How do you get an MBB offer?

Hey, I had a question about the interview process for consulting, specifically for MBB. I've searched but couldn't find exactly what I was looking for, but if there is already a discussion on this, please post it and I'll be on my way.

I am getting a Master's in Statistics at a semi-target. MBB recruits here, so I guess a "target" but non-ivy level for sure.

I realize after getting an interview, a lot of your qualifications go out the window and it becomes a lot more about fit, but it seems more so for consulting. Is this true?

Assuming I can get a first round, is the only way to get an offer just killing the case interviews?

Thanks

Comments (31)

Apr 4, 2013

Troll?

Apr 4, 2013

The same way you got them to approach you with the red and blue pills.

Apr 4, 2013
toystore:

I realize after getting an interview, a lot of your qualifications go out the window and it becomes a lot more about fit, but it seems more so for consulting. Is this true?

Assuming I can get a first round, is the only way to get an offer just killing the case interviews?

Thanks

Yes and no.

I'm assuming that by saying "qualifications go out the window," we're saying that your resume won't technically make or break the rest of the interviewing process.

That being said, you have to consider the fact that your qualifications/resume/interests/activities should be a representation of you. Every interviewer is going to have your resume out and ask you about what you did at X and how you made an impact at Y. Be personable, detailed, and humble about your experiences.

Then go crush the case.

If you were memorable in a positive light, you'll get an offer.

Apr 4, 2013

The Sour Patch Kid: No

FSC: Don't get the parallel between The Matrix and MBB...

NanoStapler: Thanks for the reply. I understand not ALL of your qualifications go out the window, but things like GPA and University play a lot less of a roll once you get the interview.

Also, I was on Glassdoor, reading about MBB interviews and it seemed like the majority of them were pure cases. Maybe the first one had a bit of fit questions/walk me through your resume, but after that, it appeared to be case after case.

Has anyone been through the interview process?

Apr 4, 2013
toystore:

Also, I was on Glassdoor, reading about MBB interviews and it seemed like the majority of them were pure cases. Maybe the first one had a bit of fit questions/walk me through your resume, but after that, it appeared to be case after case.

Has anyone been through the interview process?

Compared to regular behavioral interviews, most consulting interviews are extremely weighted towards the case in terms of time.
Most likely 80 - 90% of the time will be spent on the case.

I went through MBB recruiting this cycle and would be glad to answer any other questions you have if you want to PM me.

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Apr 5, 2013
toystore:

Has anyone been through the interview process?

I really hate to be this guy, but use the search function. There have been uncountably many threads on this subject.

Apr 5, 2013

I can't speak for BB, but I'll share my experience with McK.

1. You're right, once you are being interviewed, it's a lot less about who you are on paper (resume, grades, etc) and much more about how you present who you are in person.

2. Killing the case is pretty much a must but even that doesn't guarantee that you will move on/get the offer. Each McK interview follows a standard format (15 minute behavioral, 40-45 minute case) so if you ace the case and flop on the behavioral you are DEFINITELY not passing.

3. Behavioral is for assessing your ability to respond to questions, back up your assertions, and hold up under pressure. In my opinion, it's for answering two questions: are you a good fit and are you presentable to a client. At McK, behavioural is almost always a "tell me about a time when you.." question where the interviewer will interject randomly with questions as you are explaining.

Good luck!

Apr 5, 2013
toystore:

I've searched but couldn't find exactly what I was looking for, but if there is already a discussion on this, please post it and I'll be on my way.

If you could post one of these, I would be very grateful. I couldn't find one that focused specifically on the interview process.

Apr 5, 2013

M: nail all the quantitative calculations, and do it without ums or ahs. Also, there is definitely a right answer to the cases. You have to drill down to it. If you can't do these things while charming them, you're fucked. Lastly: easier to recruit in non-US locations than US. US standards are higher. GL you chucklehead.

Apr 5, 2013
ivoteforthatguy:

easier to recruit in non-US locations than US. US standards are higher.

source?

Apr 5, 2013

1) read case in point, mckinsey quarterly (gives you interesting things to talk about, much better than typical news paper, and to say on your case interviews), and read case books
2) Practice Practice Practice, ask all your friends, ask anyone who rejected you for feedback, and constantly ask for feedback (not bs like good communication but actual feedback like before you do a case market sizing, say 3 ways you can get it eg. survey, look at revenue stream, ask management, benchmark/comparables and compare with our stastics, and then do the actual sizing)
3) try to keep in mind that you can probably get passed the first round by doing everything "standard" in an interview but for 2nd round you need to stand out. Getting the right answer is not good enough, so show some flare : ). Make the problem harder. Go one step above. This is not a finance class. You can get 100% and not stand a chance. You need to get everything right and then add something on top (eg. mckinsey quarterly ratings, instead of asking a lot of questions just throw out like 50 possibilities before you make hypothesis, something to show that you did your homework)

Apr 5, 2013

Thanks for that last reply there.

I have just ordered Case in Point on amazon, so I will see what that gives very soon. Nobody had really recommended me to read mckinsey quarterly, so I will have a look into that.

Any other sources that are useful from your experience?

Apr 5, 2013

caseinterview.com

Apr 5, 2013

some luck too

Apr 5, 2013

nail all the quantitative calculations, and do it without ums or ahs. Also, there is definitely a right answer to the cases. You have to drill down to it.

excellent advice

Make the problem harder. Go one step above. This is not a finance class. You can get 100% and not stand a chance. You need to get everything right and then add something on top (eg. mckinsey quarterly ratings, instead of asking a lot of questions just throw out like 50 possibilities before you make hypothesis, something to show that you did your homework)

terrible advice - this will make you seem totally unstructured, throwing out a "laundry list" is a really bad idea!
There is a time when to sprinkle in your extra knowledge (be it from BusinessWeek or Mck Quarterly) and thats at the END of the case when you solved it correctly.
I'll give you an example (real case), lets say your case is profitability of a bank, you find out the problem is that your retail customers are doing great but the bank's corporate business is failing because of non performing loans. Interviewer closes case, you ask if it was a real case and what he did, he says they shifted from corporate to retail customers, THEN you can add your own knowledge and make it into a discussion and say "hmm thats very interesting, I guess additionally one could have tried to sell the distressed loans to funds/other banks, etc etc". But if you throw it into the actual case without it being relevant it will make you seem very unstructured (biggest ding factor I'd say)

I like pickles...

Apr 5, 2013

its only unstructured if you do it bad. I was told that structure was my strong point when i did it..... obviously don't throw them out in a random order. Throw them out in categories with a tree based on basic frameworks and ask leading questions before expanding on points to double check you are in right area and you gotta throw them out fast. You are thinking just like random idea, check random idea, ding, etc thats obviously horrible. It is all about delivery. You can add extra stuff at multiple times, not jsut the end, if you do it correctly and it flows

Apr 5, 2013

For example say its a delivery problem, you can mention thats its delivery due to certian possibilities, supplier, distributor, technology, or other. In terms of supplier, maybe the supplier is slow, requires time to make item, etc, etc..... In terms of technology, there could be slow shipment technology, there could be a slow order process technology, etc.... In terms of other, there could be government problems blocking delivery, trade problems, labor strikes, etc. That could have easily been 20 wihtin 1 subcategory. Very organized and easy to follow and doesn't eat time in case, probably wouldve taken me like 1 minute to say, and pretty organized...

Then say which area you would like to focus on with a leading question and reasoning, flows easy

Apr 5, 2013

One very good point brought up that has slipped through the cracks on this thread - ask firms who have rejected you for feedback. This is crucial because we all have an achilees heel, and for some it can even be debilitating. Getting some 'rejector's feedback" would be the best way to solve this issue.

If you've never been rejected, then practice with your school's career development dept and some friends, and see if there are any commonalities in their feedback. And take that feedback on board, don't brush it off.

Apr 5, 2013

Use the search function here, the posts in the consulting forum cover this pretty broadly.

Apr 5, 2013

Thanks for all the tips. I just had my first 2 case interviews at at kearney this morning, and I think it went pretty much great!

I have indeed found other sources for practicing material on the forum here. I just ordered 2 new books on cracking case interviews, and will see what that gives. Anybody has ever ordered this LOMS program?? it is def very expensive, im a bit doubting on that one...

Thankzz!!

Olsa

Apr 5, 2013

I have the LOMS program and found it very useful! It's probably better for polishing up your case skills rather than it is for teaching you how to solve them. When I used the program, I tried to solve the case along with the candidate Victor Cheng was interviewing and found it to be pretty effective.

Best of luck!

Apr 5, 2013

This advice is more applicable for final rounds interviews. I am working at MBB, and in my final interview (which was with the most senior person at the office - basically the person who had the most clout), when he asked me if I had any questions, I used that time to tell him why I wanted to work for the firm and what I can bring. I tried to be concise and pointed out three things, giving detailed examples. Later, I was told by the director that this final speech of mine contributed to my getting an offer, because he was impressed that I took a chance and sincerely demonstrated my interest.

Apr 5, 2013

When it comes to consulting London is fucked up, incredibly high standards.

Can you elaborate on this? I am thinking about going to a London office at some point.

I like pickles...

Apr 5, 2013
mk2012:

When it comes to consulting London is fucked up, incredibly high standards.

Can you elaborate on this? I am thinking about going to a London office at some point.

London is one of the hotspots for consulting around the world. Everyone wants to be there, a lot of the interesting work is there, etc. So the bar for getting into MBB in London is higher than it is in many other places.

The mere fact that it is competitive, and the fact that it is perceived to be more prestigious, creates a feedback loop that makes the ultra-competitive want to prove themselves by being there.

Transferring offices of course is a different matter.

Apr 5, 2013

does anyone know if all quant calculations need to be done in the head? And are they expecting immediate answers to the not obvious ones (i.e. not 2s, 5s, 10s but more so decimals, etc.)

Apr 5, 2013
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Apr 5, 2013
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