Highest Comp for Bachelor’s / Post MBA

CPAtoMBA's picture
Rank: Orangutan | 333

Topic says it all, what is the highest comp you've heard someone make in their first job post-college / post-MBA? What job and which company was it?

Also, which colleges and what majors would you advice your future kids to pursue for highest ROI / best comp?

Comments (8)

Mar 15, 2019

You want to word the question a bit differently, as there's a whole bunch of CEO's that fit the "post-MBA" criteria.

Mar 15, 2019

Noted and edited the post. Thanks.

Mar 15, 2019

If my kids asked this question I would be deeply disappointed. Comp is not the correct goal, and if it is, you're in trouble. Highest initial comp is probably in tech, but if my kid didn't have a passion for tech, they shouldn't pursue it. Just be yourself and work hard toward your passion or interests and you'll be successful over the long run.

That being said, best "ROI" is probably an excellent state school CS program with low tuition -> top tech firm or quant HF. Or even deeper, drop out of college and start a successful company, if we're not accounting for risk.

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Mar 15, 2019

Well, that's right in general. But there are some college kids who also think that studying gender studies, religion, some sort of arts (aka pursuing their passion) from a small college will make them happy. And then they work in fast food after graduation because they can't find any jobs.

Parents play a major role in the development of their children and their guidance is essential to make sure their kid is pursuing a meaningful career based on their passions.

I think successful parents generally follow one of the following two routes:
1) Allow their kid to study whatever in college because they are confident in their ability to support their kids even after college when kids are unemployed. Or find them jobs regardless of their education.
2) Make sure the kid pursues the best education and the best opportunities to become even more successful than the parent.

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Most Helpful
Mar 15, 2019

In a nutshell, successful parents will raise basically independent children (physically, mentally, emotionally, financially).

If your kid is the most kick-ass gender studies major out there, they will be a tenured Harvard gender studies professor, will write books, become a Senator, etc. There's a lucrative, independent path for everyone if they strive for the top of their field.

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Mar 15, 2019

If your kid is the most kick-ass gender studies major out there, they will be a tenured Harvard gender studies professor, will write books, become a Senator, etc. There's a lucrative, independent path for everyone if they strive for the top of their field.

SB'd for this.

Mar 15, 2019

Citadel $200-250k base+bonus + $150k signing undergrad. FAIR/Google AI ~$250k total comp. FB ~$170k + $110k signing.

Most top tech cos are around $130-180k total comp starting in core (product, data, design, eng) roles (https://www.whereto.tech/companies)
post-MBA would probably be MF PE or some fundamental HF with comp >$400-500k.

Doesn't really matter anyway, there are many ways to earn a good income.. if you're not skilled in building software or in reasoning around math then obviously it's kind of pointless considering the top 5-10% of career paths that utilise those skills.

I'd just encourage my kid to do whatever they're good at but at the best institution they can get into. Don't understand why everyone is obsessed with ROI on "majors".. there are philosophy and history majors who go into kickass careers all the time. Majors and careers are largely decoupled because of individual aptitude - the problem is lack of career guidance and access to information around career paths hence the abysmal results for less career-oriented majors like english or art history.

Mar 16, 2019
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