How much sleep do you need

Woolymammoth1's picture
Rank: Gorilla | 727

Currently a college student and i find i actually need a lot of sleep. Even when i get 8 hours i still wake up exhausted, which makes me shit scared of banking. Anybody else have/had this problem? How do you get over this damn burden?

Comments (105)

Best Response
Jan 22, 2018

There's certainly nothing wrong with you, ha. I still find that I'm relatively tired if I don't get 7 hours of sleep (on most nights it's limited to 6-6.5). Drinking heavy amounts of caffeine is a bit of a crutch, but may not be prudent to some people as I've found that it disrupts sleep cycles if you drink in excess. (I don't drink coffee regularly)

One of the things that help me stay awake and active are lifting weights 3-4 times a week and staying properly hydrated. I drink anywhere from 1-1.5 gallons of water per day, which I found to be helpful in staying alert. With respect to the brutal hours, this is something that unfortunately can't really be avoided. There will be certain instances during a 2-3 year analyst stint where you will be crushed and won't get an adequate level of sleep by any standard. During these periods your body tends to adjust quite remarkably, as you find that you can run and function well on 4.5 hours of sleep (part of this is adrenaline from working constantly during this period, admittedly).

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Apr 12, 2018

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Jan 22, 2018

I had (have) this exact same fear. I pushed myself a lot last summer and found I was getting roughy 5-6 hours per night. I am still scared I won't be able to survive the brutal weeks that accompany banking. I too am like you, I feel exhausted after 7-8 hours of sleep. It can be hard for me to get stuff done. But when you're working for a firm and you sacrificed so much time and effort just to be able to walk through those doors, you will fight through the tiredness. Because at the end of the day, what is the alternative? Sleep a little longer to come in equally as tired, but now late? At that point you are seen as a slacker and still have to do the same amount of work. I had actual nightmares going into last summer, that I would sleep through work, that I couldn't do it, etc. However, each day I made myself be the first guy in. It is just determination, plain and simple. There probably wasn't much I could have done to ease my nerves going into the summer, as I really doubted myself. Just go in with an open mind and the attitude that you will survive, and it will feel good to push yourself past what you thought you were capable of.

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Jan 31, 2018

Well said

Jan 22, 2018
blueshine144:

the longest week I had was 79.5 hours

From the hours you cite, I believe your experience is largely atypical unless you work in sponsors, ECM or DCM. Analysts in my (industry coverage) group average slightly north of 80hrs per week according to HR (around in line with my experience).

I've been full time for 9 months and had a very difficult time at first. Caffeine stopped working around three weeks in due to downing 2-4 cups of coffee a day so I started tinkering with my schedule. The items below worked well for me:

  1. Consistency on weekends - while you should be in a rhythm on the weekdays, don't turn off your alarm/hit the snooze button unless you have had rough nights on Friday / Saturday (work related, not from drinking)
  2. Water before bed
  3. Water with a piece of fruit or throw in a splash of lemon/orange/lime juice in the morning (maybe personal since I usually skip breakfast on week days)
  4. If you're really struggling with morning inertia, do ten push ups immediately after waking up
  5. If you're a heavy sleeper, invest in an alarm clock that can turn on your lights (some are pricey, instead you can plug a light into a smart outlet (~$10 on amazon))
  6. For long-term improvement, add a bit of cardio to your workouts; sprint work is fine
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Feb 4, 2018

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Jan 25, 2018

All good pieces of advice. The other one I will say is don't drink that much, especially during the week. Even a couple of beers can make you exhausted and really diminish the quality of your sleep. Eating well and working out consistently are also really important, even though it can be really hard to swing when you're working shitty hours and eating most of your meals at your desk.

More than anything, the quality of your sleep is what's going to determine how you feel. 6 hours of quality deep sleep where you wake up during a natural light sleep cycle is way more refreshing than 8-9 hours of intermittent poor quality sleep. Focus on improving the quality of your sleep to make up for having less time to sleep. You can control your quality of sleep through alarms and stuff, but staying hydrated, not drinking, and eating a healthy diet without too much sugar or processed carbs are also really critical here.

Ultimately, your body gets adjusted and starts to get it. I've actually found that waking up, working, being active all day has given me more energy than when I was fucking around at school with an irregrular sleep schedule, drinking every night, and not doing any work a lot of the time.

Jan 28, 2018
Your boy Blue:

Caffeine stopped working around three weeks in due to downing 2-4 cups of coffee a day so I started tinkering with my schedule.

2-4 cups of coffee a day?

What is this minor league?

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Jan 22, 2018

Buy a good mattress, it will help make the sleep you do get more meaningful.

Jan 22, 2018

All great advice, thanks. Anybody know those people that can't wake up later than 8am and are energetic from the moment they wake up? what chemical imbalance do they have that others don't.....

Jan 23, 2018

This is me. I work for a BB and I'm rarely in the office later than 7AM and it's not a struggle for me at all, I've always been a morning person. I rarely drink coffee, I don't do energy drinks, nothing special to get me up at that hour. I can take the GMAT as soon as my eyes are open, my mind is ready.

I don't know about chemical imbalances but I can tell you that I'm very sensitive to any sort of stimulants. Caffeine has always had a strong effect on me - if I have even a single cup (8 oz) of coffee at 8AM I'll still be feeling the effects that night and will struggle to fall asleep because I'll be all amped up. I even avoid things like ice tea after 2PM because I'll still feel it at bed time.

One winter I felt like I was coming down with bronchitis and someone recommended BronkAid to me, which is basically legal meth (I didn't realize it at the time). Worst idea ever, that stuff kept me awake for 5 days straight, no exaggeration. I ended up in the hospital and they wouldn't believe me when I told them I've been awake for that long.

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Jan 27, 2018
GoingToBeAnMD:

I don't know about chemical imbalances but I can tell you that I'm very sensitive to any sort of stimulants. Caffeine has always had a strong effect on me - if I have even a single cup (8 oz) of coffee at 8AM I'll still be feeling the effects that night and will struggle to fall asleep because I'll be all amped up.

Stimulants like coffee and energy drinks have the opposite effect on me. A few sips of coffee will make me pretty sleepy. It's good because I save money on these things and I won't get addicted to them either.

Jan 25, 2018

Pro-tip:

If you are drinking coffee in the morning, just get caffeine pills. You end up saving time and therefore sleeping longer. I transitioned to this, and even on days when I feel comatose, just popping a pill or two ensures I'm able to get up.

That being said, you still need to get 7+ hours of sleep average or you end up sleepy later. This really just helps with the initial wake-up period.

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Jan 25, 2018

Half the reason to drink coffee though is the enjoyment the taste and the ritual (my local baristas all know me and we shoot the shit every morning)

Jan 22, 2018

hey man, I could sleep forever back in college, now I'm itching to get out of bed after about 7 hours. if these simple fixes don't work, see a doc

  1. check your overall health
  • nightcaps are good for passing out, but not staying asleep, they're more harmful than helpful long term.
  • exercise, this is self explanatory
  • eat well
  1. find your sleep cycle. is it 90 mins, 120 mins, 67:15, what? google sleep cycles, too much out there for me to summarize briefly but basically if you wake up before it's over, regardless of the absolute amount of time you've been asleep, you'll feel tired. as an example, if yours is 90 mins, make sure you sleep in multiples of 1.5hrs, so sleeping 6 hrs will feel better than 6.5, 7.5 will feel better than 8, and so on.

**full disclosure, this one was the most impactful for me as I've never been obese, but that's just me

  1. other shit - no screens 1 hr before bed, no sugar after 5pm, no caffeine after noon, stuff like that, you'll see all over crossfitters' instagrams, try a bunch of shit, see what works. reading before bed? great! what about an essential oil diffuser? my wife swears by them and while idk if it works, she claims lavender helps her sleep. not mentioned but have also heard is helpful: yoga, podcasts, music, 3rd base, ambien.

my personal opinion is that if you get your sleep cycle nailed and have a hard workout some point during the day, you'll be tired enough to get quality sleep and your awake time will have you with more energy. I'm not a fan of pills so I'd try non-medicinal fixes, but I will say when I travel cross country, melatonin and red wine seem to get me right.

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Jan 24, 2018
thebrofessor:

2. find your sleep cycle.

Tried this today. Went to sleep 35 minutes later than normal and felt much better in the morning. Highest ROI strategy I've used (will update if this is not true long term).

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Jan 22, 2018

Do you snore or wake up with a sore throat? You might wana get a sleep study done to check for sleep apnea before you start

Jan 22, 2018

More than I've been able to get the last several years.

Jan 22, 2018

I can relate, but as previously mentioned, diet and exercise are key. This last semester I had no sleep and was exhausted everyday. When I realized that the problem wasn't the hours of sleep but instead the quality. I weight-lift about 5 times a week and cut out starch-based carbs from my diet and saw an instant boost in daily function. I get better sleep out of 6 hours now than I did from 9 hours before. Drinking water is also a big portion. If you drink a lot of coffee, I would recommend diluting it with water so you can function after crashes.

Jun 11, 2018
MarkBaum:

I can relate, but as previously mentioned, diet and exercise are key. This last semester I had no sleep and was exhausted everyday. When I realized that the problem wasn't the hours of sleep but instead the quality. I weight-lift about 5 times a week and cut out starch-based carbs from my diet and saw an instant boost in daily function. I get better sleep out of 6 hours now than I did from 9 hours before. Drinking water is also a big portion. If you drink a lot of coffee, I would recommend diluting it with water so you can function after crashes.

I agree with you. I'm a coffee drinker and I usually drink water after coffee. My problem is not the hours of sleep but also the quality because I'm having a difficult time to sleep without waking up from time to time especially during the wee hours

Jan 23, 2018

I am too a college student, and normally, I need 6-7 hours sleep per day to function properly.

"If you're afraid - don't do it, if you're doing it - don't be afraid!"
-- Genghis Khan

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Jan 23, 2018

Don't worry, I was the same way but you'd be surprised how much your body can handle.

Just try to get as much sleep as you can while working (give up watching a few youtube videos/FB/whatever before bed, etc.) and automate some small tasks on the weekends or when you're free (pre-preparing breakfast, laying out your clothes, etc).

Anything to get you even a few extra minutes a night.

Oh, and obviously catching up on some sleep over the weekend as well.

Jan 23, 2018

The key to getting more sleep is to get off to a good start, do good work, and develop a good reputation. It will suck for the first 6-9 months, but I have found that people develop impressions quickly and the best analysts not only got paid the most and worked on the best deals, but had more control over their time/schedules. The other piece of advice I have is to develop a good relationship with the staffer and the people on your deal teams. If you have a good relationship with them, they will "protect" you when you need them to and ensure that you are not overstaffed. However, if you are just that nameless analyst in the bullpen diligently grinding away, trust me, you will be in a world of hurt.

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Jan 23, 2018

Sometimes, I find it easier to just pull all nighters and crank the work out rather than to go to sleep and wake up again. Certainly not ideal, but works for me and may for you!

Jan 23, 2018

YOu need 7-8 hours for a reason...don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Half the kids that are in IB are zombies because they don't get proper sleep. It's honestly sad that a lot of these guys are willing to work like slaves and literally torture themselves with little sleep. They'll regret it one day when they're 40 years old, got a few million... but have been divorced 2-3 times, barely know their kids, and have the health of a 60 year old at age 40. NOt worth it. Go do wealth management or something kids.... your millions ain't worth shit in the city anyways. People that live in low COL cities and make ~$150k probably have nicer houses than you and that's the truth

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Jan 25, 2018

Yeah, but who wants to live in a McMansion in Charlotte...?

Jan 25, 2018

everyone's different, but frankly I'll take a tier 3 city any day over NYC.... I've never understood why people are so obsessed with that dirty shithole. That, and the tax man doesn't care if you live in a high COL city.

If that's what you like then go for it... in my opinion that's not a place to live a true "rich" life and raise a family. But if you want to slave away and be miserable, by all means.....

My guess is a lot of you will wake up one day and realize the money wasn't worth it. Health before wealth. When I was in IB my MD was in his late 30s and looked like he was 60. I didn't bother sticking around longer than a year. My quality of life is amazing now.

But "exit opps" you say.... cool go work for a large PE fund and work...... 60-70 hours (lol like that's any better)... oh and your $300k still doesn't buy you what $75k does in a tier 3 city. I live in a tier 3 city and you can buy one hell of a house for $400k.... something that would cost $2-3MM+ anywhere within an hour of NYC, if not more (and it would be old and ugly...so apples to oranges). Talking 3,000sq foot brand new cribs with all the nice designs and decors, not your early 1900s NYC "mansion"

you kids are so blind. bless your souls. IB isn't the end all be all. Most people that would WM make a killing if you stick with it... really any type of sales job. Med device sales, pharma sales... but my guess is most of you IB type aren't the sales type.

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Jan 24, 2018

I sleep 5 hours/night and drink either an espresso or a can of redbull every day. Never before have I been so productive. I used to sleep 8-10hrs/night in banking, but the more you sleep, the more tired you'll be, until you get yourself into a productive routine.

Jan 25, 2018

Ok not to hijack OP's original post, but my big question is how do people still have energy come 2-3 PM?? I could get literally a full 8 hour sleep in (which is rare) and still crash really hard come mid-afternoon. Does anyone else have this problem??? Coffee doesn't do anything at all and eating only makes it 2x worse.

Jan 25, 2018

Pretty normal. Have you tried taking a 15 min walk?

Jan 25, 2018

yea that usually helps or will grab a refill of coffee and sit outside for like 15 mins but i find as soon as i get back in front of my computer screens, my environment obviously isnt as stimulating and just get instantly zapped again.

what ive been trying is just having one earphone in while working. that kind of helps.

Jan 25, 2018

even sitting down 8 hours a day in front of the computer is brutal... and EXTREMELY UNHEALTHY. 14-16 hours? LMFAO you poor fucking souls. I'll make sure I get some sleep for you.

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Jan 25, 2018

People hate this idea but... Just quit coffee altogether. It'll be tough at first but it's one of the best decisions I've made in a looong time.

Jan 25, 2018

I feel that. its become more of a ritual rather than an actual pick me up. and that helped you make it past 2 w/o passing out?

Jan 28, 2018
allweneedisloveandbeer:

People hate this idea but... Just quit coffee altogether. It'll be tough at first but it's one of the best decisions I've made in a looong time.

I've toned down, but i'm not quitting. Its fine if you don't overdo it, like anything. Plus, lots of antioxidants especially if you add some 100% cacao (and dark chocolate almond milk as a creamer - my preference).

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Apr 21, 2018

Recently switched over to tea. It's too soon to say whether its been a help or a hindrance, but I certainly feel like my energy level is more stable throughout the day. Decided to quit because I got sick of the cycle of highs and lows that come with multiple cups of coffee per day.

Jan 26, 2018

This was me, then I stopped eating so many carbs (mostly just refined sugars and super processed grains). Now my energy levels are more or less constant through the day, and it's amazing.

Jan 26, 2018

define super processed grains? like brand name

Jan 27, 2018
rockrile15074:

Ok not to hijack OP's original post, but my big question is how do people still have energy come 2-3 PM?? I could get literally a full 8 hour sleep in (which is rare) and still crash really hard come mid-afternoon. Does anyone else have this problem??? Coffee doesn't do anything at all and eating only makes it 2x worse.

Yeah, this is pretty normal. A lot of bodies are programmed to take a nap at 2-3pm. Walking around, especially outside can help. Taking a 20-30 min nap helps also. Some people down two cups of colbrew, some pop an addie or moda, some do a 5-hr energy or red bull, some just power through it. If you're in a high-octane environment you might not even notice the sluggishness. I've seen a ton of methods to deal with the 2-3pm slowdown...you just have to find what works for you.

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Apr 20, 2018

Adderall does the trick for me.

Jan 25, 2018

Lol @ the college kids talking about being "exhausted".

Being exhausted in college means waking up hungover and a little achy from yesterday's lift.

Being exhausted in your early career:

Went to sleep 2 hours ago

Wake up blearly eyed, heart beating a thousand miles a minute from being startled by your alarm

Haven't taken your first breath of the morning and already your head is looping back on some asinine detail for no discernible reason. The contract you were working on the night before. Or maybe the lyrics to the song that was caught in your head before bed.

Months on end of this grind has your head feeling like a sieve that has had too many pointless details pushed through it, and now it feels all clogged up.

At work, the warmth of the morning coffee only made you feel more cozy and tired. Resort to slapping yourself in the face and tapping your foot incessantly to get the blood flowing.

Eyes meandering over the same sentence for the fourth time because you can't string words together.

Eventually somebody calls with a fire drill and you get an adrenaline kick to wake you up

Ride the adrenaline until past midnight

Rinse and repeat

Over the course of months, realize that you have physically aged more in the past two years than you had in all prior years combined

Finally understand "how does someone get old"

Optional: Hopefully start making positive health decisions to stave off the reaper.

Jan 25, 2018

Don't be a bitch. Sleep is for the weak. I haven't slept since I was a child.

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Jan 25, 2018

Try meditating before bed. 10-15 minutes is all it takes, I find my sleep quality is much higher if I find the time.

Jan 26, 2018

Get 8 hours.

10 hours of solid, focussed work is much better than 14 hours of dross.

Jan 28, 2018

For some reason there is a lot of pride in bragging about how little sleep you need.

I function best at 7 - 8 hours a night. Most people do. Even the ones who claim they only sleep 3 - 4 hours a night. Yes, I've gone on 3 hours / night for a week, but it is going to catch up on you eventually. That one typo in the pitch deck on page 34 is not going to haunt you 5 years down the road. Ignoring your health and limits, however, might do.

Having said that, I wish I would listen to my own advice more often.

Jan 29, 2018

normal humain beings need to sleep 8 hours minimum, and there is an unhealthy culture in finance and high paid jobs about not needing much sleep.
I am personally in a bulge bracket investment bank (london located) in one of the junior killing teams and happen to need 8 hours sleep. have done well while being a massive sleep needing person. so my advise is that for the first year: catch up on sleep on the weekend, learn how to be efficient and smart with the staffer. your life will improve if you are efficient + know how to prioritize + be smart with your staffer. i am not a push backer but only staffers who are real pricks have been unreasonable with me. since most of banks fear that their analysts will leave within months, people should not be unreasonable with you. if they are, try to avoid being staffed with them.
after the first year, it gets much much easier since you re not at the bottom of the pyramid + you become much more efficient. so again bottom line: efficiency + politics. and that will probably make you top ranked too :)

Jan 29, 2018

Don't be a bitch and power through. Boom, problem solved. Things no longer fit in neat boxes when you're out of college, so most solutions at work and in your personal life revolve around the idea "find a way to make it work". On a more practical note, I've always consumed a lot of coffee, even in school, to keep me going so that's continued at a pretty steady state level in banking. The hours aren't nearly as bad in most places as ppl on this forum portray them to be. Good luck.

Jan 29, 2018

Honestly I was the same, man. In college you sleep a ton. I think you should do the internship and see if you can get used to it; some people can't. Even if you can't, the internship is still just 10 weeks so you'll survive.

I sleep a shit ton, but found that I could get used to it after a while, and unless you're getting consistently crushed, you should typically be able to sneak in 6-8 hours of sleep (depending on your group/bank).

Figure out how much they crush juniors at your specific bank/group. I used this thing called the lobby : www.thelobby.io. Spoke with a few guys at diff banks, and focused on one that seemed to be good for deal flow, and where hours only get crazy if you're leading a deal.

Jan 29, 2018

For me, I've found 6 hours is an adequate amount of sleep without harming my production at work. However, I used to always sleep for 8-9 hours, but found this as a waste of time when trying to optimize my schedule.

Try starting your day early by either hitting the gym or creating a morning routine. Discipline your body to operate on this new clock and gradually you will start to be more focused and alert since your internal clock has already started ticking. It's pretty difficult at first, and some day I still feel like a truck hit me when waking up at 4AM, but at the end of the day you reclaim lost time from just staying in bed.

Jan 29, 2018

Depends how well you treat your mind/body/diet in other areas:

Hate Your Job/ Don't Exercise / Eat Junk Food+Candy Bars = need more sleep
Love What You Do / Exercise 3-4 times a week / Plenty of Protein+Fruits+Vegetables = less sleep.

Jan 30, 2018

In my personal experience, Ive found zzzquill (to get to sleep) and adderall (to wake up) to be a solid temporary solution, but I wouldn't recommend this unless you have no other options, I can only assume its really unhealthy.

Other than that, give running a shot. If I get a hard few miles in, in the morning, I notice that I get far more restful sleep. It also goes without saying that there are many other benefits, physical and mental, that come with making it a habit.

Apr 12, 2018

For me,6 hours are enough.

Apr 12, 2018

Yeah I have had a similar problem, I exercise a lot and often used to sleep in way longer than I wanted to - wouldn't sleep through my alarms, but got into a habit where I'd turn the alarm off instinctively before I knew it and would keep sleeping. Few things that work for me to get past this:

1) set multiple, really loud alarms (not sure how loud yours are)
2) when you hear it, wait a few seconds (force yourself to) before turning it off - you will be more awake
3) as soon as you've turned it off, put on some music or something to help wake you up faster

etc etc. Of course, that's if you hear the alarm but turn it off. If you really don't hear it at all you just need to find a much louder alarm that you will hear.

Something that works really well for me but is extreme and I don't really like doing it (because I like to hear my alarm and then spend ~10 mins slowly waking up and relaxing) and something you could try is putting a really loud alarm on and your phone (assuming that's what you use) across the room from you - you're forced to get out of bed and walk to turn it off which wakes you up. Key to this is to stay out of bed and not get back in when alarm is off

Apr 12, 2018

The above can help but I'd caution you about looking at biological requirements as a "problem". Check with a doctor to make sure there isn't some underlying condition...I can think of a few off hand but will not venture a diagnosis. Someone your age (I'm assuming 20+/-) shouldn't need that much sleep but if your body is calling for it, it's a bad idea to ignore that there may be something else going on.

Apr 12, 2018

See a doctor. If you really need to get up, put your alarm clock on the other side of the room, so you have to get up for it.

Apr 12, 2018
simplechimp:

So recently I've been sleeping ridiculous amounts, 10-12hrs a night. I set multiple alarms to prevent me from over sleeping but it hasn't been working I just sleep through them.

Cut the caffeine, alarm clock across the room and don't go back to bed after you wake up. Not to sound rude, but this whole problem makes you sound like a lazy pussy.

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Apr 12, 2018

I wish it was just laziness. It's not about just 'not feeling' like getting out of bed. It's more that I continue sleeping... Right through my 5 alarms. I wouldn't be asking for advice if it was a problem I knew I could correct by changing my attitude.

Apr 12, 2018

I was way out of line when I wrote this, I've reached out to apologize to the OP and the board as a whole for my poor behavior. I had skimmed his post which isn't an excuse and there is nothing to be ashamed of in his problem.

Apr 12, 2018

@"notthehospitalER"

Thanks for the advice. I'll give it a try. If all else fails I'll see a doctor.

Apr 12, 2018

Thanks to everyone for the advice.

The reason I'm unsure about this is because it hasn't always been this way. I've always been a deep sleeper but I used to be able to wake up feeling refreshed after 5-7 hours of sleep. It's just frustrating because it's reducing my productivity.

Apr 12, 2018

This is what you need.

    • 1
Apr 12, 2018

Above all else, consult a doctor. There area few things you can do before seeing a doctor though.

My non-professional advice is to look into taking a sleep study. You might have sleep apnea of some sorts. I snore sporadically and it limits my ability to get deep sleep for long periods of time. You might be able to find a mattress which works better for you. Check mattress underground (google it if link doesn't work).

Keep in mind the average human your age needs roughly 7.5-8 hrs/night of sleep. There's a standard deviation around this number of about +/- 1 hrs. Meaning less than 1% of the population can actually thrive on 3-4 hrs/night of sleep. Also means some people will require more sleep.

You get a lot of machismo and confirmation bias on a forum like this, "I did it no problem, if you can't you're weak" when in actuality there are reasons some people can and others can't. Many of those reasons can be fixed. Other than advice on alarm clocks, please don't take medical advice from me or anyone else in this thread.

Apr 12, 2018

My girlfriend used to have this problem. Moving the phone/alarm across the room did the trick...but also pissed me off whenever she would stay over

Apr 12, 2018

move blackberry alarm across the room, light alarm, and download the puzzle alarm for your phone. my (unfortunate) daily routine, but at least I've never woken up 3 hours late for work.

Apr 12, 2018

It's not so much about the number of alarms but the time you set them. The key to waking up is waking up at the end of a sleep cycle. There's an app called sleepy time (website called sleepyti.me) that's super easy and gives you half a dozen options for when to set your alarm depending on the time you go to bed. You can also do the opposite: enter the time you need to wake up and it tells you when to fall asleep.

I had the same problem and this app worked wonders for me. You can even sleep for ~3 hours and feel pretty much the same as if you had ~8 hours of sleep.

"I'm going to make him an offer he can't refuse."

Apr 12, 2018
Green_Bananas:

It's not so much about the number of alarms but the time you set them. The key to waking up is waking up at the end of a sleep cycle. There's an app called sleepy time (website called sleepyti.me) that's super easy and gives you half a dozen options for when to set your alarm depending on the time you go to bed. You can also do the opposite: enter the time you need to wake up and it tells you when to fall asleep.

I had the same problem and this app worked wonders for me. You can even sleep for ~3 hours and feel pretty much the same as if you had ~8 hours of sleep.

I use a sleep cycle app too on my iPhone and it might be a placebo effect but I find it helps.

Apr 12, 2018

been there, done that. especially during the first years of college.

being more active, gym, etc should hopefully help that. the more you do (more energy spending), the less you want to sleep. the less you do (less energy), the more you want to sleep. ironic, huh?

Apr 12, 2018

Back when I had a Blackberry, I used an app that made you solve several math problems before it would shut off. I'm sure there are similar apps for each phone on the market you could try.

Apr 12, 2018

Are you working out?

I've found that at least for me, when I am not consistently getting some cardio/weightlifting into my schedule then I become lethargic and sleep much more and have much less energy than I normally do.

Might seem strange but try expending energy to give yourself some energy in return.

Fly, Fight, and Win.

Apr 12, 2018

Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

Apr 12, 2018

I find that when I'm in a weightlifting routine, I need much more sleep ( 9 hrs compared to the usual 6 or 7) than if I only do cardio.

Not sure if you workout or not, but I'd be curious to see if it has any affect.

Apr 12, 2018

Go to the doctors, it could be Mono

Apr 12, 2018

My alarm clock makes me solve 10 math problems before It stops, it works. That and I put it on the other side of the room.

Apr 12, 2018

\\\

Apr 12, 2018

Maybe go to a doctor and figure out if anything has happened medically, if not i would recommend to try your hardest on day to wake up as early as possible. After that try it again and soon enough you might get right into the groove of waking up early. This always worked when i was younger during summers when i would wake up late and couldn't control it.

VPA

Apr 12, 2018

How much exercise do you get? are you letting your body recover? if you are weight lifting, whats your diet like? does your diet help you recover or are you eating junk food? so many factors could be playing here

Apr 12, 2018

Are you based in New York? It just so happens a good friend of mine is a doctor whose specialty is sleep disorders and I think he could help you with this. PM if you would like me to refer him to you.

Apr 12, 2018

what

Apr 12, 2018

all be what?

Apr 12, 2018

Cool story bro

Apr 12, 2018

I will tell it again.

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