rely too much on tire companies for food recs

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Mar 8, 2017

Mandalay in San Fran. Mix of Chinese, Thai, and Indian. Esp. great if you love spicy.

ductusexemplo

Mar 9, 2017

France
Italian
Greek
Turkish
Moroccan
Indian

Mar 10, 2017

I'm Italian, we are kinda of nazis when it comes to cusine... I get that "de gustibus non disputandum est", but I see a lot of incompetence when it comes to talk about food among americans, no offence... just my experience through what I can see on r/food.

nuff said.

1- japanese, i love raw seafood, i love sashimi, chiarashi and various tartare, though sushi is just fine to me
2- italian, obviously, our grandmother are too fucking skilled to compete
3? no fucking clue... i don't want to pretend that i know a lot of cusines outside my domain of expertise... I can tell you that italian cuisine in italy and japanese cusine in italy or japan are executed differently than in the US.

Probably france is decent, just considering the number of michelin starred restaurant, and chef's table, though, I repeat myself, I haven't tried anything too heavy on this (well, apart from fusion/ nuovelle cuisine in fancy michelin restaurant, though I wouldn't call them "french" ), AND I'm not a big fan of desserts, which I get French cuisine is heavy on it, and/or cheeses

For example, if you served Starbucks or domino's in italy they'd fucking spit it right in front of your face...
or: "'Let Italians cook pasta, please': French version of carbonara using boiled bacon, creme fraiche and a RAW egg leaves the internet appalled"
it's kinda like me coming to you and telling how to make a bbq or an hamburger... I'm not going to do that... while I can see people pretending that they know how to do our stuff better than us...

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Mar 2, 2017

I read this in the voice of "The Situation" from "The Jersey Shore"

eh, oh fugadaboudit

Mar 11, 2017

Beef Noodle Soup - China

Mar 11, 2017

Intestines and Blood Pudding - Sichuan, China

pudding

Sichuan style Boiled Fish - Sichuan, China

water boiled fish

Mar 11, 2017

Ramen
Ramen - Japan

thai curry
Chicken Curry - Thailand

adobo
Chicken Adobo - Philippines

curry nan
Curry and Naan - India

Pho
Pho - Vietnam

Mar 14, 2017

My top cuisines in order:
1. Korean - Bulgogi, Japchae, Kimchi, Korean Barbeque, Soft Tofu Stew, Dolsot Bibimbap
2. Italian - Spaghetti pasta, pizza, bruschetta
3. Vietnamese - spring rolls, seaweed rolls, Goi cuon, Mi Quang
4. Mexican - beef tacos, slow cooker chicken tortilla soup, nachos supreme, quesadillas, enchiladas
5. Indian - samosa, masala dosa, maili kofta

Mar 14, 2017

Greece: Biased, I'm Greek
Japan: Sushi
Italy: Real, practical food
India: Love spicy food
America: Peter Luger, Katz's