How difficult is relocation (Canada to US)

valueseeker's picture
Rank: Chimp | 6

BComm graduated in 2014; currently working (for about a year now) in private debt of a lifeco based in Toronto Canada. I'm looking to move to Seattle for relationship reasons..but have no network whatsoever in Seattle. My firm's US operation is in Boston so it's not an option. I'm a Canadian citizen.

Anyone has any idea as to how difficult/realistic that I could get something there? Or advice on how I could start looking?

Comments (21)

Apr 28, 2015

Hi friend,

You should really look into all of these companies, as they're generally the ones who sponsor.
http://www.myvisajobs.com/Reports/2014-H1B-Visa-Sp...
Secondly, look into companies that specifically have strong business practices in private debt, then see which ones have offices in Seattle. Network, network, network, and you'll be able to find something.

If you do wind up finding something, but you're not too keep on taking it, look into positions in Portland or Vancouver. Both those locations are only 2.5 hours from Seattle, and you'd at least be able to see your SO on the weekends.

happy to give advice; no asking for referrals please

Apr 28, 2015

Thanks for the advice..I was hoping that H1B is not the only route; wouldn't TN Visa work?

Apr 28, 2015

As an American, I'm very hazy on the various Visa offerings.
If you need a strategy, reach out to me.
If you need specific knowledge, you're better off consulting other parts of the internet

happy to give advice; no asking for referrals please

Apr 28, 2015

I'm going to go ahead and guess your likely at Manulife, in which case I don't think you'll be able to transfer to Seattle. I don't believe they really have any operations there. As noted above I would consider looking into moving to Vancouver. Unless you have a large business to sponsor you or old an advanced degree, its gonna be pretty hard to get a Visa and will take a while too.

Apr 28, 2015

Yeah you are right I'm at Manulife...I was thinking about just going to school there - would be easier to get a Visa and start building my network. but going back to school after like one year of work experience seems like a complete waste of time.

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Apr 28, 2015

I am guessing you have an investment role and in this case, it's hard to use the TN as the closest listed profession is economist, but it's not really what you do so your employer need to be very creative in drafting your employment letter / job description. Because of this, big firms outside of the tech space are reluctant to to "lie" and use the TN Visa.

Apr 28, 2015
mtnmmnn:

I am guessing you have an investment role and in this case, it's hard to use the TN as the closest listed profession is economist, but it's not really what you do so your employer need to be very creative in drafting your employment letter / job description. Because of this, big firms outside of the tech space are reluctant to to "lie" and use the TN Visa.

This is bad advice, TN is common and depends on your degree as much or more than your job.

Apr 29, 2015
mrb87:

"mtnmmnn" wrote:I am guessing you have an investment role and in this case, it's hard to use the TN as the closest listed profession is economist, but it's not really what you do so your employer need to be very creative in drafting your employment letter / job description. Because of this, big firms outside of the tech space are reluctant to to "lie" and use the TN Visa.

This is bad advice, TN is common and depends on your degree as much or more than your job.

I am sorry, but the TN is 100% dependent on your job (even though a bachelor is a requirement) and your paperwork need to be bullet proof as there is nowadays much more scrutiny at the border (especially for people under management consultant, economist or system analyst professions). I don't really care to start an argument, but I think there's quite a bit of disconnect between people who have used TN visas and those who have just heard of them and it's not as easy as many make it out to be (both my brother and I got a job in the US through one, him pre-crisis doing software engineering for a well-known tech firm and me doing PE at MM, have loads of Canadian friends who moved to the US for work or tried , but it's only my informed opinion).

Apr 30, 2015

I have a friend in fixed income buyside in NYC on an TN. PM and I think I can give you some insight.

I have also personally used the H1-B as well as the TN three times.

Apr 30, 2015

I'm very familiar with moving from Canada to the US. If you don't have a company that is sponsoring you then the best advice anyone one here can give you is talk to an immigration lawyer, preferably one in the US.

Going through a lawyer was the best money I ever spent. He outlined the options and which one he recommended and why. The process was time consuming, which he warned me about, but everything went through without a hitch.

Everyone is right that your paperwork has to be perfect and its amazing how much better you are treated when you have a lawyer sitting next to you at the consulate.

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May 1, 2015

I'm based in Vancouver. If you want help or feedback on some specific names in town shoot me a message.

May 1, 2015

very hard, ur prob screwed. they take 1-2 kids per year from each school.

May 1, 2015

i doubt sternasta knows what he's talking about.

Depends which school. Ivey places the most undergrads in the States, but if you want to work for a US BB in the United States, going to school in the states is your best bet. Otherwise, Ivey and Queen's seem to have the US BB's recruit there most heavily vs. other schools in Canada. This is for positions in Toronto and NYC.

May 1, 2015

heard UBC (on the west coast) sent 3 kids to GS this year (2 at NYC, 1 in Calgary)

May 1, 2015
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