How have you quit?

Jiggy95's picture
Rank: Baboon | 159

I'm an hour away from telling my boss I'm resigning. This is/was my first job out of school, and want to leave on good terms (staying in the industry just going principle side). I'd love to hear all of your stories from when you resigned, good or bad.

Pray for me fellas.

Comments (68)

Dec 3, 2019

Are you brokerage right now?

Array

Dec 3, 2019

Yes, Multi investment sales to be specific.

Dec 3, 2019

Just did the same thing, and headed to the same place... Asked my boss to chat and basically said I had accepted an offer to work at XXXX firm. It sounds really basic and anti climactic because it was. After I told him, he just said, "yeah, I'd do the same exact thing if I were you." So think it went pretty well. We were also a close knit team, so mentioned how hard it was to leave and that it was a really tough decision. At the end of the day, no one can ding you for going to the principal side (especially if its a really incredible opportunity), and if they do ding you or try to belittle that choice in anyway, probably best to leave and cut off communication. If they are supportive and understanding, probably have your best interests in mind, and you should stay in touch. Regardless, congrats! Enjoy the accomplishment, and don't put too much pressure on yourself when breaking the news.

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Dec 3, 2019

This is what I did too. I was very nervous at first because I liked my coworkers and managers a lot, but after I told my manager it was a huge load of shoulders, and they were very understanding and accepting. I've kept in touch with some of them since.

Dec 3, 2019

I spoke with my boss first, I gave a month notice. They had been good for me, I feel that giving good notice is one thing that could help your reputation, it gives them time to replace you, etc.

Dec 4, 2019

oops

Dec 3, 2019

If you're leaving from a service provider to the principal side your boss should understand and be chill. When lenders, brokers, etc hire analysts they talk about wanting to grow you and you sticking with the firm but they know the appeal of the principal side is there and they are ok with it. Many former analysts become future borrowers, and buyers and sellers of real estate. You're more likely to hit up your old boss for a loan or to sell a property in the future.

It's when you leave for a direct competitor that people get pissed.

    • 4
Dec 3, 2019
creditcreditcredit:

You're more likely to hit up your old boss for a loan or to sell a property in the future.

I'm young enough that this hasn't happened yet, but this is a great point.

Dec 4, 2019

This is why you see top shops (Eastdil/ former HFF/ CBRE) enter a virtuous cycle to continue to be top shops. People can work at a great firm, leave to go be a REPE/ Development Analyst, then eventually they work their way up. Likely the old boss still works at his shop and you can hit them up for a loan/ sale.

Eastdil places well because they do very large, institutional deals. Eastdil does very large, institutional deals (at lease partially) because they place well.

"The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates, and a monthly salary." - Nassim Taleb

  • Analyst 1 in Other
Dec 3, 2019

I have too much experience quitting jobs.

First time, I hated my job. Absolutely awful and not what I studied in school. Told my boss at one of our regular one on one meetings; he was super caught off guard, but ultimately we agreed it was the best career choice bc long term that job wouldn't suit me.

Second time was similar, liked my boss but my coworkers were making it toxic and I was still soul searching/needed something more challenging. Told my boss, took her way off guard but she said she had a feeling it was coming. We both cried but ended on good terms.

Plot twist: A few months later I realized the grass isn't always greener. This new job was a robotic mind numbing hell where I would get so pigeonholed I'd be stuck there forever. There were blatant red flags I ignored and I regret taking this decision all the time. Luckily I had stayed in touch with my former bosses and learned that my previous company had a position open back up under my old boss. So after a week of pro/conning and swallowing my pride, on a Friday at 4 pm, I marched into the directors office to tell him my last day was in 2 weeks, and that one of those two weeks I was on vacation, so really just 5 working days left. I was so nervous I started choking up with tears and he legit told me to stop crying..so I immediately stopped. He asked a bunch of questions about why, if it was a specific person, and that he thought I didn't like my last job. Awkward convo. Word got around office quickly. Had to have the awkward convo x100 to the HR lady and she flat out told me how she thinks the partner who hired me was a huge d*ck and that the job sucked, she would never want to do it all day everyday either. I basically became a running joke but still scored a free goodbye lunch. I actually miss those coworkers but i cut ties immediately with anyone there cause it's just weird. I actually block this whole situation out of my memory.

Fast forward, I recently quit again because I finally found an opportunity i am hopeful will set me up for where I want to be long term. I'm now eternally designated as the butt of every new job or millennial working joke.

Long story short: DO NOT burn any bridges. Speak up to your manager if you don't like the direction your job is going. People are gonna make comments regardless of what you do so you might as well let them remember your name for when your rich AF

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Most Helpful
Dec 3, 2019

You sure do cry a lot

    • 37
Dec 3, 2019

Yeah wtf? Of all the things I would do when quitting/getting fired crying probably isn't one of them

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  • Analyst 1 in Other
Dec 4, 2019

You could argue that women are too emotional. Could be worse. I know of someone whose (woman) boss cried when he asked for a raise

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Controversial
Dec 4, 2019
Analyst 1 in Other:

You could argue that women are too emotional.

You would be both boring and misogynist for doing so, but sure, you could

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    • 8
Dec 3, 2019

wahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

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Dec 5, 2019
Analyst 1 in Other:

Told my boss, took her way off guard but she said she had a feeling it was coming. We both cried but ended on good terms.

I just don't see me and a MD doing this. Ever.

    • 1
Dec 5, 2019

yeah, you're right. I'm calling shenanigans too. This never happened.

Dec 3, 2019

Recently went through the exact same process, first job out of school and headed to principal side. I'm sure not everything I'll list was true for you, but I focused on the fact that it was a really tough decision and was completely opportunity based as opposed to a state of unhappiness in my current situation. Told them I wasn't actively looking (which was true), and that an opportunity presented itself over the course of a few months after multiple conversations with someone I'd met through my professional network. In my situation there was nothing they could have done, which I told them, as the decision was geared towards getting exposure to the principal side that I wasn't able to get in investment sales/brokerage. Similar to an earlier post, I gave a month's notice because of the respect I had for my bosses and how they'd treated me, which I think is an easy way to end on a good note if you're able to do it. Conversation went as well as one like that could, and I fully expect to keep in contact with them as time goes on. Try not to stress about it too much as I'd expect them to be understanding. Congrats on the new role, enjoy it.

    • 2
Dec 3, 2019

You will be good, just be thankful for all the experience and tell him how he helped you through teaching, coaching, mentorship, etc... Say your dream is X and this is what you need to do to achieve it. There shouldn't be any hard feelings. Draft a short resignation letter and go in with it especially if you are for sure 100% gone. Offer a final two week period and pledge to help tie out any loose ends.

Dec 3, 2019

I asked to be promoted to partner as a first year analyst

    • 1
Dec 4, 2019

If you were serious you would have given an ultimatum...losers ask.

BillMurray:

I asked to be promoted to partner as a first year analyst

If the glove don't fit, you must acquit!

    • 1
Dec 3, 2019

I've quit twice and always enjoyed it. Not for the awkward conversation, but because after you basically have two weeks of doing nothing. Don't get me wrong, I really enjoy working and hate being lazy, but there is no better feeling then quitting a job you hate and taking a break on the firm's dime while you get ready for the next opportunity.

Job 1 - Quit after two years to move to a new city (went to a competitor). My bosses didn't really care and were happy for me. They were screwed because the other analyst quit a week prior, but it didn't matter to me because I was psyched for the move. I spent the following two weeks showing up at 1030, going to my apartment for VERY long lunches and watching Game of Thrones, leaving early, and partying every night as I said bye to my friends in that city. Didn't like the job so was ready to get out of there.

Job 2 - Quit to go to a competitor and it was awkward, but my bosses weren't the type to yell at my face. They were clearly angry though because they were down an analyst and weren't expecting it. They asked me to finish up two BOVs during my final 2 weeks but I had already finished them before I quit. Kept them on my desk for almost 2 weeks and sent them on my last day. Spent 90% of my days meeting up with friends, walking around the city, and finding a bench outside to watch Netflix/Hulu on my phone. Really hated this job so quitting was one of the greatest feelings I've experienced.

Love my current job so slightly disappointed I won't be able to get a nice break like that anytime soon.

    • 4
Dec 3, 2019

I never understood getting upset at analysts for leaving, staff up. I had an analyst quit for principal side last year - she's been far more profitable for us over there giving dispo insights than she ever would have over here.

Leaving for a competitor is different, and if so, prepare for all server access to be cut immediately and your not getting asked to finish the 2-weeks.

Dec 3, 2019

Don't over think it. Tell them you've accepted another offer, thank them for the opportunity, put in your 2 weeks, and offer to do your best to wrap up any pressing items before you leave. That's all you can control.

If they're happy for you then that's great great. But if their not, there's nothing you can do. I remember the feeling when I quit my first job so I can relate, but the world keeps turning and your time there will soon be just a memory for you and them.

Dec 3, 2019

Went really well, my MD is such a bro. Already mentioned land sites for us to check out. Super excited for the next step, thanks for all the stories boys.

    • 2
Dec 4, 2019

Nice. Good to hear it went well

"The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates, and a monthly salary." - Nassim Taleb

    • 1
Dec 4, 2019
Jiggy95:

Went really well, my MD is such a bro. Already mentioned land sites for us to check out. Super excited for the next step, thanks for all the stories boys.

Make sure you stay in touch with him. Grab coffee or lunch 2-3 times a year. Good relationships are ones you want to hold on to.

Dec 4, 2019

Yes 100% will do this team runs this region so it was in my new group's best interest to make sure I left on good terms. In the end it's best for everyone, cause I know exactly who I would use to dispose of our assets etc (Old team).

Dec 4, 2019

I set fire to the building.
-Milton

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  • Associate 2 in CorpDev
Dec 4, 2019

My last farewell email:

"Dear colleagues,
Let me start by first saying this is the happiest day of my life...."

    • 2
Dec 4, 2019

Left a company shortly after completing the FLDP. It was more tough than just giving a regular 2 weeks because all through the program people were talking about how much the company was investing in me, how they expect to get returns on that investment, how attrition is really bad in the program, how they wanted to keep in touch through my rotations, etc. And they seemed to work really hard to improve attrition.. bigger raises, more access to execs, etc. So to get a great multi-role, multi-location, multi-year corpfin bootcamp and then to pack up and leave right after made me pretty terrified to call up my manager and FLDP manager and give my notice.

But they took it in stride, life was awkward for a few weeks, and I made my jump and that was that. I imagine future notices will be a lot easier, so its good to get the worst out of the way.

    • 1
Dec 4, 2019

This is the type of shit that drives me crazy. Never ever feel bad about giving your two weeks, the whole company shtick driving home the point that they invested a lot in you and you should repay them with a return on their investment like you owe them something is just ridiculous. Companies would as soon cut you if you didn't work out or lay you off in lean times to save a buck, so never feel like you have to stay somewhere out of loyalty of the company/because that you owe them something. You only owe them work until your last day and they only owe you your last paycheck. Always do whats best for you. Any reputable company worth working for will take it in stride.

Dec 5, 2019

Yep- reading this exact advice on this site is what prepared me for the conversation. I knew for a while that the industry I was in was not for me in the long run, so I had plenty of time to scope out my exit and prepare to go. Landing that FLDP was the best I could have done from my non-target, so it took some time to get over the feeling of indebtedness.. But I had to look long term: getting to the top means making uncomfortable choices, having awkward conversations, putting your career first. Best to start practicing those things right away.

    • 1
Dec 4, 2019

When I gave my notice at my first job - in brokerage - I was fired on the spot and was told I'd never make it in the industry. Hilarious.

When I gave my notice at my second job, to go to graduate school, I was also fired shortly after. 2/2.

Employers can be dumb. Never feel bad about leaving.

    • 2
Dec 4, 2019
CRE:

When I gave my notice at my first job - in brokerage - I was fired on the spot and was told I'd never make it in the industry. Hilarious.

When I gave my notice at my second job, to go to graduate school, I was also fired shortly after. 2/2.

Employers can be dumb. Never feel bad about leaving.

Weird, most HR wouldn't allow that. fUnemployment is nice tho.

If the glove don't fit, you must acquit!

Dec 4, 2019

Implying that a lot of the smaller, good-ol'-boy companies give a shit about HR.

Dec 4, 2019

Yeah it's pretty crazy that we all enter into these at will agreements.

"The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates, and a monthly salary." - Nassim Taleb

Dec 4, 2019

It's totally human nature to be nervous quitting your first job / few jobs. However, what you will come to realize is its not a big deal at all. Your bosses have had countless people leave over the years and have they themselves left.

Typically it plays itself out like this....jr employee stressing out for a while on how boss will react...only to have boss be super chill about it when told.

Be professional and thankful but don't put much thought into it.

Dec 4, 2019

I would bet money that I will be fired after giving my two weeks notice (which I will in a few months). Oh well, it'll make for good WSO content.

"The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates, and a monthly salary." - Nassim Taleb

    • 1
Dec 4, 2019

What are your plans? grad school?

    • 1
Dec 4, 2019

Hire a slixa girl to roleplay with in the office. Play it off like its nothing. Security will need you to sign her in .

Dec 4, 2019

best strategy (listen til the end):

an alternative is half baked:

    • 1
Dec 4, 2019

If you are a valued employee, the best way to resign is to communicate it ahead of time. Communicating that you are unhappy and thinking of leaving is far better received than surprising everyone by packing up your desk and walking out the door.

Communicating your intentions ahead of time is the polite thing to do for a couple of reasons: 1.) It gives the firm time to allocate responsibilities from you to another employee on your team 2.) It gives your firm a heads up to start looking for your replacement, 3.) It gives you a chance to voice any issues you have to your boss 4.) It gives your boss a chance to keep you, and or help you find a job elsewhere.

Where your boss will get mad is if you hide your intentions, or make false pretenses that you are staying when you are looking for other opportunities. Make your intentions known and be crystal clear as to the reasons why you are looking elsewhere.

    • 2
Dec 4, 2019

I think this is good depending on people's relationships with their bosses. This can backfire and someone can get fired on the spot

"The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates, and a monthly salary." - Nassim Taleb

Dec 5, 2019

Agree. But if you're willing to talk to your boss about leaving, perhaps you should be mentally prepared to leave. Also, if your boss is vindictive enough to fire you over a conversation, is it worth staying?

    • 1
Dec 4, 2019

You could always tell them in a heartfelt and personal way how you feel about each and every one of them. Thank them for their unique contributions to yourself as a person. Then show them The Goat.

    • 2
Dec 5, 2019

highly underrated movie.

showing the goat is also one of the most liberating things you can do, it's a great icebreaker at dinner parties, family reunions, davos breakout sessions, or prostate examinations

    • 2
Dec 10, 2019

amen brother. Gotta let Da Goat be da goat, and go roam about free. Say hi to grandma and the folks in Salt Lake City.

Dec 4, 2019
    • 1
Dec 5, 2019

Work your leave, especially supporting processes or software of your devising. And write a nice letter. The following was from me, a while ago:

Dear [first name of boss],

This is just a brief note to give formally my resignation from employment [employer].
However, I would like to take this opportunity to say that I have enjoyed working with you, and that I have learnt much during my [number] years here. I can only hope that I have taught at least something in return.

Wishing you all the best for the future,

Hand the letter over during the meeting. The date on it starts the clock on gardening leave.

Dec 5, 2019

My first boss out of college once told me that in business, you never owe anyone anything more than two weeks notice. I'm rocking with that advice.

Dec 5, 2019

You can do what I did last time I quit a job. The offer expired in 72 hours so I had to overnight the signed offer letter across the country. I printed the agreements at my work office but our shitty printer locked up (old HP, no printer screen). The FedEx closed in an hour so I cancelled all the jobs on the printer and ran to FedEx.

A couple hours later, I get a text from a co-worker: "You left your offer letter on the printer. Congratulations. You deserve it. By the way, James got fired today and he's cleaning out his office tomorrow."

I asked him to not share it and he said: "Too late."

So everyone in the office (including the guy who got fired) knew where I was working, what I was making and my sign on bonus.

I show up the next day, don't say a word to anyone. Walk straight into my bosses office and let him know. No big deal.

I tell the team this is my last day and they say: "This week?" ....nope.

James is boxing up his stuff and two police officers show up. James was a gun nut and everyone knew he had a Glock in his bag.

So one guy's life is falling apart and everyone knows I just got a big raise. Weird day.

    • 1
Dec 6, 2019

That first colleague sounds like a prick

Dec 6, 2019
Htownrr:

I printed the agreements at my work office

Rookie moves

"The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates, and a monthly salary." - Nassim Taleb

  • Associate 1 in S&T - FI
Dec 7, 2019
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    • 1
Dec 11, 2019