What is the expected all-in compensation (Base+Bonus) for a Hedge Fund Analyst with 2 years of banking + 2 years of private equity experience?

I checked the WSO Hedge Fund Report and believe those data points are for analysts coming straight out of banking.

Comments (8)


Depends on fund, but guesstimate ~300

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Got it that's helpful. Thanks.

The reason I ask is as I'm thinking through next steps if PE associates get $250-$300K for a middle-market PE firm (not mega fund) then moving over to a hedge fund after 2 years of investment banking and 2 years of private equity, the compensation is ~$300K? I guess I would expect somewhere in the $400K-$500K range depending on the fund (senior analyst/experienced type role)


On one hand, it seems reasonable to expect comp to be in line with or better than your current (2 years banking, 2 years private equity)... but wouldn't it depend on whether the new fund actually considers you "experienced"? Correct me if I'm wrong, but 4 years of non-HF experience may still be considered on par with 2 years of non-HF experience? So the 400 range might be more applicable going from banking to private equity to an activist fund, but probably not the right number for someone going from banking to private equity to a macro fund. in that case then the 300 number probably makes more sense?


If you knew how hedge funds worked you would know this question is like asking "how much can an entrepreneur expect to make".

The answer is anywhere from 0% of base to 300% of base. Different funds have different base salaries.

So $100k to $750k.


100k to 750k is a correct number


I know a guy with 2 yrs. IB and 2 yrs. MF PE experience that moved to a top HF, and actually getting up taking a mild pay cut. Went from ~$325k to to the ~$300k area. This was last year, where HFs in general performed well.

HFs are less structured, so the pay is highly variable and depends on how generous or stingy (in most cases) your PM is. There isn't a 1st yr. / 2nd yr. / 3rd yr. Associate, VP etc. structure where there are more-or-less established street comp levels.


Second this. Also I might just SB every post you make going forward b/c of your avatar


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