11/19/17

So I was at dinner last night and really lamenting the information sources available nowadays. I am looking for some suggestions of either magazines, journals (academic or other), as well as research sources. Looking for science, medical, foreign affairs, economics, technology, anything other than current events or business.

Some of the things I have read over the years or still do read

National Affairs
Chatham House
FDA
Nature
Reason

Website stuff

Anyone have anything else? I realize a similar, but not the same, post was done over the last months. This is more about long form articles or other sources to read in depth about a subject without having to comb the internet for sources, etc. My time is getting more limited and I would love to have a number of publications subscribed to that I could get a packaged, thoughtful, report and expand on it if I decide to.

Thanks.

Comments (21)

3/10/17

Hi TNA, I'm a graduating senior and first I want to thank you for helping me evaluate my profile several days ago in your MSF 2018 post.

I read BI, Reuters, Economist, FT, sometimes McKinsey Insights and Bain Insights. I know that you definitely have more knowledge on newspapers/magazines stuff, but I feel that FT and Reuters (usually the Money and Deals sections) are really good resources. FT digs deeper, while Reuters has a broader range of stories. Those two insights are pretty good too IMO.

I'm not sure if that helps. I hope so.

Financial Modeling
11/10/17

Few recommendations (no particular order)..

1) I've come across a number small random local libraries that offer online resources to the public. If you search around, youll be able to find either posts on their site or PDFs they've circulated with shared logins/passwords to sites like JSTOR, EBSCO, GALE, PROQUEST, Journals...

2) Become proficient with Google Boolean Syntax. Particular query refinements that I have found useful are:
* filetype: limits search results to a specified file type (Example: filetype:xls or filetype:pdf)
* :site: limits results to specified source site (Example: :site:wallstreetoasis.com/ TNA)
... there are a ton of these operators that might help you in your search..

3) Big fan of a number of daily newsletters. Some that come to mind:
* Finimize
* MarketSnacks
* Quartz Daily Brief
* Dealbreaker
* FORTUNEs Term Sheet
* SeekingAlphas SA Morning Briefing
* Barchart Morning Call

Also might consider subscribing to PIMCO Publications.

Hope this helps.

11/19/17

Are there any better free stock sites than seekingalpha. I find the articles there extremely weak. Often only reciting what is already known.

I'd argue that site is actually a huge hindrance to retail money

Array
12/6/17

Valueinvestorsclub.com is still active but you need to submit a pitch for full access. It is hard to get accepted and some pitches can win you money.

You can still access ideas without becoming a full member on a 45 day hold, lots of really good research to read.

Another is sumzero but I think you need to be a member and work on the buyside to read anything there.

11/19/17
notoriousbb:

2) Become proficient with Google Boolean Syntax. Particular query refinements that I have found useful are:
* filetype: limits search results to a specified file type (Example: filetype:xls or filetype:pdf)
* :site: limits results to specified source site (Example: :site:wallstreetoasis.com/ TNA)
... there are a ton of these operators that might help you in your search..

I use this a lot but Google is always asking me to prove I'm not a robot.

Financial Modeling
11/10/17

Now that I'm done abusing you, I will make a couple of science suggestions:

11/10/17

Curious about the penchant for journal/magazine type publications. I'm an avid reader, but it almost entirely consists of non-fiction books, aside from the various websites I skim.

Is it a matter of greater exposure and more horizontal knowledge and interests? Maybe, that the research and articles are more contemporary?

Just trying to figure out what I'm missing and whether it's worth adding a few into my arsenal.

Realize you're not necessarily soliciting website sources, but the Neurologicablog is worth reading. Good deconstruction of current scientific articles and claims with a really strong, lively comment section.

11/10/17

Economist, FT, NatGeo, MIT Technology Review, Muscle & Fitness

11/12/17

Howard Marks' memos on OakTree's site

11/12/17

Full access to PubMed is nice. I had it last year.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Best Response
11/12/17

TNA, part of your problem is that you are reading FAKE NEWS from sources such as magazines, websites, textbooks, peer reviewed publications, etc. I would cut the bullshit and get your information from a more reliable and infallible source.

I'm sure you already know what I mean ... the voodoo art of reading chicken bones and other appendages of critters!

This source is completely commie proof ;).

11/13/17

There is a blog I would recommend to everyone called the Farnamstreetblog. It covers almost every topic and it's got lots of podcasts with prominent figures from all industries. There is a powerful section that I frequent every week: https://www.farnamstreetblog.com/mental-models - basically what Charlie Munger calls a "latticework" of mental models. It's pure genius and I'd encourage everyone to learn at least 5 mental models each week.

11/12/17

Mental Models - interesting concept I'm going to look into further.

26 Broadway
where's your sense of humor?

11/12/17

Good stuff thanks

11/12/17

One of the popular things to do in the academic world is to read publishing's of those with differing views to yours. Find a couple blogs/journals that you enjoy and read them. It's nice to see what the other side is thinking and the reasoning behind that (assuming it's an educated editor/writer and not some media bs).

Some of my faves blogs is http://larrysummers.com/category/blog/Larry's an interesting economist and he provides reasoning behind his thought process

One of my fave journals is https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/world-poli... politics are always fun to follow

11/12/17

Uh I'm not sure if this is relevant for you at all but the only remaining "news" I follow is whatever is published by the American Mathematical Society through social media (usually obituaries or congratulatory articles for rising mathematicians or current professional mathematicians). I know they publish journals (like any other academic organizations) although I'm not sure how remotely useful they would be for someone without a math PhD (but maybe you have one?)

I know WSJ gets flak but I like reading their obituaries, they write some articles on pretty interesting people now and then. I guess I read some pretty lame news though.

National Geographic is still pretty reliable though I think? Lots of cool stuff there! I read it with a grain of salt though.

Again we may have totally different tastes..

11/12/17

3quarksdaily dot com might be interesting for you. Basically bunch of guys search through internet and collect well written articles.

11/13/17

For longer form pieces I like abnormal returns (especially the long form curation on the weekends), farnam street weekly email (list of 5 links as well a few blog posts), and Khe Hy's Rad Reads (mix of deeper articles). I'm also a member of the farnam street learning community which I've really like, happy to answer more if anyone is curious.

11/15/17

Interested in hearing about your experience in the farnamstreet learning community. Long time reader of the blog, several plus years now, but initially balked at the price of joining. Curious to hear more.

11/19/17

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Array
11/21/17

Monkey see. Monkey Doo [Doo].

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