Comments (69)

Oct 26, 2010

bump

Oct 26, 2010

Ask a few questions about his career and what he does, maybe some technicals to show that you know the product, apart from that....sports, cars, whatever.

Oct 26, 2010

I would ask for specific details on compensation. Also, a "Why your investment bank?" never fails.

    • 1
Oct 26, 2010

^good advice above

I would also ask about their background, as people love to talk about themselves.

Oct 26, 2010

This question would be much easier to answer if we knew what property types or geographic area(s) the fund typically targets.

Oct 26, 2010

Fund size, and acquisition criteria will help you out a lot. Some funds list both on their web site.

Please don't quote Patrick Bateman.

Oct 26, 2010

They focus on distressed and undervalued debt and equity opportunities in the U.S., Asia and Europe.They also focus on real estate, securitized loan obligations, and investments in other funds.

Oct 26, 2010

When it's lunch, it's okay to discuss business, but don't let that be the topic of the entire period. You're last few sentences above are dead on. Have lunch and then work on a 60 second sound byte at the end that sells you, shows your interest and "tactfully" places your resume into his hands at the end of the lunch. Always finish lunch with some type of follow up request.

"Cut the burger into thirds, place it on the fries, roll one up homey..." - Epic Meal Time

Oct 26, 2010

Try to talk about him, don't focus to much on you. MD meet candidates all the time, it's so borring for them and they will remember 5% of them maximum...try to find some common ground on some extra-curricular activity you have. He will remember you way easier. Sell yourself but not only that.

Oct 26, 2010

I was thinking of starting off the conversation by asking him to tell me his "story" and journey to where he is today. So mostly I will just be listening. If there is a common area, or a spot in the conversation where I can chime in, I definitely will.

Anything else

Oct 26, 2010

You should definitely dress up for any meeting with an MD - even at a boutique. He may be wearing jeans, but you need to be in a full suit. Bringing a resume is also a good idea - cover letter is probably unnecessary.

Be ready to discuss your experiences and ask him good, relevant questions about his experiences and his firm specifically. At the end of the meeting, if it hasn't gotten to this already, make sure you ask about any opportunities his firm might have. If you don't ask, he'll assume you don't want it enough. MDs generally aren't stupid - he realizes your meeting involves pitching him your services - and he'll treat it like an informal interview. You should treat it the same way.

Oct 26, 2010

Sovjet, thanks for the prompt response, the advice is great!!

I agree that I should be asking him questions about his experiences/the firm, however do you think he's going to ask me questions - more specifically technical ones? Or should I have a general understanding of the current markets/eco conditions for now...

Oct 26, 2010
infiniti89:

Sovjet, thanks for the prompt response, the advice is great!!

I agree that I should be asking him questions about his experiences/the firm, however do you think he's going to ask me questions - more specifically technical ones? Or should I have a general understanding of the current markets/eco conditions for now...

I wouldn't expect anything too technical but you should prepare yourself anyway. Even if he doesn't ask you technical questions you have to give your own input on the current conditions so it looks like you know the industry. Be well prepared, it will show him that you actually want a job.

Oct 26, 2010

Expect the unexpected, but I wouldn't normally expect technical questions from an MD at an informational interview. He might ask you a little bit about your interests in IB in general, your experiences, why his firm specifically, and your goals. This'll help him judge whether or not you're even in the right ballpark. Technicals are usually reserved for more formal interviews (which you will have, if you impress). He'll be more concerned with fit and the desire to learn/work at his firm specifically.

Oct 26, 2010

One nuanced tip as a caveat to the above:

Don't be a tool when asking questions (aka, ask the right questions). If he's an MD that specializes in medical devices in the mountain region, don't ask him how a potential Greek default will impact his business. Basically, don't make it seem like all you did was read the headlines of the Journal that morning and know nothing else. Don't pretend to be knowledgeable about anything. It's much better to show interest by asking him to clarify specific details while he's talking, then to ask him a question out of left field. Keep it micro.

Just something I've noticed.

Oct 26, 2010

Thanks guys this is all very helpful, I appreciate the input!!!!

Oct 26, 2010

Sovjet, good response.

Infiniti, how did you structure your cold email to the MD? I've only been contacting boutiques and MMs that are actively posting positions but I think I may have more luck networking into a boutique that hires on an ad-hoc basis.

My name is Nicky, but you can call me Dre.

Oct 26, 2010
aempirei:

Sovjet, good response.

Infiniti, how did you structure your cold email to the MD? I've only been contacting boutiques and MMs that are actively posting positions but I think I may have more luck networking into a boutique that hires on an ad-hoc basis.

aempirei,

I basically started off by introducing myself (school, major etc), then proceeded with my interest in their firm/IB, and concluded by asking to meet shortly to talk about their experiences in the industry and with the bank. Don't make it seem like you are just seeking an interview, especially with a cold e-mail.

Oct 26, 2010

Be prepared to "tell your story" and talk about your personal work experience. Make sure to research the boutique extensively before hand (know what kind of deals they do/what industry/any specialties) along with the MD's background.

Try to turn it into a conversation and it'll be much easier, be likeable and enthusiastic. Let him know you're very interested in banking and would love an opportunity to interview for any position at his firm.

Definitely wear a suit, as for your resume, you can always email it to him afterwards (which is easier so he can forward it to the correct people).

good luck

Oct 26, 2010
gstackle32:

Be prepared to "tell your story" and talk about your personal work experience. Make sure to research the boutique extensively before hand (know what kind of deals they do/what industry/any specialties) along with the MD's background.

Try to turn it into a conversation and it'll be much easier, be likeable and enthusiastic. Let him know you're very interested in banking and would love an opportunity to interview for any position at his firm.

Definitely wear a suit, as for your resume, you can always email it to him afterwards (which is easier so he can forward it to the correct people).

good luck

Thanks gstackle!!

Oct 26, 2010

Anybody know of any good specific questions to ask?

Oct 26, 2010

Asking about specific deals is usually good - it shows interest and if you can discuss it somewhat intelligently, it shows understanding.

Asking about his experiences with the firm, the firm's strengths, where he sees the firm going, and how he sees the market for boutique M&A expanding is also solid.

Normally, if you're doing an interview with an analyst/associate, it's relevant to ask about their recruitment experiences, how they broke in, etc. Because he's an MD, he'd be too far removed from that - so I'd stay away from those types of questions.

To sum it all up, anything to do with specific deals and the firm's general outlook internally and externally is a solid bet.

Oct 26, 2010

He's not an analyst but you still need to make a connection on a friendly level as well. He will be much more likely to recommend you if he thinks you are smart AND he likes you. So try to find some general common interests and talk about that as well. He is an MD but no one wants to talk finance all the time and the ones I've met would much rather talk about sports or something like that. Not saying you should spend the entire conversation talking about the NFL but showing more of your casual side lets him know you as a person. Sports and travel were the main casual talking points I usually used and it always helped make a connection or "lighten" the conversation a bit.

Everything Sovjet mentioned are good topics. You don't have to talk about how he broke in but you can ask about his background and experience in the industry.

Oct 26, 2010

To be honest, it is rarely what you ask that matters, but rather, how you ask it...show passion! The best questions are always the ones that you really want to know the answers to. That way, you find yourself listening to the answers, rather than nodding along every 10 seconds, like most people do. Then, he will really be impressed.

Oct 26, 2010

Have a very good understanding of the current credit situation. Be able to aske intelligent questions on how his / her firm fits into the mess. Ask insightful questions about their current deals.

Either you sling crack rock or you got a wicked jump shot

Oct 26, 2010

Just be yourself and don't try too hard. If you want it to be a relationship you have to prove you are a likable person. You have the job, you aren't interviewing, so just be confident, and treat it as lunch with a friend rather than lunch with an interviewer. Listen intently to what he has to say, allow him to talk about himself, and answer any questions he asks you. I would see if you can talk a little more about your personal lives than in an interview and see if you guys have something in common that you can for a relationship over (sports, hobbies, vacations, etc).

NEVER lose your BlackBerry
www.conveniencesoftware.com

Oct 26, 2010

knowing technical finance stuff is not top priority of the list of things you should know

just know why you want to do this, and what are qualities you have to offer. make sure to show motivation and strong interest

and maybe have a good understanding of the financial world/news

Oct 26, 2010

Don't worry about it.... just chill out it's just a meeting, you don't have to know the technical finance stuff, just be aware of what's going on with the markets and try to discuss the current market environment.
Also speak proper English "I have spoken" rather than "I have spoke".

Don't go there as if it's a job opportunity, just be yourself and you will do fine

Oct 26, 2010

Try to keep it informal and ask him as many questions as you can about what he does and how he got to where he is. Seem interested and make every effort to get a good conversation going (shouldn't be too difficult since he will probably be relaxed.) If this guy is through a connection he is probably just doing a quick check to make sure there is no reason he can't bring you on. I doubt it will come to technical questions but know those just in case. Your goal here is to keep it informal and make him like you. Make sure to do research on the firm and ask lots of intelligent questions (but not those douchey, overly complicated, suck-up questions.) Good luck!

Oct 26, 2010

I would still treat it as a semi-interview - you make good impression on him, and he'll get you a first-round interview or recommend you speak to the right HR person/recruiter.

Generally, MD's love to talk about their experience, so after a quick introduction about yourself, your career goals, etc., ask him about his experiences (do some research on what sector/group he's in, what deals they've done, etc.), what he likes about his role, what qualities he looks for in his analysts, etc.

Oct 26, 2010

All my interviews were through networking, and most were with MD's. Here's how I would approach it:

--don't mislead him at any point thinking he's interviewing someone for his division
--show that you know a little bit about the MD's division, ask intelligent questions
--show an interest in what you're doing now and be good at it
--be able to draw a logical connection as to how the skill set you have/are developing now connects to the work that you want to do
--be charming

Don't worry about offending anyone, there's no chance of that, but accept that by not going for what he's in charge of you're taking the risk that he'll just flick your resume off to HR or whomever if he doesn't know anyone in your target group. In any case, it's a good contact and you never know when it will come in handy.

Oct 26, 2010

Good.

Oct 26, 2010

I was a little rattled that the call was so short.

I get my CPA in a few weeks, writing CFA in june. When do you guys think I should send my CV? Now? or in a few weeks when I officially have my CPA? or hold off altogether until I get my June level 1 completed?

Oct 26, 2010

Send it now with L1 candidates wording as per the standards, as he asked for it right? Once certs. have been gained, prompt with updated CV.

Oct 26, 2010

You haven't done anything wrong here. Just treat him like a friend instead of like someone who's interviewing you.

"I do not think there is any other quality so essential to success of any kind as the quality of perseverance. It overcom

Oct 26, 2010

Assuming this guy works on Wall Street, he won't give a shit that you aren't at his firm.

Oct 26, 2010

if you see him as a mentor and he treats you like a mentee, there's nothing wrong with having a casual/friendly chat. see how the conversation goes as you never know, he may bring up the subject of your internship this summer and start giving you some good advice. at the end of the day, if you are talented, he may still recruit you once you have done an internship at his "no. 1 competitor" just so you would have a more diverse training background than say your peers who only have interned at 1 shop.

Oct 26, 2010

Show him your hungry for knowledge and experience and see if he knows anyone still in the industry he could connect you with. If internships aren't common in Australia for freshmen, try to back door your way in by "shadowing" someone for a couple days a week. Use him as a center of influence and pick his brain for contacts/advice. You have a huge leg up comparetivley speaking than most kids your age. Ask him his story and how the path he took. Find out what you should be doing between now and graduation that will give you the best position to get to where you want to go.

People love to talk about themselves and give advice to young go-getters like yourself. They see themselves in you and generally love to help.

Networking, well getting hammered at homecoming weekend with alumni of my fraternity is how I got my job. My boss was wearing USMA rowing hat, and I asked if he had family who attended Westpoint. I mentioned my service and 1 week later I found myself at Star Diner (Eggs and Legs type of joint) with an offer.

Morale of the story, If you start early and network/meet as many people as possible all throughout college, study hard, good things will happen for you.

I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass... and I'm all out of bubblegum.

Oct 26, 2010

Basically, be intelligent, ask about his life, ask for advice, treat him like a normal person, don't feel a need to impress him, don't try to sell yourself, be knowledgeable about his firm but if he tells you something you know don't mention it, have about ten open ended questions ready to go to keep conversation flowing, don't talk about his firm's bonus/comp situation, know why you are interested in finance, be able to discuss the days news, stuff like that. Here are some other times it has been asked:

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/meeting-with... http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/quick-questi...
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/meeting-with... http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/about-to-hav...
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/meeting-with... http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/meeting-with...
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/lunch-with-m... http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/talking-with...
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/etiquette

Oct 26, 2010

drexel, that's fantastic. I had a similar idea but was too lazy to execute.

Oct 26, 2010

The first time i met an md i was nervous as shit, but as you meet more of them you realize they are just people too, and if they are willing to meet, they are usually willing to help.

I don't know how you were introduced to the md (cold calling? networking? alum? family friend?) I feel like you should prepare differently depending on how you got the meeting, in terms of your talking points (pick points of common interest, ex for alum talk about the school and what it was like when he went to school or w/e). For me, I brushed up on some recent news about the firm and just had a good story for myself (why finance, why this division, why this firm).

Also, youd be surprised how easily you can get an interview just by talking to one md. they know a lot of people and as long as you can impress the md, or even just have a good conversation, they usually will ask for your resume without you bringing it up and offer to pass it along to the right people.

Oct 26, 2010

Be professional. Don't sound like a little kid. You want to be personable, but don't be annoying.

Oct 26, 2010

this seems like a pretty good niche, not many people can really fit your profile so perfectly. I would just try to be likable and appear knowledgable about the deals that this MD has worked on.

Oct 26, 2010

Sounds like he thinks you fit the bill as someone he wants to work in NY/London and then ultimately the Middle East. Obviously coming from Middle Eastern descent, you would have an easier time living and working in the Middle East.

My advice would be to appear likeable and ADAPTABLE. Since you'll be working in a few different locations, portray that you're a flexible and adaptable guy who handles stress and change well. Portray your excitement to experience new places, as well as the IBD industry. Obviously as a humanities major, you won't be expected to have that much in-depth knowledge of IBD...but this could work in your favor because you if show up to the meeting and can hold a conversation that involves technicals, you'll be impressive.

~GrandJury

Oct 26, 2010

Hey guys,

Thanks a lot! Grandjury, I saw that you mentioned technicals? I saw that Emirates NBD, which is a private bank, is acquiring some BB's commercial banks in the UAE. I saw this deal on Perella's website under selected transactions. How do I go about asking him intelligent questions about that deal? Should I ask him what's the hold up or what challenges they are facing with closing the deal? Thanks!

Oct 26, 2010

Technicals as in basic accounting and finance knowledge.

And just mention that you were browsing through some finance articles/company website and saw that information and found it intriguing, and that you would love to hear his perspective about it.

~GrandJury

Oct 26, 2010

There are a ton of comments there. Why do you want more?

Oct 26, 2010

Appreciate the reply, but refer to the second last comment, please. It's an update.

I'll copy paste it here:

HSdaydreamer:

Thanks again everyone!! Following up again, for those who care. If it wasn't for WSO I wouldn't have done any of the following so i'm extremely thankful. Just bought some credits and will SB all the encouraging comments. For now, I'm seeking some advice again.

Edit: New post not visible. I think the spam filter blocked it. Anyway:

So, with your encouragement and some push from people I knew like the Portfolio Manager I had met from the HF, I started learning financial modeling and got some confidence to email/call local boutique firms. I sent out about 12 resumes and cold called a this guy who started a boutique firm a few years ago. Explained to him i'm in HS but have loads of free time and get off lessons at about 12 everyday, am very motivated and interested etc. etc.. I had no idea who he was at this point. He told me he was interested, gave me his email and asked me to send him my resume and CV. I emailed it to him about 2 days ago, and then I googled his name. Found out he's NOW an MD at an elite boutique (Lazard, BX, etc.).

I just got a positive response from him and he is impressed by my enthusiasm and wants to meet me for coffee and see what he can do to get me an internship. I'm not too concerned about the interview part as I think I can be smooth and get a conversation going. I'll prepare myself for some technicals. But I do have a few questions:

What would he expect? If you were in his shoes, what would you expect of such a HS student? I'm pretty normal, athletic build and not as nerdy as you'd expect. What should I wear? I'd "suit up" but in my eyes it would be a pretty douche-y thing to do. Would a shirt and jeans be fine? Will wearing the suit show him that i'm in fact, capable of being "mature" in a way? Is it safe to ask him if he can do something for me at the elite boutique (BX, Laz) instead of the one he started? Or is that stepping over the line?

Looking forward to your insights.

Oct 26, 2010

You should definitely suit-up (open collar if you're that concerned about it). There is no excuse to wear jeans...ever...in a professional setting.

Also, don't ask for anything. Just offer that you are willing to help in anyway that you are needed. If he offers you some work at the firm he started, smile and take it. Once you're in, ask to help out with any work he has going on at LAZ/BX. Do this only after you've proven yourself as a competent intern.

I'm not in IB, but all of this is pretty common sense and applies to all professions.

Oct 26, 2010
manbearpig:

You should definitely suit-up (open collar if you're that concerned about it). There is no excuse to wear jeans...ever...in a professional setting.

Also, don't ask for anything. Just offer that you are willing to help in anyway that you are needed. If he offers you some work at the firm he started, smile and take it. Once you're in, ask to help out with any work he has going on at LAZ/BX. Do this only after you've proven yourself as a competent intern.

I'm not in IB, but all of this is pretty common sense and applies to all professions.

Ah, I'll keep that in mind. I've a charcoal colored one, will use that.

Yeah, if he gives me something at the boutique I prob wouldn't push it. Just looking for the exposure right now anyway.

Btw, MBP, our short PM exchange was one of the reasons I chose to do this. Feel indebted, waiting for my credits to be updated. Cheers.

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