Is this ethical?

Will Hunting's picture
Rank: King Kong | 1,853

So here's my situation:

I will be attending the wharton investing conference this weeked and I have to submit my resume to them because they put it in a resume book and give that to employers. I will also be participating in their stock pitch competition at that event.

However, I am a little thin on work experience with regard to investing and such because I am only a sophomore. So, I wanted to put the Stock pitch competition on my resume before I submit it to them because it will give me relevant experience.

Even though I have not competed in the competition yet, can I put it on there knowing that by the time recruiters read my resume in the book, i will have already participated in it?

Region: 
United States - Northeast

Comments (12)

Jan 18, 2011

Include it or not, either way it will be clear that your work experience is thin.

Jan 18, 2011
NYorker:

Include it or not, either way it will be clear that your work experience is thin.

i can tell your just trying to pad your post count

"Look, you're my best friend, so don't take this the wrong way. In twenty years, if you're still livin' here, comin' over to my house to watch the Patriots games, still workin' construction, I'll fuckin' kill you. That's not a threat, that's a fact.

Jan 18, 2011
Will Hunting:
NYorker:

Include it or not, either way it will be clear that your work experience is thin.

i can tell your just trying to pad your post count

I can tell you're going to want to put it on your resume regardless of what people tell you.

Also, you can either value a stock or evaluate a stock. You can't "valuate" it. But you can go ahead and put that on your resume too...

Jan 18, 2011

why not dance around the words like 'expected'

Jan 18, 2011

You really think an investment conf is going to hide you lack of WE? It will have minimal impact.

Jan 18, 2011
ANT:

You really think an investment conf is going to hide you lack of WE? It will have minimal impact.

I will be in a stock pitch competition though. I am only a sophomore so how many sophomores actually have relevant work experience. pitching a stock that i valuated and researched for days seems like it would be classified as relevant to a job. especially if it was to the ceo's of top firms like ubs at a top school like wharton

"Look, you're my best friend, so don't take this the wrong way. In twenty years, if you're still livin' here, comin' over to my house to watch the Patriots games, still workin' construction, I'll fuckin' kill you. That's not a threat, that's a fact.

Jan 19, 2011

People really misunderstand sarcasm these days.

Jan 18, 2011

you must "valuate" the pro's and con's.. mostly though they are going to be looking for relevant work experience and having something is better than nothing. also most recruiters will know your a sophomore and don't expect you to have the WE as a junior or senior.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me." - Malone

Jan 18, 2011

You're a sophomore, so you're generally expected to have very little work experience...

Jan 18, 2011

Put it on, but don't use "expected" - you're going to compete, and "expected to compete" is going to sound weird. It might be ethically hazy, but it's not a crime or anything. It's not going to make or break your resume - that's why you can do what you want.

Jan 18, 2011

here's the thing: if you get a nitpicking reader who figures out somehow that you didn't do this thing when you had written your resume, that's going to be a killer ethics ding. the chances are small but the downside is massive. if you get someone who doesn't solve that little time puzzle, it's not much of a valuable thing on a resume.

i should remark for full disclosure: i played by the rules and was honest all my life and it didn't get me far.

Jan 18, 2011
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