Giving to charity instead of gifts

HFT's picture
Rank: Orangutan | banana points 371

I would like some thoughts on giving to the charity of other people's choice this holiday instead of giving the gift and the benefits of forgoing material gifts for charity.

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Comments (25)

Dec 22, 2018

If they specifically ask for that, then go for it, but I think a Starbucks giftcard is good for most people.

Dec 22, 2018

I mean in dollar terms it maybe a small gift like a $50 gift card, but for a developing country the same in a donation to a legit charity it can make a difference, a very significant difference.

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Dec 25, 2018

Whenever I read charity related stuff it always seems to be a developing country for some reason? Do people have No interest in donating to homeless veterans and kids etc in America?

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Dec 25, 2018

it's just an example that every dollar counts when giving for the right causes, US or overseas, you can choose whatever you want, just the doing good that counts.

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Dec 26, 2018

thats fair enough. but ill be honest. the vast majority of schools, unis, organizations ive seen supporting charities - its always some seemingly BS virtue signalling "lets build a well in africa" kind of thing.....when there are literally millions of people back home who also need help....it just always seems to me that people dont find those as "sexy a cause" to virtue signal about. also not pointing this at you specifically at all, just musing in general.

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Dec 26, 2018

Got it! You can individually vote with your wallet, Very important to vote with the wallet, both buying ethically made goods(wherever possible) and giving to genuine charities.

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Jan 2, 2019

I think it has something to do with the fact that tax dollars support the domestic needy population, and moreover, that the US has the fiscal and governmental capability to try and fix some of these things, if there is political will for it.

Not to mention, not having access to potable water is a major health and life quality issue for millions of people in developing countries that even homeless folks in the US don't have. I'm not claiming the at-risk population in the US has some glamorous life compared to those in other nations and thus don't deserve the money and attention - but there is SOME access to basic goods and services here that don't exist elsewhere.

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Dec 22, 2018

Never gave to charity. If you believe in really helping someone in need go do it personally not through some shady Church or Foundation.

Incoming MS from clueless trust fund babies.

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Dec 24, 2018
Tony Montana:

Never gave to charity. If you believe in really helping someone in need go do it personally not through some shady Church or Foundation.

So you never gave to charity, fine. Have you ever helped anyone financially "personally" or is that theoretical too?

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Dec 25, 2018

Yes, I have. Have you? Trust fund recieval doesn't count :)

Dec 25, 2018
Tony Montana:

Yes, I have. Have you? Trust fund recieval doesn't count :)

First of all, that's good to hear (seriously). On a career building note, make sure to somehow mention it at interviews cause there are a lot of people like myself who made enough money and now are into touchy-feely/warm-n-fuzzy stuff.

Second, your preoccupation with trust funds is a bit annoying. I am certainly not a trust fund kid myself nor do I have any kids to leave a trust fund for. At least I am not aware of any kids :)

Now that we are done with obligatory penis fencing. Depending on the year and some other factors, I aim to donate from 25 to 45% of my annual income (I have my personal reasons for doing so, I know it's a bit silly). It spans both registered charities/foundations and smaller private causes (all the way down to single individuals), so I have some thoughts on the topic

  • I like the idea of someone donating money, in my name or otherwise, instead of gifting me more crap. I have enough crap as is and I can afford my own crap if I need to replace anything. Besides, I have never gotten a gift that I truly wanted (not counting an occasional blow job for birthday).
  • personal connection is the best way to ensure transparency, but you will have pretty low impact (a.k.a. bang per buck) unless you know a lot of people across the social strata. I do not and my personal results have been mixed.
  • personally, having seen all sorts of causes, I find that you get biggest impact by deploying money overseas, even adjusted for some administrative overhead. Picking the right organization and doing some proper DD is essential.
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Dec 25, 2018
Mostly Random Dude:
Tony Montana:

Yes, I have. Have you? Trust fund recieval doesn't count :)

On a career building note, make sure to somehow mention it at interviews

Seems like a good way to get laughed at, I'm going off a hunch that most people in the industry were from really good backgrounds and had most handed down to them from a young age.

Mostly Random Dude:

Now that we are done with obligatory penis fencing. Depending on the year and some other factors, I aim to donate from 25 to 45% of my annual income (I have my personal reasons for doing so, I know it's a bit silly). It spans both registered charities/foundations and smaller private causes (all the way down to single individuals), so I have some thoughts on the topic

Damn, kudos to you. I personally could never imagine myself giving away so much of my income (looking forward here obviously) considering I had nothing handed down to me and had to earn whatever I wanted. Hopefully my viewpoint changes, definitely don't run around saying this kind of stuff in public because I would be labeled as a sociopath unless this viewpoint was expressed around those who worked hard for what they achieved ;)

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Dec 25, 2018
Tony Montana:

Seems like a good way to get laughed at, I'm going off a hunch that most people in the industry were from really good backgrounds and had most handed down to them from a young age.

I would think mentioning that you are into helping people (and giving some examples) has an asymmetric payoff. If the person on the other side of the table is into that stuff him/herself (and you'd be surprised how many people in finance are), he will say "awesome, we have something in common" while if he's not he's not gonna hold it against you.

It seems like you are not coming from a common background for this business, so you never know what might help. For example, I got my first job in part because I like classical music.

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Funniest
Dec 22, 2018

Make sure to donate to the Human Fund.

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Dec 22, 2018
JonnyDrama:

Make sure to donate to the Human Fund.

You absolute bastard! You beat me to it!

Dec 24, 2018
JonnyDrama:

Make sure to donate to the Human Fund.

"It has a certain understated stupidity. "

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Dec 24, 2018

I thought this was the whole point of this thread! Happy Festivus

Most Helpful
Dec 24, 2018

I'm all for gifts to charity. I can't remember the last time I received something I needed or wanted for Christmas. As an example, I just opened a gift with sweaters in it. I own at least 50 sweaters. There is no single item of clothing I need or want less. I don't even believe in Christmas and specifically told people not to buy me gifts. You know why? Because I'm not good at faking it when I am perplexed or disappointed, so if I have to thank you afterwards for some shitty gift I didn't want, then it's going to be awkward for both of us.

My position on this matter is well known among the people who might be inclined to give me a gift. My parents, for instance, know with certainty that I have shitloads of sweaters. I couldn't possibly need another sweater. And even if I could use one, I would only want it if it was nice. You want to buy me a Loro Piana sweater? Fine--I'll donate one of my old ones to charity. But if you want to buy me something shittier than anything I already possess--please, God, donate the money instead.

Otherwise, I have to return the shitty thing you bought. I have neither the time nor the inclination to do so. That's part of the reason I have so many fucking sweaters in the first place. I never get around to returning them, and I sure as shit don't wear them all. And if you buy them from a store where I wouldn't shop, then the act of returning your gifts grants me store credit at a place I wouldn't shop. It's just a complete waste of money.

If you know any grumpy cunts like me who have too much shit already and enough money to buy precisely what they want, either put the effort in to find something unique or just donate the money to charity.

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Dec 24, 2018

I just finished the Christmas dinner with the family and my parents + grandparents got charity gifts. They already have everything, and instead of getting them some crap they don't need I'll donate some money to a charity run by a friend of mine. It's also pretty convenient instead of walking around during December to figure out what to get for all of them.

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Dec 25, 2018

Great initiative. Thanks for contributing to a charitable cause. The joy of giving.

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Dec 25, 2018

Is there a charity that gives non targets summer internships?

excel is my canvas, and data is my paint - new york - brunch conesseiour - atheist - centrist - ENFP - TCU alum

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Dec 25, 2018

I give to charity.

I don't do it as a gift on someone else's behalf. That's just nonsense. If the recipient doesn't want a gift because he has "too much crap already" then buy him a few beers or a dinner or whatever. But to donate to a cause and act like it's "his" donation is just silly to me.

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Dec 26, 2018

If you want to give to charity then do so on your own behalf. If you want to give someone a gift then give them a gift. If you know a charity they already support than that could be a suitable gift. Ultimately, think about what the person wants.

Dec 26, 2018
Jan 2, 2019
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