Comments (5)

Jun 22, 2010

Assuming you can't speak with the person first about getting their shit together, I tend to pick up their slack even if it means working overtime/doing more than I should, and then I make it clear to our supervisor what parts of the project I was responsible for (ie - more than I should have been responsible for). This way you never seem like a douche for ratting on a co-worker, and at the same time you show your supervisor you are capable of getting stuff done even when others are dicking around.

Jun 22, 2010
BluesHill:

Assuming you can't speak with the person first about getting their shit together, I tend to pick up their slack even if it means working overtime/doing more than I should, and then I make it clear to our supervisor what parts of the project I was responsible for (ie - more than I should have been responsible for). This way you never seem like a douche for ratting on a co-worker, and at the same time you show your supervisor you are capable of getting stuff done even when others are dicking around.

By going out of your way to tell your supervisor you did more than your fair share, would that not be an implicit ratting-out?

Jun 22, 2010

Not really. Your supervisor makes of it what he/she wants but generally it just shows that you're being honest.

Jun 23, 2010
walkio:

Not really. Your supervisor makes of it what he/she wants but generally it just shows that you're being honest.

Exactly. It's just placing the facts before the supervisor, there are many ways and opportunities to show you are doing more than your fair share without ever going near the phrase, "I want you to know that I am working harder than I should be." If your co-worker is a habitual slacker, it will be noticed without any effort on your part.

That said, I agree with the prev post. The first step is to talk to the person and tell them frankly that they should be pulling for the team.

Jun 22, 2010
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