Goldman Sachs Recruiters Coming to My Non-Target

mcsun1234's picture
Rank: Monkey | 39

Goldman Sachs is coming to my small non-target state school in CA and its the first time ever that they are coming over here. Trust me, I'm shocked. The agenda says they are just going to talk about summer internships and jobs, but I was wondering if this where I try and stand out. I'm going to have a bunch of other students in that room thinking the same, what should I do to stand out to the recruiters?

I know it's a lame question but it's going to be my first time in one of these things. Any tips or advice to make myself standout would be great.

Yours.

Comments (15)

Best Response
Nov 16, 2016

Ask good questions and don't foam at the mouth about IBD</span I'd say to be cognizant of what the recruiters are looking for. Likely, they aren't the recruiters for IBD in NY and are probably looking for Ops, audit, etc. in a regional office. You can check on the My GS Events portal and it will say what divisions. There is nothing wrong with those roles but just know ahead that they probably aren't looking at your school to send hirevue invites for IBD.

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Nov 17, 2016

I agree with BillBelichick37, asking good questions is definitely a good way to show them that you know what you're talking about. People are going to ask the normal broad questions that have nothing related to the actual work they do. Sit in the front, maintain a good eye contact with the recruiters throughout the session, and try to have a soft smile on your face and not one that screams "When will this end?!?!" Some students are going to this that the more they ask, the more they will notice, but I believe it's more of the quality of the questions that matter than quantity. Definitely going up to them at the end and getting their business card to follow up is great. Ask them when you reach out again whether or not there's an analyst/associate in your interested role whom they can connect your with.

TL;DR: Ask quality questions (not basic, let the others ask those), network with them after, get business cards, ask to be connected with an analyst who can talk more about their role.

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Nov 20, 2016

??

    • 6
Nov 17, 2016

This is all good advice, but I should note that most bankers will forget about you at info sessions. Your goal is to get them into a one-on-one conversation on the phone and then later in person (if possible).

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Nov 18, 2016

How to stand out? Keep your phone in your pocket and don't check Snapchat.

You killed the Greece spread goes up, spread goes down, from Wall Street they all play like a freak, Goldman Sachs 'o beat.

    • 1
Nov 18, 2016

I can almost guarantee it will be for Salt Lake City for Operations, CRM&A, or most likely, the Controllers division. There won't be a real way to stand out in a full room with everyone mouthbreathing to get facetime. It is possible, but not likely, that the $GS rep will be from Los Angeles because prominent CSUN alumni in the area. Perhaps a good "in" is to just introduce yourself, have ready "Why Goldman?" in your 10 second introduction, and request a business card. Then you have that name for your 300-word application statement and future video / phone interview.

Nov 18, 2016

Hence why it's important to ask a really good question. I asked a banker a good question during an event and he went on a 3 minute tangent about it and really liked that I took the time to ask something other than "What is the culture?"

Nov 19, 2016

Depending on the event, and using your best judgement, you can arrive about 5-10 minutes early to get a seat and make casual chitchat with them. Maybe ask if this is the first time, or mention that this is the first you've seen them on campus- say thanks etc.

Depending on the event, and using your best judgement determine the dress code. If you don't know check the event site or just ask. For example, at casual events wearing a full suit and tie would make you look like a tool.

Beli, posted GS info below: biz casual and jacket.

Know what they are recruiting for, and if you're interested in those areas express your interest. Don't act like a know it all or try to dominate the conversation.

How is my grammar? Drop me a note with any errors you see!

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    • 1
Nov 18, 2016

jacket, shirt, no tie is generally GS code

PS: You'd be surprised how many people fuck this up and wear jeans or even a t shirt.

    • 1
Nov 19, 2016

A bit of awareness goes a long way.
I once was under-dressed, intentionally, relative to my peers when an associate came in one evening for a presentation. It singled me out in a good way and we chatted after the presentation. The other guys in suits approached him too but he wasn't as receptive to them.

Same applies for the way you handle yourself ie. ask thoughtful questions, but don't fire away random questions because you are trying to impress someone.

How is my grammar? Drop me a note with any errors you see!

Nov 18, 2016

GS has a program now for IBD in SLC which is mostly for non-target kids. I'm not sure about if there is a summer program there, but the full-time program is 18 months working in an IBD group (staffer is the same one for the group in NYC) and after the 18 months, if you perform well, you're given the opportunity to move to NYC as a 1st year analyst that is 6 months in (so essentially only losing a year). If that would be of interest I would ask about that program as I think it could be more likely than starting in NYC

Nov 18, 2016

It is NOT a non-target kids only program. Most the people come from BYU or MSF programs that I've noticed but I have not seen any interns in that group yet.

Nov 18, 2016
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