Does Glassdoor Throw Anyone Else Off Their Interview Game?

ASC_842's picture
Rank: Gorilla | 532

Got an interview. Went to look at questions on glassdoor. I see the company has an average rating of 1.7 stars.

Reviews have the following consistent comments: cliquey, low pay, unprofessional, lack of training.

These reviews made me feel-off even though I am super excited for the shot to break into the industry. The "lack of training" comment worries me. Its going to stay in my mind during the interview.

Anyone else get this with super negative of super positive reviews?

Comments (11)

Feb 6, 2019

It is useless to think about it before your interview. The feeling you will get during the interview is much more important than the reviews. My company has absolutely shit reviews but my job, pay and team are really great because reviews were posted by support and tech people (which do have shit pay and shit management and shit work in my company) and analysts who got fired (high turnover in a hedge fund). So trust your gut feeling when meeting with the people you will have to work with if you get the job and not only the reviews.

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Feb 6, 2019

The negative ones I've read tend to come from support staff. Theres also a lot of assholes in real estate that just rub people the wrong way

Also worth noting that people who have had a terrible experience are the most likely type of person to write a review.

Feb 21, 2019

This sounds like wishful thinking to me.

Most of the biases cut the other way actually. Most people write reviews on Company A because they really want to read about Company B, and you need to write a review or post a salary to get access. So people who don't hate their current/previous employer just quickly write a decent review so they can move forward with Glassdoor.

Also, as other commenters have said, many shitty companies respond by urging their employees to post positive reviews.

My former company is a 3.5, and that place was a nightmare. A 1.7 is god awful.

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Feb 6, 2019
ASC_842:

Anyone else get this with super negative of super positive reviews?

Dealing with it right now. Applying for a company that is absolutely trashed on Glassdoor. Worse - many of the reviews also mention that the positive reviews are forced by management and are utter bullshit.

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Feb 6, 2019

LOL . I read one of those a few weeks ago.

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Feb 21, 2019

It is becoming more common for employers to "suggest" the employees leave positive glassdoor reviews.

My take - having been on both sides is to only look at relevant feedback - same location and same/similar position. Then read it and be aware, but do your own diligence. So items like pay and even training wouldnt alarm me because I wont go to the company without a fair comp package and I'm at the point where I don't need much training. For me, culture and performace would be items I'd watch out for.

Even for items that would be key for me, I'd only let that feedback make me aware of a potential issue. I'd then try to get a feel for it myself and do any diligence I could on my own

twitter: @CorpFin_Guy

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Feb 21, 2019

It depends on the size of the company as well, if it's a larger firm you're very likely to have very different cultures from one manager/team/division to the next.
I just looked my bank up and the most common positive is good work-life balance, the most common negative is bad work-life balance, so that's very helpful to applicants.

Feb 21, 2019

Take it as a sign that the company has a weaker position and needs employees. More power for you.

FYI, the place is probably worse than the reviews suggest. What happens is, companies get bad reviews and then they respond by urging employees to post positive ones (as other commenters above suggest). But to exacerbate that further, the toxic places that get bad reviews are also the toxic places where sucking up to management (by doing things like posting positive reviews) is a way to get ahead. Vicious cycle.

Doesn't mean don't work there. You're trying to break in. Just saying, it's probably a shitty place and hopefully that at least means you can get the job. Once you do, start plotting your exit.

Feb 21, 2019

This uncertainty can be mitigated by networking and talking to people who work at the firm to get their take.

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Feb 21, 2019

Glassdoor is where you go if you want to either

1- completely psyche yourself out before an interview

2- prepare for the wrong questions (your recruiter should tell you exactly what they will ask. If not, its either a fake company or you're an idiot)

3- low-ball/misunderstand your compensation (ask someone IRL or take what they give you and get more later. It all works out.)

Satisfied, successful people simply don't post on the internet as much as unhappy, anxious people. Just stay the fuck away from Glassdoor. And WSO, too, for that matter.

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Feb 25, 2019
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