How to handle stress?

BankerHopeful's picture
Rank: Baboon | 132

Hey guys,

I'll be completely honest. I know I'm only a Sophomore in college right now, and I know there's not a lot for me to stress about. And I'm not implying that my life is insanely busy and there's a hundred different things I'm worrying about everyday. But this early recruiting's gotten me a little stressed day to day, and even though I'm working hard in terms of networking, technicals, etc., it's just the stress of it all that ocassionaly gets to me. Any tips on handling the stress from this early recruitment period and just handling stress in general? Thanks once again

Comments (21)

  • Analyst 1 in Other
Feb 23, 2020

Start jacking off and aim to increase your #.

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Mar 3, 2020

Also do edibles

Feb 25, 2020

Wim Hoff videos. Check his website and do his breathing exercises

Most Helpful
Feb 25, 2020

If you're religious, pray about it. Trusting God takes will take all of the burden off of you.

That doesn't mean stop working, but if you have trust and faith you'll see that things pan out if you let them.

It's been hugely helpful in getting me through the hard times. 100% recommend giving Jesus a holla in both the good times and bad times.

"Out the garage is how you end up in charge
It's how you end up in penthouses, end up in cars, it's how you
Start off a curb servin', end up a boss"

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Feb 25, 2020

Nicotine.

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  • Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
Feb 26, 2020

Nicotine and prayer

Feb 26, 2020

Pornhub. Premium membership. Thank me later!

    • 2
Mar 3, 2020

I'm piper perrri and life is a BBC

Feb 26, 2020

Stay organized, make an Excel spreadsheet of your networking and a schedule or list of your technical to dos. Have small goals each week (say 2 networking phone calls, understand the 3 accounting statements well and be able to construct them). Schedule your recruiting-related work onto specific days (excluding networking calls) so you're not constantly worrying. Write down your progress/success each week or check off your goals: give yourself evidence of your efforts.

Also, 95% of the technicals you'll be asked can be learned about in a week or two. Deeper understanding is a great idea but don't drown trying to read every book recommended here if you're already stressed. If you can get through the M&I 400 PDF you'll be fine in most interviews.

Array

    • 1
Feb 26, 2020

Thank you so much for this

Array

Feb 26, 2020

Super helpful, I'm definitely glad you said this. I try to stay as organized as possible and making small goals, as you said, when it comes to networking/technicals has been a huge help. I guess I'm most stressed about just landing the interviews for the time being. Any insight on things like referrals? I thankfully have a decent amount of contacts at most firms, but can only get 3-4 Analyst/Associate referrals max

Array

Feb 26, 2020

If you're this stressed about landing interviews maybe you should reconsider why you want to go into a highly stressful profession in the first place?

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Feb 26, 2020

Honestly, I would say that the best thing you can do is carve out a block of time during the day where you turn everything off, stop focusing on the world around you and do something that you enjoy doing. This way, you can relax and focus on doing something to take your mind off of everything going on. The other thing I recommend is to start hitting the gym daily.

The one thing that I recommend is to hit the gym daily. Seriously, you can find a ton of articles on the subject. Whether you choose to lift, run, do yoga, or something else, being active is a fantastic way to help manage stress and get into a routine that will help you out during your working career. It makes it easier to handle tough situations. It allows you to focus on what you're doing without thinking about the world around you. Whether it's working on a yoga pose or focusing on deadlifting 405lbs, all of your attention is directed to what you're doing and not what's on your mind. It forces you to concentrate on the here and now and, for me at least, creates a sense of clarity. Plus, it gets you into good habits, particularly when you're working in a tough job and need to find a zen place to reset yourself.

Feb 26, 2020

Second this. I play a sport at my school, and no matter how stressed out I am, at practice I forget everything for a couple hours. If you like a sport, your school might have a rec league team that practices twice a week or so.

Feb 26, 2020

To add to what others have said..
(1) meditate for 3-5 minutes twice per day. It sounds weird at first.. but once you try it, it is very empowering and helps the world around you slow down a bit.. can't recommend this enough for anyone who hasn't tried this before.
(2) join a gym, or just go to your university's, and learn to lift. Start with a push (chest/tricep), pull (back/bicep), legs (quad/Ham/glute/calve) routine. Once you get the basics down, start setting small and achievable goals. The smaller the goal the better IMO. Achieving the goals over time will remind you that you're constantly progressing. Use the following link for reference to workouts, do 3-5 exercises per muscle group, with 3-5 sets per exercise in the 8-12 rep range and you'll be good to go. https://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises

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Feb 26, 2020

Honestly, going to the gym helps a lot more than you'd think. Even if its 30-45 mins 5 days a week, you'll find it will start to help! I also used to make checklists on a piece of paper for everything I had going on each day. Crossing something off of a list can be very satisfying.

Feb 26, 2020

Big thing that helped me out: focus on separating the things you are stressed/worried about into 2 buckets - things you have control over and things you don't have control over.

For example, worrying about an upcoming midterm would be something you have control over, and the control is regarding your preparation. On another hand, worrying about the results of a test or an interview is pointless - it is out of your hands at that point.

Somewhat simplistic but it really helped me because I often found the most stressful things in my life were out of my control. If that's the case, then worrying gets me nowhere. For other stressful things that, I could control, I gained relief by actively doing things to affect the situation.

Feb 26, 2020

exercise, sex, sleep, doing things in moderation, listening to music, reading, talking with friends and family

  • Analyst 2 in IB - Ind
Feb 27, 2020

PNG - Pray, Network, Gym and Repeat

Mar 2, 2020
Comment
I tried.
Mar 3, 2020
Comment

"The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates, and a monthly salary." - Nassim Taleb

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