iBanking Interviews and Behavior Questions

ekhan's picture
Rank: Senior Monkey | 79

hey guys,

I wanted to know if interviewers tend to ask a lot of follow up questions during the behavioral portion of the interview? From your experiences as an interviewer, did you have to clear up or be more specific about a general answer or do interviewers tend to move on to the next question?

Comments (12)

Jun 23, 2009

It depends on the interviewer and it depends on the answer to the question. If you offer a complete answer and pretty much close out the point in a natural way, then another question will usually be brought up (again this is in general, and I have been drilled on many questions where the interviewer actually takes time to digest my answer and then fire out 2 or 3 more questions directly related to my answer to dig deeper). If you offer a stock answer that doesn't answer the question in a thorough manner, then I know I as an interviewer have definitely asked further questions to get to a strong answer or find out that the applicant is just trying to BS (it's also happened to me when I have given a glossy answer in the past that really didn't fully answer the question). It also, of course, depends on the question, but in general, answer the question, answer it thoroughly (but not in a redundant or repetitive manner) and even if a follow-up question is asked, you should be comfortable with it and able to handle it - if not, be honest and move on - to borrow a line from Role Models - don't [try to] BS a BSer.

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Jun 23, 2009

Think of it this way, if you bring something up, make sure you know a lot about it. In almost ALL of my interviews I had for IB, they asked a question, then asked a question pertaining to my answer (wanted me to go further). If you are bluffing on something, they will call you out. Have prepared answers, but be quick on your feet.

Jun 23, 2009

Cover all your bases. That means that you should be prepared for follow up questions.

Some follow up questions will be easy for you to "sell yourself", meaning that you can nail them and it works tremendously in your favor. Interviewers some times ask tricky or curveball follow up questions to see how you respond to pressure, and if you respond with calm, confidence, and conviction, you will look great. After getting an offer, one of my interviewers at a BB called to congratulate, and said that he thought in a few years he could see me taking the lead with clients.

Just one anecdote of why behavioral questions matter.

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Jun 24, 2009

Interviews are like freestyle rap battles. If your really good you can just show up and flow, but 99% of the time they have books & books full of rhymes put together before hand so they can respond no matter what.

Jun 24, 2009

What is your strength?
How do you manage your stress?
What was your favorite/ least favorite class in college?
How would you describe yourself, a team worker or a leader?
Why (your school)?
(If you are from non target) Why do we have to hire you over HPY?

Jun 24, 2009

He is a tool. What kind of fag would ask those questions in a banking interview?

Jun 24, 2009
Advisory88:

He is a tool. What kind of fag would ask those questions in a banking interview?

I believe if I am correct that the OP goes to Wharton. I am sure that if the interviewer is already satisfied that with the persons qualifications they might just ask behavioral questions. I do agree that this is the exception not the rule.

What type of position was this for?

Jun 24, 2009

Ambiguous, I'd say.

Jun 24, 2009

I had some interviews like this for banking and PE. There are some people who believe this is the only way to interview someone or they don't just don't know any better. Don't sweat it though, they are probably asking all the same questions to every candidate and every candidate is left scratching their heads.

Jun 24, 2009
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